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Historic Organ Certificates


Malcolm Farr
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Guest Nigel ALLCOAT
We have 2 notable 19th century RC churches up here, both by Joseph Aloysius Hansom (whose claim to fame was the invention of the Hansom Cab).

DT

 

Hansom's office/house is in the borough of Hinckley - a stone's throw away from St Mary's Church and the George Inn (now The Bounty) where Vierne played and stayed and after which he composed Les Cloches de Hinckley. The Gauntlett Holdich from Union Chapel Islington (talked about elsewhere on the Board) is just about opposite. Hansom created some fine buildings (hunt them - you will be surprised, honest!).

The links and coincidences abound.

Seasons greetings.

Nogel

 

"St. Walburge in Preston, which boasts the tallest church spire in the UK, at 309 feet third only to Salisbury and Norwich Cathedrals."

PS - no doubt you will consider me pedantic, but I thought that the third highest spire after Salisbury and Norwich was St Michael's in Coventry.

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"St. Walburge in Preston, which boasts the tallest church spire in the UK, at 309 feet third only to Salisbury and Norwich Cathedrals."

PS - no doubt you will consider me pedantic, but I thought that the third highest spire after Salisbury and Norwich was St Michael's in Coventry.

 

Not quite!

 

Salisbury Cathedral 404

Norwich Cathedral 315

St Walburge, Preston 309

St Michael, Coventry 295

St James, Louth 295

St Mary, Redcliffe 292

St Wulfram, Grantham 288

St Elphin, Warrington 281

Lichfield Cathedral 252

Truro Cathedral 250

Holy Trinity, Coventry 237

 

DT

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Guest Nigel ALLCOAT
Not quite!

 

Salisbury Cathedral 404

Norwich Cathedral 315

St Walburge, Preston 309

St Michael, Coventry 295

St James, Louth 295

St Mary, Redcliffe 292

St Wulfram, Grantham 288

St Elphin, Warrington 281

Lichfield Cathedral 252

Truro Cathedral 250

Holy Trinity, Coventry 237

 

DT

 

So good to know but it lets the cat out of the bag that I am just a very old mediævalist. N

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So good to know but it lets the cat out of the bag that I am just a very old mediævalist. N

 

St Michael's Coventry is of course the tallest mediaeval church spire.

The late historian and mediaeval expert John Harvey regarded it as the finest tower/spire in the country.

 

Regards

David

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Not quite!

 

Salisbury Cathedral 404

Norwich Cathedral 315

St Walburge, Preston 309

St Michael, Coventry 295

St James, Louth 295

St Mary, Redcliffe 292

St Wulfram, Grantham 288

St Elphin, Warrington 281

Lichfield Cathedral 252

Truro Cathedral 250

Holy Trinity, Coventry 237

 

DT

 

Hmmmm...isn't Truro 247? (Another pedant!)

 

F-W

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Not quite!

 

Salisbury Cathedral 404

Norwich Cathedral 315

St Walburge, Preston 309

St Michael, Coventry 295

St James, Louth 295

St Mary, Redcliffe 292

St Wulfram, Grantham 288

St Elphin, Warrington 281

Lichfield Cathedral 252

Truro Cathedral 250

Holy Trinity, Coventry 237

 

DT

 

I believe that the central spire of St Mary's Cathedral, Edinburgh is 270 ...

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I believe that the central spire of St Mary's Cathedral, Edinburgh is 270 ...

 

And Chichester Cathedral 277...

Truro may well be 247, it all depends which website you believe!

 

I started putting this list together earlier in the year when I heard that St. Walburge's might be closing, and wanted to find out more about the building and it's architect. There's a lot of conflicting and incorrect information out there as to the actual heights of these buildings, in some cases on the churches' own websites. I've visited all these at some time or other, but I'm sure there'll be more 19th century spires which I'm not familiar with.

 

 

Regards,

David

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Hi

 

An interesting question. In principle, the HOC would probably be reconsidered, but I (speaking personally) can't see any problem as long as the original stop list was adhered to, and either s/h Harrison pipes of the correct vintage or new pipes in the correct style were used.

 

Maybe the HOCS coordinator for BIOS would be able to say more.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

 

I am currently involved in the completion of a three manual Hunter instrument dating from 1920. Eight years ago the restoration of the action of the incomplete instrument received grant-aid from the Heritage Lottery Fund, the Council for the Care of Churches and the ON organ fund. Their common attitude to completion was that they could not grant-aid it, but neither would they oppose it provided the specification was as originally intended and second-hand Hunter material of the correct vintage, or new but copied from Hunter, was used. Otherwise they would want their money back.

 

We've still got the original contract, so we know exactly what was intended, and have obtained 11 ranks of pipes and all the missing pneumatic action, reservoirs, chest, choir box, trunking, tremulant, framing - etc. from other Hunter instruments of the right vintage. It all fits perfectly into the space hunter left for it 90 years ago.

 

We are still looking for a pedal trombone and a swell contra fagotto. These are without doubt the most prepared-for ranks ever. I would be delighted to hear from anyone who knows where either might be legitimately obtained.

 

We haven't applied for an HOC but we intend to when the work is complete.

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  • 2 years later...
I was about to mention St. Agnes myself, being based in the Northwest myself, I can recommend their lots of good photos. The organ case on it's gallery look very striking, I presume they were both designed by JLP. Looking at the details of the R&D organ on the NPOR it doesn't look like it was particularly distinguished but it's still a shame that it is now silent.

 

Rather a sweeping statement. I don't know whether or not you have come across Wordsworth & Maskell organs of this period, but they are, without exception, of great tonal quality - equal to Hill of this period. I can't speak for the Rushworth & Dreaper alterations. Hopefully, they didn't add too much tonally!

 

This extremely fine case is indeed J L Pearson and bears a great resemblance to the two in Westminster Abbey, except in that it remains its its natural wood state. Sadly, they seem to have changed their website recently and removed the photos of the case, so the only way is to visit! As for the organ, it is still there, and the electronic which is currently filling its role has been designed to operate as a console for it, should the funds ever become available. The late Dr Caleb Jarvis, once City Organist, i.e., St George's Hall, was Organist there for a time.

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St Michael's Coventry is of course the tallest mediaeval church spire.

The late historian and mediaeval expert John Harvey regarded it as the finest tower/spire in the country.

 

Regards

David

 

 

=======================

 

It is indeed a fine tower/spire, but I wonder of Nikolaus Pevsner would have agreed with Joh Harvey?

 

I think he more or less described St Patrick's. Patrington, ("The Queen of Holderness"), N.Humberside, as "the perfect decorated church." (15th century)

 

In fact, the church actually suffered a little earthquake damage a few years ago, and it has required some renovation work to the spire.....but what a spire!

 

Here are a few pretty piccies:-

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/32672896@N04/5713121247/

 

 

http://www.freefoto.com/preview/1051-60-59...rch--Patrington

 

http://www.skyscrapernews.com/picturedispl...c1.jpg&no=1

 

MM

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