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St. Paul's Psalter


nachthorn
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From another topic, I've been pointed towards the St. Paul's Psalter, edited by John Scott (or John Scott Sr. as one American website has him). Despite being a relatively recent edition, I can't find a copy new or second-hand anywhere, and Canterbury Press simply list it as 'out of print'. Any ideas? Happy to accept second-hand offers if people want to sell their copy of what seems to be like gold dust... :D

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A few weesk ago I wrote to Cantuerbury Press on this subject and got a reply from someone at Norwich Books and Music http://www.norwichbooksandmusic.co.uk saying :-

 

"There will a new edition of the ST Paul’s Cathedral Psalter coming out in July.

 

It is now called The Anglican Psalter and will be priced at £22.00.

 

All previous editions of the Psalter are now out of print."

 

I failed to find a second hand copy but perhaps you will be more lucky.

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From another topic, I've been pointed towards the St. Paul's Psalter, edited by John Scott (or John Scott Sr. as one American website has him). Despite being a relatively recent edition, I can't find a copy new or second-hand anywhere, and Canterbury Press simply list it as 'out of print'. Any ideas? Happy to accept second-hand offers if people want to sell their copy of what seems to be like gold dust... :P

 

Are you sure that you want a copy of this? I regard it as dreadful, having had to use it on many occasions (mostly at Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, for a visiting choir). The pointing is often distinctly odd - and does not always either flow well, or make good sense. In addition, the regular habit of having to leave out certain quarters of many chants leaves the music sounding butchered and disjointed. It also increases considerably the chances of making a mistake, misreading something or failing to omit part of a chant where one is directed to do so.

 

Personally I dislike this psalter. Interestingly, it was about the first thing which Malcolm Archer altered when he was appointed. As far as I know, Andrew Carwood has made no move to re-instate it.

 

It may indeed be out of print *; it may also be dust - but gold? I doubt it.

 

 

 

* Perhaps due to lack of demand.

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Are you sure that you want a copy of this? I regard it as dreadful, having had to use it on many occasions (mostly at Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, for a visiting choir). The pointing is often distinctly odd - and does not always either flow well, or make good sense. In addition, the regular habit of having to leave out certain quarters of many chants leaves the music sounding butchered and disjointed. It also increases considerably the chances of making a mistake, misreading something or failing to omit part of a chant where one is directed to do so.

 

Personally I dislike this psalter. Interestingly, it was about the first thing which Malcolm Archer altered when he was appointed. As far as I know, Andrew Carwood has made no moce to re-instate it.

 

It may indeed be out of print *; it may also be dust - but gold? I doubt it.

 

 

 

* Perhaps due to lack of demand.

I agree there are some odd things in it. I was trying to get a copy merely to study it, but my interest does not stretch to paying £22.00 for the privilege!

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Opinions on this psalter have already been well aired on another topic a few months back. I bought my copy when it first came out but have never had any desire to use it because Im too, think it is dreadful. I bought the first few of the accompanying Cds but they quickly went to the Oxfam shop or wherever.

 

Do we know what psalter they are using at St Thomas's New York?

 

Malcolm

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Richard McVeigh made a very valid point here about quick-moving harmony not working in the St Paul's acoustic and that may well justify John Scott's approach as far as that unique building is concerned. But I still think its promulgation further afield is wrong-headed for the reasons I expressed in this thread. I apologise for expressing such blunt views of a leading musician's work, but, as 'tis said, a cat may look at a king.

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