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Hotpoint 32


Clavecin
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I am now on my 2nd generation toaster at home, and it boasts a most profound and effective 32ft - Hotpoint 32!

 

However, this stop doesn't have a drawstop in the traditional sense, it's only activated when 'the wife' is doing the washing. On spin cycle the washing machine generates a low pitched resonance which permeates the whole house, this is barely audible in my music room but combines superbly with the bottom end of the pedal 16ft registers. I've not been able to discern the exact pitch of this resonance, but it seems to be a harmonic which reacts with just about every note in the 16ft bottom octave to produce a superb Contra Bourdon effect which underpins the rest beautifully. It's most effective from bottom F to B (as are most quiet 32s) but is still there on the lowest notes.

 

But, there's a bonus - when the washer goes onto its high-speed spin the effect becomes a more biting Contra Violone!

 

I play a lot of Cesar Franck (lots of opportunities for quiet 32 under Celestes or Vox Humana/tremulant) and am currently learning 'Grande Piece Symphonique' - a rather time consuming task; and so try to time practice sessions with washing sessions.

 

It's wonderful; no need for speakers the size of wardrobes, no need for those dreadful mutations which just add a hollow growl.

 

Anyboby else got a Hoover 32, Ariston 32, Zanussi 32, Indesit 32?

 

:lol:

 

DT

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How impressive! I just have a Russell Hobbs 10 2/3 these days. Unfortunately I got rid of my electrical appliance for a piano about a year ago. However, the fan on my computer has a range of speeds (it's currently slightly flat of an e, but it has a range of notes with sub-semitones) and it likes to sing along when I play the piano. Sometimes it sings very loudly nowadays - I think it's voice is maturing as it gets older into quite a shouter. I also think it's going deaf in its old age.

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I am now on my 2nd generation toaster at home, and it boasts a most profound and effective 32ft - Hotpoint 32! ...

 

I play a lot of Cesar Franck (lots of opportunities for quiet 32 under Celestes or Vox Humana/tremulant) ...

 

DT

 

I have a nice shiny Bellini toaster. However, the washing machine does not appear to interact with it in any way.

 

Incidentally, I have no particular wish to spoil your fun, but as far as I can remember, there are only two instances of Franck specifying the use of a Céleste in his entire organ works; as it happens, both appear in the Grande Pièce Symphonique; the first at the start of the second Andante section and the other is fifty eight and a half bars later, shortly before the grand restatement of the theme in the major.

 

 

OK - so I am having a bit of a slow evening....

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We have one of those washing machine thingies. However, it is one of the 'new breed' of 'direct drive' washing machines - an LG no less! Unfortunately, due to the direct drive motor/drum assembly (no belts, you know!) it seems to resonate at a rather 'Sifflötic' pitch which, as it speeds up, goes way beyond my 45 year old hearing!

 

.....That's progress :lol:

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Incidentally, I have no particular wish to spoil your fun, but as far as I can remember, there are only two instances of Franck specifying the use of a Céleste in his entire organ works.

 

There is one other that I am familiar with; for the closing 30-odd bars of the Andantino in G minor, Franck indicates Voix Céleste et le tremblant.

JC

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I have no particular wish to spoil your fun, but as far as I can remember, there are only two instances of Franck specifying the use of a Céleste in his entire organ works

 

You may well be right - I'm certainly not pedantic enough to troll through the whole set to check.

However, there are certainly lots of indications to use 'Voix Humaine', 'Voix Humaine et Tremblant', or 'Tremblant'.

I have always assumed that these 3 mean the same thing - Vox + Trem.

The CF works which I play are from wide variety of editions; mostly old Novello. I recently bought the excellent value Dover complete works to do the Grande Piece Symphonique, but find that I still go back to the copies from which I originally learned to play the rest of the repertoire - must be something to do with the layout and the page turns.

 

DT

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Guest Echo Gamba
I have a nice shiny Bellini toaster. However, the washing machine does not appear to interact with it in any way.

 

Incidentally, I have no particular wish to spoil your fun, but as far as I can remember, there are only two instances of Franck specifying the use of a Céleste in his entire organ works; as it happens, both appear in the Grande Pièce Symphonique; the first at the start of the second Andante section and the other is fifty eight and a half bars later, shortly before the grand restatement of the theme in the major.

 

 

OK - so I am having a bit of a slow evening....

 

I presume some of your appliences are wall mounted.....? :lol: (Think about it!)

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I don't see it in this edition, which, whilst not the original, is nevertheless an early French one.

 

Yes, your edition is certainly different from mine. I have just listened to two recordings I have - David Sanger uses a céleste at that point whereas Colin Walsh does not. I do not know which is correct, but having tried Céleste on its own and Flûtes 8,4 plus trem, I find either satisfactory. The fact that my edition reads Voix Celeste and tremulant makes me suspect it is an error. Confusing isn't it?

JC

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