Jump to content
Mander Organ Builders Forum

Organs In Books


davidh

Recommended Posts

Jack Higgins's 'The Eagle has landed' has a Bach-playing German paratrooper in it (he gets shot in mid-Orgelbuchlein, if I remember rightly, both in the book and in the film). A good read, although why the author made the blunder of claiming that a medieval church in north Norfolk had missed out on the Reformation, I can't imagine. There are some spikey shacks up there that would make most RC churches look like Gospel Halls, but they're all Anglican, after a fashion.

 

I, too, loved 'A Swarm in May' and recently acquired my own copy on Ebay. Unfortunately, all the units of measurement have been converted into metric, which jars slightly. I think it must be in 'Chroster's Cake' that there's a drawing of the organ loft - definitely Canterbury, but only three manuals, which was one less than it had in those days!

 

I wonder who was the inspiration for Dr. Sunderland, the organist?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Edmund Crispin (the pen name of Bruce Montgomery) an organist/choirmaster at St Johns College, Oxford, in the first half of last century wrote some rather whimsical detective novels. One named "Holy Disorders" includes the vibrations of the 32' in an organ of a rural cathedral used to dislodge a slab (under which if I recall correctly) a dead body is found.... At one stage he was the regular crime writer for the Sunday Times.

Organs get odd mention in some of the less known works of Dickens I recall. To this day I enjoy referring to my own place as the kinfreederal, after the urchin in one of Dickens lesser known tomes. Has a sort of 'cor blimey' ring to it!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Robert Schneider's "Schlafes Bruder" (Brother of Sleep, a worse movie version exists, too) should be available in English, too. It is quite fascinating story of an Austrian mountain village and a young genious with a special gift of hearing, secretly starting to play the organ and even participating in an improvisation contest.

The author is the brother to Enjott Schneider, Professor of Movie composition in Munich, who wrote a Toccata "Schlafes Bruder" for that movie.

The depiction of a genious in an absolutely provincial surrounding (here: The province of Vorarlberg, the region where the Rieger organ factory is located today) is touching.

 

Wasn't Jules Verne's "20,000 Leagues beyond the Sea" and Captain Nemo from the Nautilus submarine with its house organ mentioned elsewhere?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Robert Schneider's "Schlafes Bruder" (Brother of Sleep, a worse movie version exists, too) should be available in English, too. It is quite fascinating story of an Austrian mountain village and a young genious with a special gift of hearing, secretly starting to play the organ and even participating in an improvisation contest.

The author is the brother to Enjott Schneider, Professor of Movie composition in Munich, who wrote a Toccata "Schlafes Bruder" for that movie.

The depiction of a genious in an absolutely provincial surrounding (here: The province of Vorarlberg, the region where the Rieger organ factory is located today) is touching.

 

Wasn't Jules Verne's "20,000 Leagues beyond the Sea" and Captain Nemo from the Nautilus submarine with its house organ mentioned elsewhere?

 

For anyone not familiar with it I would recommend Robert N. Roth's superb anthology "Wond'rous Machine" (Scarecrow Press, Lanham (Md) and London, 2000. It is a collection of text relating to the organ, including poems, short stories, mysteries and extracts from novels.

 

Graham Dukes

Oslo

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...