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English Bicknor, Herefordshire


DaveHarries
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Hi,

 

The NPOR does not give a builder or year of construction for the organ at English Bicknor, Forest of Dean. But it has 20 Pedal keys, 56 notes on the first manual and 42 keys on the 2nd manual. Also what is described as an ugly case of zinc pipes.

 

Any guesses as to the age on that one in light of the compass?

 

http://npor.rcm.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi?...ec_index=N05706

 

Dave

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Hi,

 

The NPOR does not give a builder or year of construction for the organ at English Bicknor, Forest of Dean. But it has 20 Pedal keys, 56 notes on the first manual and 42 keys on the 2nd manual. Also what is described as an ugly case of zinc pipes.

 

Any guesses as to the age on that one in light of the compass?

 

http://npor.rcm.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi?...ec_index=N05706

 

Dave

 

Roy Williamson, in his book 'The Organs of Gloucestershire', (Published by the Author, 2008) page 150 notes that "In 1855 the then vicar put an organ in the church on the understanding that it was his property which he could remove when he wished". He goes on to suggest that it could be the present organ which "with its non-overhanging manuals, square stop shanks and curious script and decoration on the stop labels is clearly old". He identifies it as deserving of a proper organological survey because some of the pipes are of earlier date and unknown provenance.

 

This does not answer the question but the Forest of Dean has several interesting instruments such as the case in Parkend (ex Chair case from Sailsbury Cathedral) and the Telford of Dublin organ in Clearwell church.

 

PJW

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Hi,

 

The NPOR does not give a builder or year of construction for the organ at English Bicknor, Forest of Dean. But it has 20 Pedal keys, 56 notes on the first manual and 42 keys on the 2nd manual. Also what is described as an ugly case of zinc pipes.

 

Any guesses as to the age on that one in light of the compass?

 

http://npor.rcm.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi?...ec_index=N05706

 

Dave

 

Hi

 

Dating is going to be a problem! The first question is if the Great compass was originally from GG. If it was, taken with the short pedal compass and the TC swell, then I'd be looking at somewhere between c.1790 and c.1830 - but it could be later. If the Great originally had C-compass, then it's mor elikely to be post 1850. Knowing the builder, etc. would also help - for obvious reasons. Also, was it originally built for the church or elsewhere?

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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