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Exciting Project In Glasgow


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Why a "baroque" instrument? I don't remember much about it, but there was a pipe organ in there before, NPOR showing it as having been removed in 1990, soon after the University acquired the building. It is, indeed, laudable that they recognise the importance of such an instrument; it does make me wonder what has changed during the last 19 years. Perhaps someone else knows more about that instrument, as NPOR doesn't have any details beyond 3 manuals and pedal, by Brindley and Foster.

 

The Glasgow Royal Concert Hall uses an electronic instrument when required, but it is never satisfactory.

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Guest Stanley Monkhouse

Ir was rebuilt by H&H so taking on a typical H&H spec: open woods, ophicleides, choir/solo wth orch reeds and Tuba, Gt with trombas 8,4, usual swell. See NPOR N11998. I heard Rawsthorne (I think) recite on it back in the 1960s. Lovely church (used to be anyway) near the CofS cathedral, like a JL Pearson, but (I think) by Burnet.

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Ir was rebuilt by H&H so taking on a typical H&H spec: open woods, ophicleides, choir/solo wth orch reeds and Tuba, Gt with trombas 8,4, usual swell. See NPOR N11998. I heard Rawsthorne (I think) recite on it back in the 1960s. Lovely church (used to be anyway) near the CofS cathedral, like a JL Pearson, but (I think) by Burnet.

 

Any idea why it was removed?

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I don't think this has been announced here until now.

 

http://www.strath.ac.uk/music/baronyorganproject/

 

40 stops of Koegler heading to the West of Scotland is very exciting indeed!

 

Greetings

 

Bazuin

 

In view of the thread in "Nuts and bolts" regarding the ergonomics of consoles, and stop jambs in particular, what do people think of how this console is shaping up? Scroll down to the bottom of the above link: there are pictures of the console taking shape.

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In view of the thread in "Nuts and bolts" regarding the ergonomics of consoles, and stop jambs in particular, what do people think of how this console is shaping up? Scroll down to the bottom of the above link: there are pictures of the console taking shape.

 

 

Why are we so obsessed with typically insular notions of console ergonomics, particuarly with such things as angled stop jambs?

 

If we have the confidence to commission on overseas builder to build an organ - and in this case a 'baroque organ' - why don't we allow him to build it in his own style - which presumably means straight stop jambs - instead of asking him to conform to what, to him, is an alien aesthetic? Why not respect the integrity of the builder's overall concept, uncompromising as it may be in some respects?

 

JS

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I don't know why the Harrison was removed from the Barony, it had a good reputation I think. As far as I know it was the RCO's examining organ in Scotland in times gone past.

 

I have played one organ of Koegler, in Helsinki - the first organ in Europe to be tuned to Bradley Lehmann's Bach temperament. The quality is exceptional, as you would expect with anything in which Bernhardt Edskes is involved. The Glasgow organ will be one of, perhaps, the half a dozen most important new organs built in the UK since the war. It will provide a teaching facility for RSAMD which will make it the envy of the other UK Conservatories.

 

"Why a "baroque" instrument?"

 

I wish the description was more specific, the Helsinki instrument was clearly central-German influenced but with some North German touches (a Dulzian as the reed on the second manual). It will be a stunning, thought-provoking organ which will allow the invitation of players who otherwise wouldn't be invited in the UK, as well as providing a world-class teaching facility. And the baroque repertoire from any part of Europe isn't catered for in Glasgow. At all.

 

This is going to be a real head-turner, folks.

 

Greetings

 

Bazuin

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Ir was rebuilt by H&H so taking on a typical H&H spec: open woods, ophicleides, choir/solo wth orch reeds and Tuba, Gt with trombas 8,4, usual swell. See NPOR N11998. I heard Rawsthorne (I think) recite on it back in the 1960s. Lovely church (used to be anyway) near the CofS cathedral, like a JL Pearson, but (I think) by Burnet.

 

Couldn't find NPOR N11998 or any reference to this Harrison on the website.....

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  • 9 months later...
In view of the thread in "Nuts and bolts" regarding the ergonomics of consoles, and stop jambs in particular, what do people think of how this console is shaping up? Scroll down to the bottom of the above link: there are pictures of the console taking shape.

 

Difficult to tell at this stage. I do hope the ruckpositiv stops are going to be behind the bench on the back of the RP case. Shove couplers too perhaps?

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Oh yes - and no electricity anywhere near it, organists wearing 'period' clothes and shoes, be sure to have your brain reset to +200 years ago (so forget about your current means of communication/transport/existence etc..).

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Oh yes - and no electricity anywhere near it, organists wearing 'period' clothes and shoes, be sure to have your brain reset to +200 years ago (so forget about your current means of communication/transport/existence etc..).

 

Well, as far as a baroque organ designed for baroque music is concerned, do we

really need that "Brol" ?

 

("Brol" means: an useless pile of things of doubtfull quality).

 

If I was given free hand in a church, I'd have a Bach organ AND a modern one

(with all the gadgetry), both consequently developped in a credible way.

One may like electric windows, powersteering etc in a Cadillac, while at the same

time enjoy an MG, naked as it is.

 

Pierre

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Oh yes - and no electricity anywhere near it, organists wearing 'period' clothes and shoes, be sure to have your brain reset to +200 years ago (so forget about your current means of communication/transport/existence etc..).

... when the fastest thing in everyone's daily experience was a horse and the pace of life was altogether slower.

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... when the fastest thing in everyone's daily experience was a horse and the pace of life was altogether slower.

 

...and organ blowers pumped away all day for a flagon of small beer. :)

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I am intrigued by the HW Mixtur VI "mit Vorabzug 16".

 

Presumably this means the stop, fully drawn, gives an 8-foot based mixture, but the pre- or half-draw gives a 16-foot based composition.

 

Is this just a case of an octave transposition? If so, how do they achieve it?

 

JS

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