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Lubricating Organ Blowers


Ian Ball
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Hi

 

Does anyone know how one should lubricate a BOB TOT2 organ blower driven by a Brook Crompton Parkinson 2800 rpm motor? The cap over the end of the shaft is fixed by three screws and there is no obvious flip-up oil cap as one would find on some other types of blower. The bearings and end of shaft look spotless and grease free so I'm wondering if it should be oiled elsewhere.

 

It runs fine but I don't know how long it is since it was in regular use and I don't want to burn the house down...

 

Also, what's the best oil to use? I've heard 3-in-1 can be disastrous.

 

Many thanks

 

Ian

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Hi

 

Does anyone know how one should lubricate a BOB TOT2 organ blower driven by a Brook Crompton Parkinson 2800 rpm motor? The cap over the end of the shaft is fixed by three screws and there is no obvious flip-up oil cap as one would find on some other types of blower. The bearings and end of shaft look spotless and grease free so I'm wondering if it should be oiled elsewhere.

 

It runs fine but I don't know how long it is since it was in regular use and I don't want to burn the house down...

 

Also, what's the best oil to use? I've heard 3-in-1 can be disastrous.

 

Many thanks

 

Ian

 

Some of these have sealed for life bearings. You'l know if they're worn when you turn it on. If you have one with oiling points, chain oil for chain saws is the right sort of viscosity.

 

AJS

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Guest Cynic
Some of these have sealed for life bearings. You'l know if they're worn when you turn it on. If you have one with oiling points, chain oil for chain saws is the right sort of viscosity.

 

AJS

 

 

At all costs avoid 3-in-1 or similar penetrating oils - such things help to wear your bearings out!

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If your motor has no oil ports it means the bearings have been pre-packed with grease. You can expect 30,000 hours of use at 80°C bearing temp. before they would require more grease. If you know the history of the motor you should be able to work out whether it needs such attention.

For the smaller Compton-Parkinson motors (of frame size 80 - 180), EA6Polyurea should be used, and for the larger ones (200-355) Esso Unirex N3.

 

Do not try to pour oil on the shaft as this will either just end up sprayed around the inside of the motor collecting dirt or dilute the grease if it gets into the bearing housing.

 

For the older plain bearing type of motors that do have oil ports, the viscosity of the oil should be in proportion to the size of the shaft and weight supported. These hydrodynamic bearings work by squeezing a layer of oil between the rotating shaft and the bearing case, so that the there is no metal contact when the shaft is turning at its operating speed. If the oil is too thin, it will not be able to support the shaft. A shaft of a typical old blower motor is around 3 cm in diameter and oil such as used for chain saws would be too thin. An engine oil would be better.

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Although the only tribological advice it offers is that the motors should be lubricated in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and I don't think Ian has a copy. :unsure:

Yes I looked there when trying to wire the thing up and it's pretty vague, general advice.

 

Have used the blower (actually, as a sucker for my Apollo reed organ, fed from the inlet at the side of the fan) for a couple of days now and it runs very sweetly with no hint of overheating. The old cast iron blower simply wasn't up to the job and made it sound like a rusty old squeeze box. The newer one, however, complete with upgraded blower box and Wickes' finest laundry tubing and accessories, makes the Apollo sound and feel fabulous. Warm and sonorous on a wooden floor and more responsive/controllable than 90% of the tracker organs I've ever played! And I would never, ever bother with an electronic instrument having experienced a well-set up reed organ.

 

That's enough work-avoidance...

 

Thanks again to all who offered advice.

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