Jump to content
Mander Organ Builders Forum

St Peter's Church, Petersham


Philip J Wells
 Share

Recommended Posts

The DoM at St Peter's is a member here and may like to comment.

 

Justason is depping on Sunday and had an hour on it this afternoon, but it was very cold. He or I will let you know more once he's had an above-freezing go at the weekend.

 

I can tell you that the inaugural recital is being given by Thomas Trotter, to be followed in the spring with recitals by Simon Preston and Christopher Herrick.

 

Best wishes

 

J

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The DoM at St Peter's is a member here and may like to comment.

 

Justason is depping on Sunday and had an hour on it this afternoon, but it was very cold. He or I will let you know more once he's had an above-freezing go at the weekend.

 

Indeed, I am DoM at Petersham, and the new organ has been in use for two weeks now. In my (biased, of course ;) ) view, it is remarkably versatile for a small instrument, and seems to fit the building well, both visually and aurally. The action is very sensitive and rewarding to play. Beyond that, I will perhaps refrain from further comment until I've had a chance to play with a full church - which is about to happen (in fact 4 times in the next 36 hours!) I'm very grateful to Justason for relieving me of my duties on Sunday - and will of course be interested to hear his (less biased :rolleyes: ) view!

 

JJK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Indeed, I am DoM at Petersham, and the new organ has been in use for two weeks now. In my (biased, of course :rolleyes: ) view, it is remarkably versatile for a small instrument, and seems to fit the building well, both visually and aurally. The action is very sensitive and rewarding to play.

What an interesting stoplist! So many possibilities! This might be an influential instrument for British organ builders. A couple of questions:

 

Is there a tremulant? Perhaps I missed it. I'd like two, really.

 

Does "Bass acoustic" for the 16' Basson on the Résonance mean half-length resonators?

 

Good luck for your Christmas services and the opening celebrity recitals.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What an interesting stoplist! So many possibilities! This might be an influential instrument for British organ builders. A couple of questions:

 

Is there a tremulant? Perhaps I missed it. I'd like two, really.

 

Does "Bass acoustic" for the 16' Basson on the Résonance mean half-length resonators?

 

Good luck for your Christmas services and the opening celebrity recitals.

 

 

What fun - can I have one please. Is the NPOR spec. up to date and maybe some pics would be nice?

 

Cheers

A

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What an interesting stoplist! So many possibilities! This might be an influential instrument for British organ builders. A couple of questions:

 

Is there a tremulant? Perhaps I missed it. I'd like two, really.

 

Does "Bass acoustic" for the 16' Basson on the Résonance mean half-length resonators?

 

Good luck for your Christmas services and the opening celebrity recitals.

 

Thank you.

 

There is indeed a tremulant - operating on the whole organ. Two would have been nice, but not possible with the winding system adopted. There is also the all-essential Rossignol :rolleyes: . I must send an update to BIOS. The only other change is that the Sesquialtera is actually named Cornet.

 

Yes, the Basson has half-length resonators in the bass - and doesn't seem to suffer for this, in this rather small building. Height was certainly not available for any pipes longer than 8'.

 

The Gambe has haskelled basses, and it is rather nice to have good foundation tone right down to bottom C.

 

The opening recital will be Sat 24th April with Thomas Trotter, Simon Preston on 26 June (with a small orchestra) and Christopher Herrick on 25 Sept. Further information, when available, will be on www.petershamfestival.org and www.organrecitals.com

 

JJK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Hector5
Thank you.

 

There is indeed a tremulant - operating on the whole organ. Two would have been nice, but not possible with the winding system adopted. There is also the all-essential Rossignol :rolleyes: . I must send an update to BIOS. The only other change is that the Sesquialtera is actually named Cornet.

 

Yes, the Basson has half-length resonators in the bass - and doesn't seem to suffer for this, in this rather small building. Height was certainly not available for any pipes longer than 8'.

 

The Gambe has haskelled basses, and it is rather nice to have good foundation tone right down to bottom C.

 

The opening recital will be Sat 24th April with Thomas Trotter, Simon Preston on 26 June (with a small orchestra) and Christopher Herrick on 25 Sept. Further information, when available, will be on www.petershamfestival.org and www.organrecitals.com

 

JJK

 

Are there any photographs available??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What fun - can I have one please. Is the NPOR spec. up to date and maybe some pics would be nice?

 

Cheers

A

 

I will try to sort out something on Picasa - I have quite a few pictures of the construction which need to be sifted. But I fear it will not be before January....

JJK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will try to sort out something on Picasa - I have quite a few pictures of the construction which need to be sifted. But I fear it will not be before January....

JJK

 

Thanks in anticipation!

 

A

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will try to sort out something on Picasa - I have quite a few pictures of the construction which need to be sifted. But I fear it will not be before January....

JJK

Thanks for the info so far. I look forward to seeing the pictures. Who drew up the interesting specification and was an organ consultant involved?

 

PJW

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info so far. I look forward to seeing the pictures. Who drew up the interesting specification and was an organ consultant involved?

 

PJW

I drew up a proposed stop list having heard and played some similar (although larger) instruments by St Martin in Switzerland. But St Martin deserve the credit for turning this initial idea into something concrete, and fitting it into our somewhat awkward space. The Resonance division is something of a speciality of theirs, but the physical disposition is different in every example I've seen. In our case, the Resonance is split across two boxes either side of the central Recit box. We've had a great team on this project, including our consultant, Ian Bell.

JJK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I drew up a proposed stop list having heard and played some similar (although larger) instruments by St Martin in Switzerland. But St Martin deserve the credit for turning this initial idea into something concrete, and fitting it into our somewhat awkward space. The Resonance division is something of a speciality of theirs, but the physical disposition is different in every example I've seen. In our case, the Resonance is split across two boxes either side of the central Recit box. We've had a great team on this project, including our consultant, Ian Bell.

JJK

I keep thinking of new (obviously theoretical, as I haven't seen or played this instrument) ways of using the stops, both for solo organ music (baroque, Romantic. modern) and for liturgical use. Very exciting! A few years ago I went through a phase of drawing up schemes for small English Parish Church organs based on a list of musical requirements. You seem to have ticked an enormous number of boxes with this one, particularly by changing the Sesquialtera to a Cornet! :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lawrence accompanied the service this morning and I assisted, turning pages and pulling an occasional stop.

 

The organ sounds very well in its location, which has a dry acoustic, and I think the church should be (and clearly is) proud of its new acquisition.

 

There was no choir today but the instrument was happy accompanying a small congregation in the hymns. I understand it coped equally well with several full-houses over Christmas.

 

It is essentially a two-manual organ with an extra resonance division. Lawrence says the white keys are quite short, and the tracker action is light. He played Bach, Mendelssohn and Langlais, each of which sounded pleasing, and the voluntary drew a round of applause.

 

I think its a versatile instrument, well-voiced and pretty much ideal in its setting.

 

I have a small quibble, but only because I'm a non-organist and last-port assistant. The stop labels are on the jambs beneath the stops so when standing up I could not see what any of them were. This isn't going to bother anyone who knows what they are doing (unlike me).

 

So all in all a terrific little organ of quality, and a wonderful asset and resource for St Peter's.

 

Happy New Year

 

J

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lawrence accompanied the service this morning and I assisted, turning pages and pulling an occasional stop.

 

Thank you Justadad, and especially Justason :lol: ! I hope it wasn't too freezing cold on Sunday - we seemed to have a bit of a problem with the heating system over Christmas :blink:

 

I have a small quibble, but only because I'm a non-organist and last-port assistant. The stop labels are on the jambs beneath the stops so when standing up I could not see what any of them were. This isn't going to bother anyone who knows what they are doing (unlike me).

 

Although I am currently in Istanbul - and my memory can be pretty bad - I am pretty sure each stop label is above the related stop, not beneath? I certainly hope so! Of course, even so, I realise that your view of the labels could be blocked by stops above the label - I guess an inevitable consequence problem of not having labels on the ends of the knobs. I suppose that to an extent one has to accept the house style of the builder concerned - and there is the compensating advantage of have larger text than could be fitted on the drawknob disc.

 

Thank you, and Happy New Year

 

JJK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As promised, I have put some photos onto Picasa; they can be seen here:

picasaweb.google.com/jkingan2/PetershamOrgan#

Apologies for the somewhat variable quality - they're just a few opportunistic snaps taken along the way. I do not yet have any pictures of the completed organ - I hope to take some later this week to show the whole thing after the return of the centre pews, a better photo of the console and of the fully populated soundboards.

 

Anyone interested to see/hear/play the organ do let me know.

 

JJK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As promised, I have put some photos onto Picasa; they can be seen here:

picasaweb.google.com/jkingan2/PetershamOrgan#

Apologies for the somewhat variable quality - they're just a few opportunistic snaps taken along the way. I do not yet have any pictures of the completed organ - I hope to take some later this week to show the whole thing after the return of the centre pews, a better photo of the console and of the fully populated soundboards.

 

Anyone interested to see/hear/play the organ do let me know.

 

JJK

 

Thanks - 'looks quite splendid.

 

A

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lawrence spent another couple of hours on the St Peter's St Martin, yesterday, preparing for exams this week. (Fortunately, it has a straight pedal board just like the exam organ, and unlike his usual instrument.)

 

He really liked the way the Bach (Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir BWV 686) and Mendelssohn (Andante recitativo and Allegro assai vivace from Sonata in F minor, Op. 65 No.1) - especially the Allegro - sounded on it, and the Alain (Scherzo from Suite) worked too.

 

Well worth a visit, I should say, especially when the weather warms-up.

 

Best wishes

 

J

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As promised, I have put some photos onto Picasa; they can be seen here:

picasaweb.google.com/jkingan2/PetershamOrgan#

 

JJK

 

Many thanks for taking the time and trouble to upload these and sharing them with us. There are some interesting shots there such as the haskelled bass and parts of the suspended action. What an inprovement on the looks of the old organ.

PJW

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Many thanks for taking the time and trouble to upload these and sharing them with us. There are some interesting shots there such as the haskelled bass and parts of the suspended action. What an inprovement on the looks of the old organ.

PJW

 

No problem. I braved the snow this morning to get some further shots of the completed instrument - appended here:

picasaweb.google.com/jkingan2/PetershamOrgan#

JJK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
I note that this church now has a newly installed 3M+P 16 stops organ by St. Martin of Switzerland. Details on the NPOR at

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=P00563 . Anybody heard/played it?

 

PJW

 

I had the pleasure of visiting the church - thanks to JJK's hospitality - and of playing and hearing the organ last Saturday morning.

 

This is indeed an impressive and exciting new instrument, not least as a visual adornment to this historic Georgian/Victorian church. The tonal design is ingenious with Manual II (Récit) and III (enclosed Résonance) offering a most versatilite 'split Swell' division. A comprehensive range of couplers is provided - including III to Ped and III to Ped 4 - offering Pedal reeds at 16-8-8-4, all under expression. The voicing is warm and relaxed - any tendency to forcefulness would be a disaster in the non-resonant interior crammed with wooden galleries and box pews. The suspended action is very comfortable to play, with a reassuring 'bottom' to the touch, not always found with this sort of action. The console layout is logical and uncluttered.

 

Given the rather bland menu that mainstream English builders might have served up with 16 stops, this strikes me as a most welcome newcomer from Switzerland.

 

Tom Trotter gives the opening recital in April, with further concerts by Simon Preston (Handel organ concertos) and Christopher Herrick.

 

JS

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had the pleasure of visiting the church - thanks to JJK's hospitality - and of playing and hearing the organ last Saturday morning.

 

Thank you John - nice to put a face to a name!

 

I am more than happy to show other board members the organ - just let me know if you would like to visit. If there is enough interest, then maybe an "open day" would be worthwhile...

 

Details of recitals are here: Petersham Festival - I hope to have it updated with times and ticketing details very soon

 

JJK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A fascinating organ - very thought-provoking. Thanks for sharing the details.

 

Just a quick question ... what's the rationale for the 8' flute on the Resonance? Is it a solo flute, or a displaced pedal stop etc?

 

Somehow it looks all on its own, on paper at least!

 

SC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A fascinating organ - very thought-provoking. Thanks for sharing the details.

 

Just a quick question ... what's the rationale for the 8' flute on the Resonance? Is it a solo flute, or a displaced pedal stop etc?

 

Somehow it looks all on its own, on paper at least!

 

SC

 

Yes it does look a bit odd, but it is actually very useful. It is an open flute, of a romantic character. I have to say it is not quite as forceful in the treble as either I or the organ builders anticipated; nonetheless it works very well as a solo voice against the strings of the Recit. It also works nicely as a quiet pedal 8' - blending well with the Soubasse. It can also be coupled to the pedal at the octave to give a 4' solo (for example, I recently used it in this way for the third movement of Widor V). Or it can be added at 4' pitch to the 16-8 pedal stops to give a 16-8-4 chorus.

 

JJK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...