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Cathedral To Close For 4 1/2 Years


John Sayer
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They do things differently in Germany!

 

The Cathedral in Hildesheim, rebuilt after wartime destruction in 1945, is to close from January 2010 to August 2014 for thoroughgoing restoration (Sanierung) at a cost of 30 million euros.

 

For those interested in details of the 4m Klais organ see Hildesheim Dom.

 

Can you imagine that sort of thing happening at Canterbury, say?

 

JS

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They do things differently in Germany!

 

The Cathedral in Hildesheim, rebuilt after wartime destruction in 1945, is to close from January 2010 to August 2014 for thoroughgoing restoration (Sanierung) at a cost of 30 million euros.

 

For those interested in details of the 4m Klais organ see Hildesheim Dom.

 

Can you imagine that sort of thing happening at Canterbury, say?

 

JS

 

 

There is another fine organ in Hildesheim; that of the St Andreas-Kirche. This is a IV/63 stop Von Beckerath of 1965 vintage. I remember playing this fine instument during my student days, and there is a very good Telarc recording of it from 1985, Telarc CD-80127.

The clarity of the choruses make it absolutely beautiful for Bach. An instrument worth hearing!

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There is another fine organ in Hildesheim; that of the St Andreas-Kirche. This is a IV/63 stop Von Beckerath of 1965 vintage. I remember playing this fine instument during my student days, and there is a very good Telarc recording of it from 1985, Telarc CD-80127.

The clarity of the choruses make it absolutely beautiful for Bach. An instrument worth hearing!

 

An historic organ, no doubt. It is to be hoped they won't imagine needs to

blow wind in the room there and change all for the sake of "things must be changed"

pathology...

I have recordings of this fine organ, but this said, as far as Bach is concerned,

it is about to the Antipodes to the organs Bach played. It is a 20th century organ,

suited to the music of the 20th century before anything else.

 

Pierre

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  • 5 years later...

The restoration of the Cathedral at Hildesheim has now been completed and was solemnly opened on August 15th 2015, the Feast of the Assumption of Mary, and the titular feast of the Cathedral.

 

The new organ, built by Seifert of Kevelaer, has also been completed.

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Wiki says that the cathedral recently reopened after a 4 1/2 years restoration.

 

A difference between English cathedrals and many continental ones is that English cathedrals are used rather a lot for services, whereas one could go to some major cathedrals in France, for example, and see "Messe 1000" each day and nothing else.. Without the daily round, it would be easier to close a building completely.

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There is another fine organ in Hildesheim; that of the St Andreas-Kirche. This is a IV/63 stop Von Beckerath of 1965 vintage. I remember playing this fine instument during my student days, and there is a very good Telarc recording of it from 1985, Telarc CD-80127.

The clarity of the choruses make it absolutely beautiful for Bach. An instrument worth hearing!

I have that CD, its a Michael Murray one, playing Bach, its still a favourite of mine. Not heard it for a while tho

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They do things differently in Germany!

 

The Cathedral in Hildesheim, rebuilt after wartime destruction in 1945, is to close from January 2010 to August 2014 for thoroughgoing restoration (Sanierung) at a cost of 30 million euros.

 

For those interested in details of the 4m Klais organ see Hildesheim Dom.

 

Can you imagine that sort of thing happening at Canterbury, say?

 

JS

The Germans take their organs more seriously than we do, unfortunately.

 

I've mentioned this before: Cologne Cathedral = 3000, possibly 4000 (including people sitting on camp chairs in the aisles) for a Messiaen(!) recital; British organ recitals might be lucky to attract 100.

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A difference between English cathedrals and many continental ones is that English cathedrals are used rather a lot for services, whereas one could go to some major cathedrals in France, for example, and see "Messe 1000" each day and nothing else.. Without the daily round, it would be easier to close a building completely.

 

I hadn't seen the wiki article. I had my information from a Kantor friend who lives, nearby, in Barsinghausen and who was at the opening. He took me to Hildesheim Cathedral when I was lecturing in Hannover quite some time ago..

 

I think that there is some truth in what you say although most French Cathedrals, in my experience, have Messe (usually at 10h00!) but often an early or midday too, every day and also say the two main offices, usually in a side chapel which, very often, isn't advertised. Quickly looking through a number of UK cathedrals for the programme for yesterday most did exactly that, the difference being that the evening office was sung and everything was advertised!

 

In France, of course, there is another matter to consider. French Cathedrals are owned by the state not by the Roman Catholic church who only administer to the spiritual needs of those attending. Somewhere, presumably in an office in Paris, there is a list of 'Cathedrals to be renovated' and also, presumably 'Organs to be restored' - you submit your proposals and, when your turn comes around the job is done - and paid for by the state. (an oversimplification I'm sure!) Up to 20 odd years ago very little restoration work had been done, in the country, as opposed to in Paris. I remember being at Amiens and seeing Messe celebrated on, almost, an orange box! The Cathedral was in a poor state of repair - then a comprehensive 'restoration' took place of the Cathedral to its present state. Even now the organ has not had work done to it since, I stand corrected if I'm wrong, before the war (1936, I think!) Chartres Cathedral is undergoing a major restoration at the moment - and has been kept open. Interestingly, like Hildesheim, Chartres is also a 'World Heritage Site'. The situation in Germany I have no idea but I know of the wonderful restorations in Dresden of the Frauenkirche.

 

My village church (sans orgue) is being restored at the moment. It has been closed for over a year and Messe was last said there early in 2014. It's tiny, but a building of major historical importance, being 1000 years old, an old 'Templar' church and on one of the routes to Santiago di Compostella. Restored is an interesting word - and I have been watching the work they have been doing - English Heritage would have a fit!

 

Various contributors have noted the difference between the UK and our continental counterparts - it's true - we do it differently! - sometimes for the better but not always!

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Hello,

A difference between English cathedrals and many continental ones is that English cathedrals are used rather a lot for services, whereas one could go to some major cathedrals in France, for example, and see "Messe 1000" each day and nothing else.. Without the daily round, it would be easier to close a building completely.

 

take a look at Freiburg Cathedral. The services are daily at 7:00, 8:00, 18:30. Sundays at 7:00, 8:00, 10:00, 12:00, 20:00.

 

Cheers

tiratutti

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