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William Albright


Peter Clark
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Prompted by a frequent contributor to this forum I recently downloaded the CD of this suite (the composer calls it a "Ballet for Organ") from Amazon and now I have ordered the score - which ain't cheap folks! - and wonder if any others play it? It seems a strange yet wholly succesful mixture of jazz, ragtime, "churchy" music, theatrical burlesque and modern American - hints of Copeland it at least one movement.

 

Worth checking out.

 

I also commend the music of Fedrick Sixten as discussed on another thread. I've just got his Tango and Toccata Festival.

 

Incidentally I can't be the only one whose expenditure on music has increased considerably since joing this forum!

 

Peter

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Prompted by a frequent contributor to this forum I recently downloaded the CD of this suite (the composer calls it a "Ballet for Organ") from Amazon and now I have ordered the score - which ain't cheap folks! - and wonder if any others play it? It seems a strange yet wholly succesful mixture of jazz, ragtime, "churchy" music, theatrical burlesque and modern American - hints of Copeland it at least one movement.

 

I also commend the music of Fedrick Sixten as discussed on another thread. I've just got his Tango and Toccata Festival.

 

Incidentally I can't be the only one whose expenditure on music has increased considerably since joing this forum!

 

A well timed posting as my postman delivered this morning, the Tango and Sonata from the very same place. Is someone on commission here...........

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Flights of Fancy just set me back almost £30.00 - Edition Peters - but I think worth it. What Albright do you play?:

 

Peter

Totendanz - without looking at the name - meaning "Toe Dance" - was the last piece I learnt, I also have a piece called Sweet Sixteenths - a rag for organ in the style of Joplin - both pieces good for encores.

 

Gympie

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Guest Patrick Coleman
Totendanz - without looking at the name - meaning "Toe Dance" - was the last piece I learnt, I also have a piece called Sweet Sixteenths - a rag for organ in the style of Joplin - both pieces good for encores.

 

Gympie

 

'Dance of the Dead' - no need to guess the sort of concert for which that would serve as an encore! :(

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'Dance of the Dead' - no need to guess the sort of concert for which that would serve as an encore! :unsure:

 

Mmm - German is not one of my strong points. I am struglling with it and I need it (seriously) later in the year. I looked up a dictionary and yes it means Dance Macabre. I went and found the score and it is titled "Jig for Feet - (Totentanz)".

 

As the MM is for dotted crotchets at 120, it really is anything but macabre. So I am wondering if this is William's little joke.

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I don't know the piece, but macabre is not the same as funereal. The danse macabre implies an unbridled, lively irreverence, as of skeletons dancing souls to the grave.

 

I can't help seeing the Dupré G minor fugue in a rather similar sort of light, though the image that piece conjours up for me is rather one of ghoulish devils dancing wildy round a fire - particularly in the final section where the strettos kick in. Yes, a real devils' dance. Rather unsuitable for church really!

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I also commend the music of Fedrick Sixten as discussed on another thread. I've just got his Tango and Toccata Festival.

 

As already mentioned, I've also just taken possession of the Tango. However, can anyone explain the reference to Psalm 303 (yes, 303) in the title, or am I missing something blindingly obvious?

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As already mentioned, I've also just taken possession of the Tango. However, can anyone explain the reference to Psalm 303 (yes, 303) in the title, or am I missing something blindingly obvious?

It's a typo. My copy was amended to read Psalm 103 when Fredrik sent it. I've enjoyed playing that piece for quite a while now, and have got quite a lot of his other scores. All very good stuff indeed.

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As already mentioned, I've also just taken possession of the Tango. However, can anyone explain the reference to Psalm 303 (yes, 303) in the title, or am I missing something blindingly obvious?

 

I already asked him. Psalm means hymn in the Swedish hymnal and the Tango is based on that hymn tune.

 

Peter

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I already asked him. Psalm means hymn in the Swedish hymnal and the Tango is based on that hymn tune.

 

Peter

So I see! :blink:

 

To quote the good gentleman himself: 'This is a misunderstanding. The swedish word for Hymn is "Psalm". So what I refer to is the nr 103 in the Swedish Hymn book. Not the bible. The name of this hymn is "There is only one way to heaven, it´s the way through Jesus Christ"'

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It's a typo. My copy was amended to read Psalm 103 when Fredrik sent it. I've enjoyed playing that piece for quite a while now, and have got quite a lot of his other scores. All very good stuff indeed.

 

That's odd because when I wrote to him about this (on Facebook) he didn't suggest chaging the title. So what is it I wonder, 103 or 303? Not a major problem though as it is great piece.

 

Peter

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I can't help seeing the Dupré G minor fugue in a rather similar sort of light, though the image that piece conjours up for me is rather one of ghoulish devils dancing wildy round a fire - particularly in the final section where the strettos kick in. Yes, a real devils' dance. Rather unsuitable for church really!

 

The second phrase of the fugue subject is an inversion of the "Dies irae" beginning. When the entire subject comes in inverted, at first the semitone is in the wrong place. When the chorale from the prelude is quoted, however, it clearly tells its point of departure. So, it is more than possible that you're on to the master here.

 

Best,

Friedrich

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I already asked him. Psalm means hymn in the Swedish hymnal and the Tango is based on that hymn tune.

 

Peter

 

 

And I have a feeling that our Psalms are called Psalmen Davids or similar over that way generally. Fredrik Siten has also been heavily involved with the Swedish Hymnal which would also make the title of more sense to their organists than perhaps to us. I must admit that I had wondered what the hymn tune was like 'un tango'd'.

 

A

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That's odd because when I wrote to him about this (on Facebook) he didn't suggest chaging the title. So what is it I wonder, 103 or 303? Not a major problem though as it is great piece.

 

Peter

Interesting! His Facebook reply to me (above) also suggested it was psalm/hymn 103. On the front cover of mine, the number 103 has definitely been printed at a later stage next to the number 303 on the title page. Perhaps we should ask him again! You or I? :huh:

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The second phrase of the fugue subject is an inversion of the "Dies irae" beginning. When the entire subject comes in inverted, at first the semitone is in the wrong place. When the chorale from the prelude is quoted, however, it clearly tells its point of departure. So, it is more than possible that you're on to the master here.

 

Best,

Friedrich

I had never noticed this! Very interesting. Thank you!

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Interesting! His Facebook reply to me (above) also suggested it was psalm/hymn 103. On the front cover of mine, the number 103 has definitely been printed at a later stage next to the number 303 on the title page. Perhaps we should ask him again! You or I? :huh:

 

I have written to Fredrick asking for clarification. I'll post here as soon as I get a reply.

 

Peter

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