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Enrico Pasini - a new find, love it or hate it


Guest Hector5
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Guest Hector5

I happened upon this unusually melodious piece being played on You Tube this evening:

 

 

A tad sentimental, but hey the blue rinse ladies might like it. So, after a little more surfing I found the guy's website:

 

http://www.enricopasini.com/portal/

 

The astonishing thing is that much of the music is downloadable (if you have Sibelius) or printable through Scorch. There is much that is eminently missable but also quite a few bits and pieces which are quite appealing. There are about 30+ Cantabiles, most of them downloadable, and also available in print (I'd hate to be this guy's publisher). A word of warning - don't dismiss this guy out of hand because the first piece you hit on may be too cheesy. It's quite nice to hear some blue-sky tunes.

 

Enjoy!

 

Hector

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I think the old dears would love it!

 

Pity that a lot of scores (including the one for the piece on YouTube) don't seem to be readable with Scorch on any browser I try. Am I doing something wrong, I wonder... :huh:

 

It worked on mine.

 

A

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Think yourself fortunate indeed, Vox....

B)

<_<

 

Well, I played it to my lot as the opening voluntary this morning to put them in a good mood, as I wanted to ask them to contribute to my sponsored slim for Lent in aid of the organ fund. Several people afterwards commented favourably, and asked what the piece was.

 

Of course nobody would say that the music has great substance, but if it gets people listening favourably to the organ and enjoying the music it makes, that's a good thing in my book!

 

And they're sponsoring generously too! ;)

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Well, I played it to my lot as the opening voluntary this morning to put them in a good mood, as I wanted to ask them to contribute to my sponsored slim for Lent in aid of the organ fund.

Nah, don't believe you. Go on, admit it - you played it because you liked it! B)<_<

 

I must admit that, for something schmalzy, it has its place.

 

The difference between no.2 and no.30 seems to be confined to the closing bars. On the whole I think no.30 is an improvement, though that final RH chord is way out of character with the preceding harmonic style.

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Nah, don't believe you. Go on, admit it - you played it because you liked it! B)<_<

Ok, then! I do! ;) And the old girl made a really credible impression of a theatre organ too. ;)

 

I agree about the last chord, and am rather tempted to change it.

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I agree about the last chord, and am rather tempted to change it.

Me too. I'm normally dead against messing with other people's music, but playing D natural instead of D sharp softens the jolt a bit without significantly altering the general effect. (Still doesn't really sound right though.)

 

Judging from what he says on his website, there could conceivably be some programmatic reason for that last chord, but if we're not party to the programme we can't buy into it and in any case that's still no excuse for it not making musical sense.

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Judging from what he says on his website....

I was disappointed not to find any biographical details about the composer there, although perhaps I overlooked them. Google doesn't seem helpful either. Does anybody know anything about him?

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I was disappointed not to find any biographical details about the composer there, although perhaps I overlooked them. Google doesn't seem helpful either. Does anybody know anything about him?

According to John Henderson's directory, Pasini was born in Rome on 8 Aug 1933, studied at the S Cecilia Academy in Rome with Alfredo de Ninno and Fernando Germani. He is/was organist of S. Salvatore del Horta and professor at the conservatory in Cagliari. Henderson also states that some sources give 1936 as his year of birth.

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The difference between no.2 and no.30 seems to be confined to the closing bars. On the whole I think no.30 is an improvement, though that final RH chord is way out of character with the preceding harmonic style.

 

I notice a few differences in the registration instructions too - particularly the omission of some of the left-hand solo bits. I agree that overall no. 30 is an improvement - did the composer feel the need to alter it or write an amended version because he wasn't happy with the first one?

 

Neither ending seems to particularly fit in with the mood of what precedes it - I'd be tempted to end it on a complete F major chord somewhere (as the player did in the YouTube link in the OP).

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According to John Henderson's directory, Pasini was born in Rome on 8 Aug 1933, studied at the S Cecilia Academy in Rome with Alfredo de Ninno and Fernando Germani. He is/was organist of S. Salvatore del Horta and professor at the conservatory in Cagliari. Henderson also states that some sources give 1936 as his year of birth.

Thank you, Vox. That's just the sort of thing I was looking for. <_<

 

I notice a few differences in the registration instructions too - particularly the omission of some of the left-hand solo bits. I agree that overall no. 30 is an improvement - did the composer feel the need to alter it or write an amended version because he wasn't happy with the first one?

 

Neither ending seems to particularly fit in with the mood of what precedes it - I'd be tempted to end it on a complete F major chord somewhere (as the player did in the YouTube link in the OP).

I noticed 'left-hand solo bits' in another recording on YouTube

. I presume that this is 'Cantabile no. 2' and that the one the OP gave us is actually number 30, despite what it says.
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I notice a few differences in the registration instructions too - particularly the omission of some of the left-hand solo bits. I agree that overall no. 30 is an improvement - did the composer feel the need to alter it or write an amended version because he wasn't happy with the first one?

 

Neither ending seems to particularly fit in with the mood of what precedes it - I'd be tempted to end it on a complete F major chord somewhere (as the player did in the YouTube link in the OP).

I haven't been able to download a print of no.2 so I was going purely on the YouTube video. There are no LH solos there (and also the player may also be adapting the registration to the instrument). I think it quite likely that the composer wasn't totally happy with his first version. This is quite common amongst composers. I don't think I've ever been completely happy with anything I've written (though I don't count myself a composer).

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I noticed 'left-hand solo bits' in another recording on YouTube
. I presume that this is 'Cantabile no. 2' and that the one the OP gave us is actually number 30, despite what it says.

Ah, now that would make sense. <_< This version actually sounds more interesting to me.

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Albeit with a slightly altered - and more logical - ending! <_<

Stopping on the top F? Oh, but the descending phrase that follows is an essential part of the schmaltz! (wallow in it!) It's just the final Swell chord that needs rethinking (how about Dmin7 with C on top?). Actually, I think ending on a straight F major chord as in the first clip sounds decidely lame. The last chord definitely needs a little spice.

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Nah! I'd go for an F major 6th chord instead! :rolleyes:

 

I think I love it! The Sibelius playback version is far too fast. Final chord? Either a straight F major(or 6th) or 13th - e flat, g, b natural, d - tremulant and quick open and shut swell pedal.

 

yukky but could work

 

P

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I think the best suggestion so far is Holz's (which is effectively the same as my Dmin7, but presumably in a different position). However, Fmaj7 with C on top seems to work equally well and has some logic in that it reaffirms the right-hand E of the previous bar which is otherwise just thrown away.

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