Jump to content
Mander Organs

Recommended Posts

I imagine that quite a few members have seen this to my mind very promissing programme, which, underneath its (infrequent) crudeness suggests a lot of good theological sense and even spirituality. Adam's "min- sermons" to Colin, the alcoholic parishoner, seem characterised by good sense verging on the profound.

 

However as this is neither a theology discussion board nor one dedicated to sit-com, I just wonder which church it is that is featured -and we had a good shot of the organ case in this week's episode. I somehow think I might recognise the church as I worked for quite a while in London.

 

I initially thought of a Bermondsey church - St James? - but it is over 20 years now and have but a hazy recollection. The credits mentioned "St Leonards's" - but the only St Leonards I can think of right now is in Streatham.

 

Any ideas, folks?

 

Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just wonder which church it is that is featured -and we had a good shot of the organ case in this week's episode. I somehow think I might recognise the church as I worked for quite a while in London.

 

I initially thought of a Bermondsey church - St James? - but it is over 20 years now and have but a hazy recollection. The credits mentioned "St Leonards's" - but the only St Leonards I can think of right now is in Streatham.

 

Any ideas, folks?

 

Peter

 

All is explained here http://www.hackneygazette.co.uk/content/ha...3A07%3A49%3A240

 

Graham

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks Graham - one other question which as I am not Anglican I am unsure of the answer. Do archdeacons traditionally wear a pectoral cross?

 

Peter

 

gosh, my grammar and syntax went haywire there!

 

 

It's not normal. I've known a few and never seen them wear a pectoral cross.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks Graham - one other question which as I am not Anglican I am unsure of the answer. Do archdeacons traditionally wear a pectoral cross?

 

Peter

A review in The Times following the first episode described the Archdeacon as the Arch*bishop*. The reviewer obviously doesn't know the difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The writer of the programme seems to have his finger on the pulse of current happenings in today's church life, from the `Parish Share' to the `Charismatics'. It is worth seeing the programme twice over as there can be some subtleties missed on the first viewing.

 

Frank Fowler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks Graham - one other question which as I am not Anglican I am unsure of the answer. Do archdeacons traditionally wear a pectoral cross?

 

Peter

 

gosh, my grammar and syntax went haywire there!

 

=========================

 

I wouldn't worry Peter. An English teacher at a respected Grammar School, when asked to indicate his availability for exam invigilation, wrote:_

 

13th May and 17th of May.......both or either. B)

 

MM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The writer of the programme seems to have his finger on the pulse of current happenings in today's church life, from the `Parish Share' to the `Charismatics'. It is worth seeing the programme twice over as there can be some subtleties missed on the first viewing.

 

Frank Fowler

 

========================

 

I would wish to meet a subtle "charistmatic," because in my experience, they're about as subtle as a bag of flying spanners.

 

MM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am enjoying the programme immensely. They've clearly got someone 'on the inside', judging from some of the topics. I was expecting something of a hatchet job in the mould of most contemporary media attitudes towards churches, but have been very pleasantly surprised. That said, I don't quite know why the archdeacon character keeps talking about 'the Dean'. Don't archdeacons answer directly to the diocesan bishop?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Am enjoying the programme immensely. They've clearly got someone 'on the inside', judging from some of the topics. I was expecting something of a hatchet job in the mould of most contemporary media attitudes towards churches, but have been very pleasantly surprised. That said, I don't quite know why the archdeacon character keeps talking about 'the Dean'. Don't archdeacons answer directly to the diocesan bishop?

 

Yes, I think they do. But in this Diocese (Bristol) responsibility for budgets etc. is being passed over to the Area Deans, and most of this character's comments regarding The Dean are about money.

 

Good programme, though. Enjoying it immensely.

 

Regards to all

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was expecting something of a hatchet job in the mould of most contemporary media attitudes towards churches

I haven't been watching (I watch hardly any TV), but I do remember hearing a preview of the series on Radio 4 (on Kaleidoscope?) and noted some comment to the effect that there was a deliberate aim not to take the mickey out of the church.

 

Actually, while individual comedians have routinely scored cheap laughs at the expense of the church, I think that TV sitcoms on church subjects have generally been quite sympathetic. I don't think anyone could accuse "The Vicar of Dibley" as being anti-church, nor even that now-ancient classic "All Gas and Gaiters". I never followed "Father Ted", but from the one or two episodes I have seen I think the same might be said?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, I think they do. But in this Diocese (Bristol) responsibility for budgets etc. is being passed over to the Area Deans, and most of this character's comments regarding The Dean are about money.

Makes sense - thanks.

 

 

Actually, while individual comedians have routinely scored cheap laughs at the expense of the church, I think that TV sitcoms on church subjects have generally been quite sympathetic. I don't think anyone could accuse "The Vicar of Dibley" as being anti-church, nor even that now-ancient classic "All Gas and Gaiters". I never followed "Father Ted", but from the one or two episodes I have seen I think the same might be said?

As far as I see it, The Vicar of Dibley is relatively sympathetic to the church, while simultaneously managing to portray the congregation as bizarre misfits. Father Ted (which I personally find very funny) is IMHO fairly scathing towards the Irish RC church and its priests, as well as managing to poke fun at isolated Irish folk generally. I might not like the way that Rev. parodies awful hymn playing and singing, but it's hard to argue that such playing and singing isn't common enough, and - unlike Dibley and Father Ted - the entire scene is scarily realistic. "Now, I'm going to drop you off..... here."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As far as I see it, The Vicar of Dibley is relatively sympathetic to the church, while simultaneously managing to portray the congregation as bizarre misfits. Father Ted (which I personally find very funny) is IMHO fairly scathing towards the Irish RC church and its priests, as well as managing to poke fun at isolated Irish folk generally. I might not like the way that Rev. parodies awful hymn playing and singing, but it's hard to argue that such playing and singing isn't common enough, and - unlike Dibley and Father Ted - the entire scene is scarily realistic. "Now, I'm going to drop you off..... here."

 

==============================

 

I cannot imagine anything ever coming close to the quality of writing in "The Vicar of Dibley."

 

This isn't too surprising considering who was involved in much of the writing, and who also acted as co-executive producer; Richard Curtis.

 

Look at the list of his creations and co-creations, and it almost reads like a "what's what" of Brit comedy:-

 

 

FILMS

 

 

The Tall Guy (1989) (Writer)

Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994) (Writer/Co-Executive Producer)

Bean (1997) (Writer/Executive Producer)

Notting Hill (1999) (Writer/Producer)

Bridget Jones's Diary (2001) (Writer)

Love Actually (2003) (Director/Writer)

Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason (2004) (Writer)

Sixty Six (2006) (Executive Producer)

Mr. Bean's Holiday (2007) (Executive Producer)

The Boat That Rocked (2009) (Director/Writer/Producer)

 

TELEVISION

 

Not the Nine O'Clock News (1979–82) (Writer)

Blackadder (Writer)

Spitting Image (1984–85) (Writer)

Bernard and the Genie (1991) (Writer)

Mr. Bean (1990–1995) (Writer)

The Vicar of Dibley (1994–2007) (Writer/Co-Executive Producer)

Robbie the Reindeer (Writer)

The Girl in the Café (2005) (Writer/Executive Producer)

Casualty (2007) (Writer - 1 Episode)

The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency (2008) (Writer/Executive Producer)

Doctor Who (2010) (Writer - 1 Episode: Vincent and the Doctor)

 

 

The top four must be "Mr Bean", "Blackadder," "Four weddings and a funeral" and "The Vicar of Dibley," all of which have circumnavigated the world several times, and which still remain popular and supremely brilliant comedy.

 

If I were to choose rivals to Curtis, it would have to be the late Ronnie Barker and the very much alive Alan Bennett.

 

The thing about the church is that it contains all the ingbredients of good comedy without actually having to do anything.....a fair share of eccentrics, the potential for those "comedy of manners" moments in the classic French style, playing on words, slapstick and all the other techniques of comedy writing. All good comedy and dramatic writing relies on conflict, and the churches certainly have plenty of that.

 

"Father Ted" is an oddball comedy; uniquely Irish and very funny, with most of the jokes deriving from moral failures or the concept of upsetting the power hierarchy of the RC church.

 

Of course, life can be just as funny, and I will never forget the wit of Lord Runcie, when the Pope came to England, and it was announced that Archbishop Runcie would be a co-officiante at a mass; thus upsetting Dr Ian Paisley in Northern Ireland.

 

"I want waaaaards with the Archbishop o'Canterbury!" Roared Paisley.

 

Lord Runcie replied, "I would be delighted to talk to Dr Paisley at any time. All he has to do is to walk across the water to Canterbury!"

 

Genius!

 

MM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...