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andyorgan
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I was prompted to think about this while browsing through the latest Gramophone magazine. How often is it that reviewers of discs really go for the jugular, either of performer, music or in our case, instrument? And it makes it into print. How often do they say things which are completely unintelligible, so that we are not even able to tell if they are good or bad?

 

So, here's the place where you can deposit great one liners from reviews for us all to read and make our minds up about, or merely wish that we had had the nerve/ability with words to write what they did.

 

I'll start with the one that started this, and it's in reference to the music of Einaudi "...his music is as challenging as a Mr Whippy ice cream."

 

Couldn't have put it better.

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The funniest quote I saw was in an Irish publication (I can't remember exactly which one) that described the rather soporific music of Karl Jenkins.

 

The reviewer went on to say that he would more aroused if he were French kissed by an elderly nun than have to listen to that sh**e.

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Well, three are mine own, and three are from the pens of others.

 

1. Herbert Howells: the polite Anglican response to the atheistic, harmonic ramblings of Frederik Delius

 

2. Well, that was a fine piece.

 

3. The acoustic is such that almost anything sounds good, and this evening’s recital was no exception.

 

4. There is little doubt in my mind, but that when the organist was chosen, a better man could not be found.

 

5. I’ve never heard the organ sound like that before.

 

6. A cathedral organist (no names!), once turned to me and said, (after the resident organist had described the re-built organ as magnificent), "Is he bloody tone-deaf?"

 

 

MM

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Adapted from the world of art criticism:-

 

This work has thrown off the constraints of melody, harmony and rhythm.

 

This composer’s native talent has not been crushed by formal musical education.

 

Pushes minimalism far into the realm of non-expressiveness.

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"Ich sitze in dem kleinsten Zimmer in meinem Hause. Ich habe Ihre Kritik vor mir. Im nächsten Augenblick wird sie hinter mir sein." Max Reger to Rudolph Louis, critic for the Münchner Neuste Nachrichten, after reading a bad review published on 7 February, 1906. ("I am sitting in the smallest room of my house. I have your review before me. In a moment it will be behind me!")

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MM will like this one. Ravel, while visiting London, was introduced to a young Herbert Howells, who happened to be proudly clutching the proofs of his Lambert's Clavichord. Howells showed the pieces to Ravel, who scrutinised every page in minute detail. Eventually Ravel handed the proofs back with the remark, "What fine printing!"

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MM will like this one. Ravel, while visiting London, was introduced to a young Herbert Howells, who happened to be proudly clutching the proofs of his Lambert's Clavichord. Howells showed the pieces to Ravel, who scrutinised every page in minute detail. Eventually Ravel handed the proofs back with the remark, "What fine printing!"

Love it!

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MM will like this one. Ravel, while visiting London, was introduced to a young Herbert Howells, who happened to be proudly clutching the proofs of his Lambert's Clavichord. Howells showed the pieces to Ravel, who scrutinised every page in minute detail. Eventually Ravel handed the proofs back with the remark, "What fine printing!"

 

===================

 

That's wonderful!

 

In all fairness, Herbert Howells was the master of modulation, but Ravel was far better at everything else.

 

MM

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