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St George Southall, London


Pierre Lauwers
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Since one day that it appeared in the news section, nobody started

a thread yet, so I will open it; mind you, the link is on the french forum

since yesterday already, where it meets with some interest, well, even attention

(to say the least):

 

http://www.mander-organs.com/portfolio/st-...s-southall.html

 

Continental historians see Abraham Jordan as a kind of myth, someone

completely exotic: this guy built a Swell division in St-Magnus the Martyr,

London, in....1712 !

(In Belgium, we had to wait up to about 1850, just to give a point to compare with...)

 

And now we can hear that Swell Trumpet, box closed, simply by clicking on the link

towards a video on Youtube. And this, in an instrument which interest goes far beyond

that; the tone of the flue stops seems to be delicate and sweet -recorded in the workshop,

so without even an acoustic to help-.

 

This restoration is a great news. Please, go on and restore more so tipically british

baroque (and others!) organs as closest possible to their original state.

Mr Mander (and others) can do it, as we can see and hear. But they need to be asked

to do so, so maybe a part of the move lies in your own hands, the organists.

 

Pierre

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Since one day that it appeared in the news section, nobody started

a thread yet, so I will open it; mind you, the link is on the french forum

since yesterday already, where it meets with some interest, well, even attention

(to say the least):

 

http://www.mander-organs.com/portfolio/st-...s-southall.html

 

Continental historians see Abraham Jordan as a kind of myth, someone

completely exotic: this guy built a Swell division in St-Magnus the Martyr,

London, in....1712 !

(In Belgium, we had to wait up to about 1850, just to give a point to compare with...)

 

And now we can hear that Swell Trumpet, box closed, simply by clicking on the link

towards a video on Youtube. And this, in an instrument which interest goes far beyond

that; the tone of the flue stops seems to be delicate and sweet -recorded in the workshop,

so without even an acoustic to help-.

 

This restoration is a great news. Please, go on and restore more so tipically british

baroque (and others!) organs as closest possible to their original state.

Mr Mander (and others) can do it, as we can see and hear. But they need to be asked

to do so, so maybe a part of the move lies in your own hands, the organists.

 

Pierre

Thanks for this, Pierre. Beautiful. It makes a most interesting comparison to the near-identical (and much less altered, over the years) organ of St Mary de Lode, Gloucester, restored by John Budgen in 2004. (The CD is in the post to you, Pierre!)

 

I look forward to hearing the Jordan/Mander in Southall.

 

Ian

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Really interesting !

At the monent, I'm reading the history of the english organ by the late S. Bicknell, and this illustrates it perfectly.

Thank you Pierre !

I still regret I did not take the time to try the Samuel Green organ in St Paul, Salford...

 

 

=================

 

 

"french Amateur" and myself spent much time talking about the Cavaille-Coll/Lewis/Jardine at the Town Hall a while ago when he was in the UK, but I didn't even know about the Greene instrument at St.Paul's, Salford!

 

How interesting Salford is, with the delightful Renn & Boston at St Philip's, Salford of 1829.

 

Of course, not far away is the other Greater Manchester, Samuel Greene organ at Heaton Hall, Manchester, which I heard many years ago, when we had a trip to there, to the Cathedral, Town Hall and Adlington Hall.

 

There's a lot of very interesting organ-history in and around Manchester.

 

Thanks for the information.

 

MM

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