Jump to content
Mander Organ Builders Forum

New words for old.


DaveHarries

Recommended Posts

As it says, the idea is to think up new meanings for current words. Slightly alter them if you wish.

 

Just for starters, in regards to the 11th post on this link:

http://www.mander-organs.com/discussion/in...=1022&st=60

 

My opening submission is this:

 

Coupla: mug of tea that you drink while playing an organ. :lol:

 

Any more ideas?

 

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

Slightly different, but I once came up with a couple of new stops...

 

One was the Voix Marie Celeste, the pipes of which mysteriously disappear without explanation from the Swell box when the stop is drawn. The other was the Buffoon Hautbois, which was primarily intended for any work by Lefebure-Wely.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Gedact-pommer - flute stop used to store apples

 

Gemshorn - made by Ratners

 

Flute Triangulaire - made by M. C. Escher

 

Flute Traversiere - flute en chamade

 

and, contrariwise

 

Diapoison - an alloy of arsenic, antimony and old lead

Link to post
Share on other sites
Octaf.......an 8ft high Welshman

 

Surely this should be "Oggi-taf"... :angry:

 

"heva", I'm afraid I don't understand your last post. Am I missing an obvious pun?

 

Pull-down: removing someone that shouldn't be at the organ from the bench...

Shutter: loose lid to the console, that threatens to fall on the organist's fingers at any time... geddit?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Surely this should be "Oggi-taf"... :angry:

 

"heva", I'm afraid I don't understand your last post. Am I missing an obvious pun?

 

Maybe, some years ago I worked with a guy from Manchester area who used a certain f-word pronounced quite like vox.

But I'm not a native speaker ...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Scarpa

 

An octave trumpet used to clear the building.

 

Scharf Cymbel

 

The percussionist had better mind his fingers.

 

Schönprincipal

 

A glamorous Head Teacher

 

Sordini

 

A stop of dubious reputation

 

Thirty-Fifth, Flatted

 

The tuner trod on this one

 

Tibia Vulgaris

 

Well, aren't they all!

 

Trigesima Sesta

 

A painful nerve disorder

 

Vox Virgina

 

A stop which has never encountered a Vox Amorosa

 

Haemiol

 

A blood disorder

 

Hellpfeife

 

For playing the devil's music

 

Hautboy

 

A chest of drawers divided into two sections.

 

Heckelphone

 

Device used to interrupt political speakers

 

Gingrina

 

In Spanish-speaking countries, a small female foreigner

 

Fistula Largior

 

Another painful medical condition

 

Dolce Mixture

 

A dessert consisting of fruit and ice cream, with a Cornetto

 

Dwarsfluit

 

An instrument for accompanying the chorus, Heigh-ho, Heigh-ho, As off to work we go.

 

And finally, from the Encyclopedia of Organ Stops, this one which sounds very rude:-

 

Fuchsschwank

 

In describing this unlikely “stop”, whose name comes from the German “fuchs” (fox), “schwanz” (tail), and “schwank” (joke), I could not possibly improve upon Wedgwood, whose entry reads as follows: "One of the strange accessories sometimes found in old German organs. A stop-knob bearing the inscription “Noli me tangere” (“Do not touch”) was attached to the console. As a reward for their curiosity, persons who, regardless of this injunction, touched the knob, thereby set free the catch of a spring, causing a huge foxtail to fly out into their faces. Sometimes the foxtail was simply attached to the stop knob. Having once drawn the tail out of the jamb, it was a matter of some difficulty to replace it. Meanwhile, the recalcitrant culprit was subject to the chaff of his comrades. There is a foxtail near the dwarf “Perkeo”, guarding the great Tun at Heidelberg Castle. St. Andrea, Erfurt; St. Gertrud, Hamburg."

Link to post
Share on other sites

In describing this unlikely “stop”, whose name comes from the German “fuchs” (fox), “schwanz” (tail), and “schwanz” (joke), I could not possibly improve upon Wedgwood, whose entry reads as follows: "One of the strange accessories sometimes found in old German organs. A stop-knob bearing the inscription “Noli me tangere” (“Do not touch”) was attached to the console. As a reward for their curiosity, persons who, regardless of this injunction, touched the knob, thereby set free the catch of a spring, causing a huge foxtail to fly out into their faces. Sometimes the foxtail was simply attached to the stop knob. Having once drawn the tail out of the jamb, it was a matter of some difficulty to replace it. Meanwhile, the recalcitrant culprit was subject to the chaff of his comrades. There is a foxtail near the dwarf “Perkeo”, guarding the great Tun at Heidelberg Castle. St. Andrea, Erfurt; St. Gertrud, Hamburg."

 

 

Apart from the 'Fuchsschwanz', have a look at this... also copied from the Encyclopedia of organ stops.

 

'Vox Inaudita'

 

These names have been used for “dummy” stop controls which do not operate any stop. While Wedgwood characterizes them as “A facetious pleasantry indulged in by some mediaeval organ builders”, Mahrenholz points out that they were often provided for future expansion or for physical symmetry. The names translate as follows:

 

Blinder Zug “blind stop”

Ductus inutilis “useless stop”

Exaudire "to hear plainly"

Manum de tabula "Enough!"

Nihil “nothing”

Pro forma “for appearance”

Reliqua "leftover"

Summer Zug “silent stop”

Swyger “keep silent”

Vacant “missing”

Vacat “missing”

Vox Inaudita “unheard voice”

Vox Ineffabilis “unutterable voice”

 

It would certainly make a change from the row after row of blank stops which you commonly see on North American organs. How fascinating!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...