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Liszt

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I wonder if anyone can help?

 

As it is a Liszt anniversary year I thought I would learn something else by him. I already play the P + F on 'BACH', the Db 'consolation' and a few other trifles. So I have decided to learn the 'Ad nos'. I have the 'Universal' edition but have discovered already a couple of clear misprints. Those that play it; what is the best or most authoritative edition? Having listened to a couple of recordings there are differences in the notes as well as interpretation. Help!

 

F-W

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I have the Editio Musica Budapest edition, which is very good - although I'm not sure how easy it is to find - I think you're quite unlikely to find it in the everyday music shop.

 

There are quite a lot of critical notes and information, including specifications of the organs which Liszt was familiar with. The music is also in quite large print which is very clear - but also means more pageturning!

 

I've also heard that many have a preference for the Peters edition.

 

VA

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I gather the Musica Budapest edition is out of print and I've just been told a few minutes ago (literally) that the Uiniversal Edition is reprinting and may take some time!

 

Malcolm

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Although it has become almost automatic to discount and debunk the Dupre editions, esp. the Franck, I find the Liszt simply wonderful. Whatever its real or imagined shortcomings, it organizes and makes cogent works that can tend to be a bit loose and chaotic. The the fingering and pedal marks are terrific.

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I have the Editio Musica Budapest edition and a question. At bar 188 (plus upbeat) there is a marking for the LH part to move to manual 1 (RH still on II). There are no more manual changes marked until bar 200 (both hands on III). If that is correct,should they not swap at 190 and again at 194 and, if so, what happens after that? Or is it editorial and a matter of taste?

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I have the 'Universal' edition but have discovered already a couple of clear misprints. Those that play it; what is the best or most authoritative edition?

As far as I know, the edition edited by Martin Haselböck (Universal Edition) is the most authorative and "scholastic" (Urtext) edition available.

Could you please give some examples of thse "clear misprints" you mentioned?

Yuu should have a look at IMSLP, there you will find pdf-files of modern Editions as well as the first Editione (4-hand piano version including pedal parts for organ).

 

Having listened to a couple of recordings there are differences in the notes as well as interpretation. Help!

Well, I hope there are many differences! :D

You really should listen to a recording on an historic German romantic instruments (e.g. Ladegast or Walcker), just for the impression, which organ sounds Liszt did know.

A good start are these videos:

 

Regards

Karsten

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Guest Cynic
I wonder if anyone can help?

 

As it is a Liszt anniversary year I thought I would learn something else by him. I already play the P + F on 'BACH', the Db 'consolation' and a few other trifles. So I have decided to learn the 'Ad nos'. I have the 'Universal' edition but have discovered already a couple of clear misprints. Those that play it; what is the best or most authoritative edition? Having listened to a couple of recordings there are differences in the notes as well as interpretation. Help!

 

F-W

 

 

The Peters edition has always seemed good to me. I have other versions including the Margittay, but it is the Peters that gets the most use. Some very sensible places for page-turns too.

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