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Philip

Lemmens - Fanfare

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I bought this piece ages ago and have had a couple of play-throughs but have never given it a public outing. Its well within my grasp - its not that difficult and I'd have thought it should be well-received by the congregation. The bit that puts off is the ending. I have the Novello edition (I think - would have to check in church) which is a reprint and some small notes have been added to the end (the large notes end on a pretty feeble pp) but I've never made much sense of it.

 

Is there a recognised way to give this piece a satisfying ending?

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I bought this piece ages ago and have had a couple of play-throughs but have never given it a public outing. Its well within my grasp - its not that difficult and I'd have thought it should be well-received by the congregation. The bit that puts off is the ending. I have the Novello edition (I think - would have to check in church) which is a reprint and some small notes have been added to the end (the large notes end on a pretty feeble pp) but I've never made much sense of it.

 

Is there a recognised way to give this piece a satisfying ending?

 

 

==================

 

Trust Diane Bishtp put on a show:-

 

 

Then there's the Sheffiel.....sorry....Cavaille-Coll version: all vulgar reeds, high kicks and garters:-

 

 

There's the special "Happy Clappy" version, of course:-

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwOQT3ASuNo...feature=related

 

I tihnk the arpeggios work well personally, but does it matter?

 

It's so loud and bombastic, the place will be empty before you get to the last page.

 

MM

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Hello,

Is there a recognised way to give this piece a satisfying ending?

Möseler published a version edited by Wolfgang Stockmeier. The last 4 bars (bar 108 2nd beat - 111) are marked and forte. This is what Diane Bish plays.

 

Cheers

tiratutti

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Sorry if I've confused the issue - in my edition the big notes stop at the first note of the fourth to last bar (bottom D) and there are some extra notes but they are small notes - probably quite similar to those in the edition you link to.

 

It seems very odd to me to have that bottom D and then just come in with three extra bars which bear little relation to what has gone before. Ah well...

 

Btw, I enjoyed(?!!) the third of MM's links - there is a Widor 5 version uploaded by the same chap too!

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Btw, I enjoyed(?!!) the third of MM's links - there is a Widor 5 version uploaded by the same chap too!

 

====================

 

I'd kill that drummer. He's completely artless; not that drummers usually know much about music.

 

He's about as annoying as those kids who get a tin drum for Christmas. :P

 

MM

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Peter Wright's new CD from Southwark Cathedral features this piece and the ending is quite different from any I've heard before and is, IMHO, very effective and enjoyable. He ends with a unison cadence with almost jazz-like grace notes finishing on bottom D. Simple and fun.

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====================

 

I'd kill that drummer. He's completely artless; not that drummers usually know much about music.

 

He's about as annoying as those kids who get a tin drum for Christmas. :angry:

 

MM

 

 

Completely agree - a GOOD drummer should be able to get a decent Latin American rhythm into Balfour-Gardiner's 'Evening Hymn', at the very least........ :P

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Completely agree - a GOOD drummer should be able to get a decent Latin American rhythm into Balfour-Gardiner's 'Evening Hymn', at the very least........ :P

 

================

 

Oh, I do that sort of thing on the organ when I don't like the hymn tune!

 

The other week the priest announced the St Patrick's Day dance, and I don't think anyone picked out the theme of the following improvisation over the famous chorale, which includes the words:-

 

"You put your left leg in; your left leg out; your left leg in and you shake it all about."

 

Life can be so dull if we don't do something about it.

 

MM

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Peter Wright's new CD from Southwark Cathedral features this piece and the ending is quite different from any I've heard before and is, IMHO, very effective and enjoyable. He ends with a unison cadence with almost jazz-like grace notes finishing on bottom D. Simple and fun.

 

The Fanfare is included in 'The Organists' Manual' by Roger E Davis, and in this instance ends with the grace notes you mention, but it is printed separately as 'the original ending'. At the bottom of the page a note tells us "The ending enclosed in brackets is suggested by the author, the original by Lemmens was for pedals alone . Different endings for this piece may be found in other editions". In other words Davis adds his own ending in small notes (in brackets) at the end of the piece, and the grace note ending by Lemmens as an option!

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I bought this piece ages ago and have had a couple of play-throughs but have never given it a public outing. Its well within my grasp - its not that difficult and I'd have thought it should be well-received by the congregation. The bit that puts off is the ending. I have the Novello edition (I think - would have to check in church) which is a reprint and some small notes have been added to the end (the large notes end on a pretty feeble pp) but I've never made much sense of it.

 

Is there a recognised way to give this piece a satisfying ending?

 

 

Have a look at http://www.mdg.de/titel/0975.htm.

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The Fanfare is included in 'The Organists' Manual' by Roger E Davis, and in this instance ends with the grace notes you mention, but it is printed separately as 'the original ending'. At the bottom of the page a note tells us "The ending enclosed in brackets is suggested by the author, the original by Lemmens was for pedals alone . Different endings for this piece may be found in other editions". In other words Davis adds his own ending in small notes (in brackets) at the end of the piece, and the grace note ending by Lemmens as an option!

 

Thank you for that info. I'd never heard the original ending before buying the Southwark CD. Editors can be strange beasts. It's a bit like someone saying that they don't think the ending of Vierne I is quite right, so they remove the pedal run and substitute "pom-tiddley-om-pom....... pom-pom!. :P

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