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I was quite enjoying reading the interesting comments / observations which stemmed from the initial posting regarding an organ being put up for sale on a certain well known site.

 

As seems to be the usual pattern of events on this site, the subject becomes a little elaborated as contributors give their opinions and can end up appearing to be debating a different topic altogether. Fine, no problem there.

 

The comments raised by contributors seemed ,well, to myself, quite interesting and non-invasive. I realise that not everyone embraces digital technology but it is interesting to have input and cross over at all levels on issues and subjects.

 

A church in my home town has a very fine 4 manual F & A organ which gave up the ghost many years ago and was digitalised by a now well known firm. The pipework remains intact and the original console was converted and has been in use for some thirty years. This console has now collapsed, along with the original electronics but the organ and the 4 manual console has been replaced by a state of the art instrument from the same company and will be inaugurated by a well known and respected organist this June.

 

Why did the Authorities not have the F & A rebuilt? Simply because an astronomic amount of capital had to be pumped into major repairs to the fabric of the church. Something had to give . A good decision was made which suited everyone concerned

 

 

I am somewhat perplexed to find this thread is now closed.

 

I suppose this is what open -ended democratic debate is all about.

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... A church in my home town has a very fine 4 manual F & A organ which gave up the ghost many years ago and was digitalised by a now well known firm. The pipework remains intact and the original console was converted and has been in use for some thirty years. This console has now collapsed, along with the original electronics but the organ and the 4 manual console has been replaced by a state of the art instrument from the same company and will be inaugurated by a well known and respected organist this June.

 

Why did the Authorities not have the F & A rebuilt? Simply because an astronomic amount of capital had to be pumped into major repairs to the fabric of the church. Something had to give . A good decision was made which suited everyone concerned

 

 

I am somewhat perplexed to find this thread is now closed.

 

I suppose this is what open -ended democratic debate is all about.

 

I can see the day arriving, and it will be a very sad day, when a great many more wonderful pipe organs, many of them legacies of times when churches were packed to the doors, will become unplayable because the funds to maintain them are simply not available and there is also no hope of raising them. Pipe organs are likely to become heard only in our cathedrals and major parish churches. As I have posted on a number of occasions, the parish church where I was a chorister has a magnificent 4-manual, 104 speaking stop organ that's not been touched since it was built in 1938. Conservatively, it needs something like £800K to restore, but I cannot see that sort of money being raised, given that it's located in a poor northern city with traditionally high unemployment.

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I can see the day arriving, and it will be a very sad day, when a great many more wonderful pipe organs, many of them legacies of times when churches were packed to the doors, will become unplayable because the funds to maintain them are simply not available and there is also no hope of raising them. Pipe organs are likely to become heard only in our cathedrals and major parish churches. As I have posted on a number of occasions, the parish church where I was a chorister has a magnificent 4-manual, 104 speaking stop organ that's not been touched since it was built in 1938. Conservatively, it needs something like £800K to restore, but I cannot see that sort of money being raised, given that it's located in a poor northern city with traditionally high unemployment.

 

 

I agree totally on this point; therefore, there has to be some form of, dare one utter the word which must not be even breathed, compromise??

 

The organs, of which your example is one of many, provide a testament to the craftsmanship of a bygone age which can still be replicated, but at what a price. When one thinks of those magnificent edifices which were raised by our Victorian forefathers to nourish the spirit and ease the conscience I don`t think that many of them ever realised that their endowments for edifice and magnificent instruments would ever survive as long as they have in order to enable us to pick up the legacy ( and maintenance costs!! ) of keeping their spirit alive. I do not refer specifically to the Great and the Grand examples but rather to the numerous smaller churches throughout the land which recieved endowments from local benefactors.

 

I will not reiterate further on this since I spelt out one of the main reasons for Compromise in my initial posting on the subject. I still expect to be thrown into the tumbril as as an iconoclast for holding such views. I can handle that - no problem B)

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I agree totally on this point; therefore, there has to be some form of, dare one utter the word which must not be even breathed, compromise??

 

The organs, of which your example is one of many, provide a testament to the craftsmanship of a bygone age which can still be replicated, but at what a price. When one thinks of those magnificent edifices which were raised by our Victorian forefathers to nourish the spirit and ease the conscience I don`t think that many of them ever realised that their endowments for edifice and magnificent instruments would ever survive as long as they have in order to enable us to pick up the legacy ( and maintenance costs!! ) of keeping their spirit alive. I do not refer specifically to the Great and the Grand examples but rather to the numerous smaller churches throughout the land which recieved endowments from local benefactors.

 

I will not reiterate further on this since I spelt out one of the main reasons for Compromise in my initial posting on the subject. I still expect to be thrown into the tumbril as as an iconoclast for holding such views. I can handle that - no problem B)

 

I for one won't go for the jugular over compromise. I will go for it, however, when you infer that craftsmanship of a bygone age can only be replicated "at a price". Such craftsmanship can be replicated by finding a contractor for even the most humdrum tuning or cleaning work who is able to demonstrate a love affair with every part of an instrument in his care; that the action has been made the best it can possibly be, and so on. That has nothing to do with price, only ethics. I can think of some extremely bad expensive organs and extremely good cheap organs, probably nearly as many as the more obvious vice versa. Forget price - meet the head of the firm and establish for yourself whether you are dealing with a craftsman, a tradesman, or a contractor.

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I for one won't go for the jugular over compromise. I will go for it, however, when you infer that craftsmanship of a bygone age can only be replicated "at a price". Such craftsmanship can be replicated by finding a contractor for even the most humdrum tuning or cleaning work who is able to demonstrate a love affair with every part of an instrument in his care; that the action has been made the best it can possibly be, and so on. That has nothing to do with price, only ethics. I can think of some extremely bad expensive organs and extremely good cheap organs, probably nearly as many as the more obvious vice versa. Forget price - meet the head of the firm and establish for yourself whether you are dealing with a craftsman, a tradesman, or a contractor.

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Interesting points to ponder on that reply methink. Where large capital sums are available for repair /restoration work then yes, I agree, ethics can prevail over cost. A disposable income always has more purchasing power than a budgeted income - and it tends to lean towards the latter for most of our parish churches and their ilk when it comes to managing and maintaining their fabric and contents.

 

A very large cathedral close to my location is currently doing quite well in raising funds for a major overhaul of its instrument. This is no mean task but if one scales their scheme down in order to compare with a much more modest example then the issues of cost are exactly the same. I mean " Where / how do we raise the capital? "

 

As a result I mention again the unmentionable word " compromise ". I state again that the price is the dominant factor . I know exactly how much time and labour it requires to carry out major repair work on an old tracker instrument. In those Good Old Halcyon Days materials and the labour to go with them were both in plentiful supply, and cheap. Not any more! I do not mean tuning `n tweaking `n hoovering here, more full blown in your face heavy restoration.

 

Which brings me quite nicely on to the point of the availability of those able to carry out such work. Yes, there are numerous firms who carry out excellent work. But let us not forget they are in the business of making a return. They are not charitible institutions who happen to like repairing historic,wonderful instruments. Some firms, and I refuse to name for obvious reasons, have unfortunately denigraded the noble art of the organ builder by carrying out work of a somewhat questionable quality.

 

To finish, one can discuss until the Last Trump soundeth with regard to the descriptive qualities and their relevant worthiness of those proper nouns " craftsman " contractor " " builder " whether that encompasses the sphere of organ building/ repair or any other activity.

 

The terms , must by their very nature, be somewhat arbitary.

 

I finish with an often quoted story from the legendary WTB stable.

 

" Mr. Best, do you happen to know who built the organ in here ? " ( referring to the old Philharmonic Hall in Liverpool )

 

WTB " The joiner. "

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The terms , must by their very nature, be somewhat arbitary.

 

I finish with an often quoted story from the legendary WTB stable.

 

" Mr. Best, do you happen to know who built the organ in here ? " ( referring to the old Philharmonic Hall in Liverpool )

 

WTB " The joiner. "

 

 

==========================

 

 

I find this quite amusing; not simply as a comic statement, but as something being quite close to the truth.

 

I don't know if many board members have ever stumbled across organ built by Laycock & Bannister, but the first John Laycock had been a craftsman joiner before becoming an organ builder. I suppose joiners were better then than they are now, because most things were made of wood, but Laycockj obviously did his homework and his measurements well, because there are quite a few organs of his well over a century old, which continue to give sterling service; so well made were they.

 

Unfortunately, he didn't seem to be a great tonal artist, in spite of some nice (rather than superb) instruments, but structurally and machanically, his instruments were maginificent. Sadly, with the demise of so many smaller parish churches and almost all the big old chapels, many of these instruments were scrapped.

 

MM

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.... A very large cathedral close to my location is currently doing quite well in raising funds for a major overhaul of its instrument. This is no mean task but if one scales their scheme down in order to compare with a much more modest example then the issues of cost are exactly the same. I mean " Where / how do we raise the capital? " ....

 

If we are both thinking of the same instrument (and cathedral), the total capital required includes £95,000 for 're-voicing of the reeds' - I am presently unsure how this could reasonably fall under the guise of either an overhaul or a restoration. I wonder why this was even considered necessary on this particular instrument?

 

One might reasonably expect that a few tongues might need to be replaced, or possibly the odd shallot repaired and pehaps a number of wedges re-seated, etc - but 'revoiced'?

 

Surely some mistake....?

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==========================

 

 

I find this quite amusing; not simply as a comic statement, but as something being quite close to the truth.

 

I don't know if many board members have ever stumbled across organ built by Laycock & Bannister, but the first John Laycock had been a craftsman joiner before becoming an organ builder. I suppose joiners were better then than they are now, because most things were made of wood, but Laycockj obviously did his homework and his measurements well, because there are quite a few organs of his well over a century old, which continue to give sterling service; so well made were they.

 

Unfortunately, he didn't seem to be a great tonal artist, in spite of some nice (rather than superb) instruments, but structurally and machanically, his instruments were maginificent. Sadly, with the demise of so many smaller parish churches and almost all the big old chapels, many of these instruments were scrapped.

 

MM

 

You have reminded me in your post of the name of L & B . There used to be quite a good example of such an instrument in the form of a 3 decker in St. Marys Church, Nelson, Lancs. The church has survived I believe. The organ.................well??

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If we are both thinking of the same instrument (and cathedral), the total capital required includes £95,000 for 're-voicing of the reeds' - I am presently unsure how this could reasonably fall under the guise of either an overhaul or a restoration. I wonder why this was even considered necessary on this particular instrument?

 

One might reasonably expect that a few tongues might need to be replaced, or possibly the odd shallot repaired and pehaps a number of wedges re-seated, etc - but 'revoiced'?

 

Surely some mistake....?

 

 

Yes. I reckon on thatbeing an error too. The work is mainly of a " restoration " in essence. Action/leathering/ electrical etc. So far as I am aware the reeds are functioning in a perfectly satisfactory manner. BUt I am quite sure there are those who would totally disagree.

 

From listening to this particular instrument now even my aged,deaf, tone deaf lugs can detect a significant difference , and improvement in performance/output as a result of the work carried out to date.

 

The same can also be said of the instrument ,also by the same builder which occupies a large building in the same area; work which is being carried out by a local organ builder/repairer/restorer.

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You have reminded me in your post of the name of L & B . There used to be quite a good example of such an instrument in the form of a 3 decker in St. Marys Church, Nelson, Lancs. The church has survived I believe. The organ.................well??

 

=======================

 

In their heyday, Laycock & Bannister turned out a large number of instruments....possibly 700 or more. If St Mary's is the church with the great spire in Nelson, it has been closed for many years, and I have no idea what state the organ is in if it is still there.

 

At one time, I could have counted possbly 40 instruments in a ten mile radius, but perhaps half a dozen remain; largely in Anglican churches: the majority of large, imposing non-conformist chapels having been closed, demolished or turned into housing projects.

 

What astounds me, (changing the thread content completely), is that so many of these magnificently made instruments were wrecked and burned by demolition contractors and developers, yet they could so easily have been used as the basis for tonally revamped instruments, using new pipework.

 

Most instruments built by provinvial builders in modern times, come nowhere close in mechanical quality and structural integrity, even if they sound better.

 

A former employee of the firm used an old L & B Methodist Chapel organ as the basis for a more modern instrument; carrying out the work himself as organist of the church where it is now situated. It's a fine instrument, and is as sound as a rock mechnically; the majority of the instrument's action and windchests dating back to 1870 or so.

 

MM

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==========================

 

 

I find this quite amusing; not simply as a comic statement, but as something being quite close to the truth.

 

I don't know if many board members have ever stumbled across organ built by Laycock & Bannister, but the first John Laycock had been a craftsman joiner before becoming an organ builder. I suppose joiners were better then than they are now, because most things were made of wood, but Laycockj obviously did his homework and his measurements well, because there are quite a few organs of his well over a century old, which continue to give sterling service; so well made were they.

 

Unfortunately, he didn't seem to be a great tonal artist, in spite of some nice (rather than superb) instruments, but structurally and machanically, his instruments were maginificent. Sadly, with the demise of so many smaller parish churches and almost all the big old chapels, many of these instruments were scrapped.

 

MM

 

I can't say I can recall coming across an organ that L&B had built from scratch. But I do recall their involvement with the organ at Bridlington Priory in the late 1960's, some 20 years after John Compton had done major work on the instrument. I have a hunch that the Priory's then organist, Raymond Sunderland, probably had a strong hand to play in the appointment of L&B as I think he came originally from the Keighley area. Of course it was Nicholsons who later acquired the L&B business and who have looked after the organ ever since.

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=======================

 

In their heyday, Laycock & Bannister turned out a large number of instruments....possibly 700 or more. If St Mary's is the church with the great spire in Nelson, it has been closed for many years, and I have no idea what state the organ is in if it is still there.

 

At one time, I could have counted possbly 40 instruments in a ten mile radius, but perhaps half a dozen remain; largely in Anglican churches: the majority of large, imposing non-conformist chapels having been closed, demolished or turned into housing projects.

 

What astounds me, (changing the thread content completely), is that so many of these magnificently made instruments were wrecked and burned by demolition contractors and developers, yet they could so easily have been used as the basis for tonally revamped instruments, using new pipework.

 

Most instruments built by provinvial builders in modern times, come nowhere close in mechanical quality and structural integrity, even if they sound better.

 

A former employee of the firm used an old L & B Methodist Chapel organ as the basis for a more modern instrument; carrying out the work himself as organist of the church where it is now situated. It's a fine instrument, and is as sound as a rock mechnically; the majority of the instrument's action and windchests dating back to 1870 or so.

 

MM

 

 

Such is the wicked way of life - no respect for the old or the dead!!

 

Such destruction of the craftsmans work has gone on since time immemorial. The earliest example of such destruction I can recall was as a youngster I can remember a local church coming under the hammer and since it was the `6o`s the students from the local art college used the pipes; painted various colours as an " installation " to use a current artistic phrase!

 

One of the worst examples which comes to mind is that of a very large Pugin church somewhere in the West Riding which had an excellent F & A instrument incorporating some Schultze and Cavaille- Coll pipework.

 

The church was broken into one night and thieves stripped out the metal pipes. Those responsible were caught, the pipework was given back to the church and the incumbent at the time promptly sold it on for scrap!!!

 

This fine church remains and comes under the auspices of the Redundant Churchs Protection League ,or something of a similar description.

 

In fact some of the instrument remains - but what a mess!

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I can't say I can recall coming across an organ that L&B had built from scratch. But I do recall their involvement with the organ at Bridlington Priory in the late 1960's, some 20 years after John Compton had done major work on the instrument. I have a hunch that the Priory's then organist, Raymond Sunderland, probably had a strong hand to play in the appointment of L&B as I think he came originally from the Keighley area. Of course it was Nicholsons who later acquired the L&B business and who have looked after the organ ever since.

 

======================

 

The Laycock & Bannister connection at Bridlington dates from long before Dennis Thurlow had any involvement. The time line is interesting, in that a certain Jessie Caulthurst funded the re-build at Bridlington, possibly because she had also funded outright the new organ by Laycock & Bannister at Ermysteds School, Skipton. (Quite a fine extension style instrument in the school hall) A local philanthropist with quite a wad of spare cash,Jessie Coulthurst, (of Gargrave Hall, nr Skipton), funded all sorts of music societies, choirs and organs. I believe that the Coulthurst Trust still exists to-day.

 

Quite clearly, Jessie Coulthurst favoiured local music and local industry, and she probably wasnt aware of the fact that Laycock & Bannister had no real tonal pedigree, but built organs to last.

 

I believe it was the new organ at Ermysteds Grammar School which marked the point at which a certain gentleman by the name of John (?) Brown started to influence the then proprietor of L & B, Frank Bannister. (Brown may have been music-master at the school). Now with all respect to Frank, who was a good craftsman, he was as thick as a plank on tonal matters, as were virtually all his staff.....this much being glaringly obvious to any type of critical ear. Brown was extremely gifted as a tonal man, but whatever the style of "partnership" he enjoyed with L & B, (I could not put a name to it), he was extremely able as a designer/consultant and tonal advisor. Brown also had a certain gentlemanly quality, which one could never accuse Frank Bannister of having: he being the archetypical gruff Yorkshireman.

 

Brown found favour with Jessie Coulthurst, and after the success at Skipton Grammar School (Ermysteds), as well as other smaller jobs and re-builds, she was quite happy to put her money into backing L & B undertakings. I suspect, (but do not know for sure), that Raymond Sunderland possibly hadn't much option but to accept the involvement of L & B if Mrs Coulthurst was putting up the cash.

 

It was at this time that I did a bit of the benchwork for the Bridlington job, and trudged over there in a large Humber Imperial driven by the late Cedric Laycock, (the Grandson of the company's founder, but without ongoing financial interests), at 30mph for the most part; often in thick fog. It was like setting out for an Arctic adventure, and required about as much stamina.

 

The Dennis Thurlow involvement came later, after he (and Nicholson's) had taken control of L & B; when the very finest work of the company was done. Fortunately or unfortunately, (as the case may have been), the heating system at the priory went berserk, and the organ was polluted by paraffin oil drawn into the blower inlet. Dennis Thurlow waved his hands over the rather premature but necessary re-build, (this time covered by insurance money, I believe), and in the process, he did a lot of re-voicing and regulating. (He told me that the original new pipework had just been thrown in and left by L & B, which might explain the total mismatch with the Annessens/Compton pipework). A far better organ resulted, but the original concept was flawed, with its rather screechy additions to a rather sombre, singing ensemble of some gravity. I seem to recall that the new pipes were supplied by Rogers of Bramley.

 

It's rather sad in some ways, that a company which made so many organs never made many which sounded good....all that effort for very little, it would seem. The notable exception was Heaton Baptist Church, with its' Cavaille-Coll reeds, which came close to being the company's best work. Under the influence of John (?) Brown, the tonal quality reached a new high certainly, (Skipton PC) with some excellent re-builds and a few new instruments. However, it was the organ I play, at St Joseph's (RC), Keighley, which remains the crowning glory of the firm, not long before the company ceased to exist. This has the unmistakable foot-print of Dennis Thurlow's tonal genius, and with the perfect acoustic, he was blessed with the perfect opportunity to create something very special.....which he did admirably.

 

MM

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Such is the wicked way of life - no respect for the old or the dead!!

 

Such destruction of the craftsmans work has gone on since time immemorial. The earliest example of such destruction I can recall was as a youngster I can remember a local church coming under the hammer and since it was the `6o`s the students from the local art college used the pipes; painted various colours as an " installation " to use a current artistic phrase!

 

One of the worst examples which comes to mind is that of a very large Pugin church somewhere in the West Riding which had an excellent F & A instrument incorporating some Schultze and Cavaille- Coll pipework.

 

The church was broken into one night and thieves stripped out the metal pipes. Those responsible were caught, the pipework was given back to the church and the incumbent at the time promptly sold it on for scrap!!!

This fine church remains and comes under the auspices of the Redundant Churchs Protection League ,or something of a similar description.

 

In fact some of the instrument remains - but what a mess!

 

=================

 

 

Reading between the lines, (and the gaps on the pipe-racks), I think you may be referring to All Soul's, Hayley Hill, Halifax.....the famous "Schulze" organ (with a few real Schulze ranks), built by Forster & Andrews and voiced by Philip Selfe, if my memory serves me correctly. (It never sounded like a Schulze organ, but it did sound superb). I heard Flor Peeters in recital on this very organ.

 

The church is not by Pugin, but in fact by Giles Gilbert-Scott, and although made of very soft limestone, it is the most wonderful landmark in Halifax, if only because the ancient Parish Church is built in a valley bottom and almost invisible to anyone in the centre of town.

 

MM

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MusingMuso wrote

 

[..snip..] The church is not by Pugin, but in fact by Giles Gilbert-Scott, [..snip..]

 

MM

 

 

The church was consecrated in 1859 and Giles Gilbert Scott was not born until 1880. The architect was his grandfather Sir George Gilbert Scott who thought of it as "on the whole, my best church."

 

Oscar

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=================

 

 

Reading between the lines, (and the gaps on the pipe-racks), I think you may be referring to All Soul's, Hayley Hill, Halifax.....the famous "Schulze" organ (with a few real Schulze ranks), built by Forster & Andrews and voiced by Philip Selfe, if my memory serves me correctly. (It never sounded like a Schulze organ, but it did sound superb). I heard Flor Peeters in recital on this very organ.

 

The church is not by Pugin, but in fact by Giles Gilbert-Scott, and although made of very soft limestone, it is the most wonderful landmark in Halifax, if only because the ancient Parish Church is built in a valley bottom and almost invisible to anyone in the centre of town.

 

MM

 

 

You are totally correct. Thank you for that correction as well. Advancing years and the comensurate madness which accompanies it!!

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MusingMuso wrote

 

[..snip..] The church is not by Pugin, but in fact by Giles Gilbert-Scott, [..snip..]

 

MM

 

 

The church was consecrated in 1859 and Giles Gilbert Scott was not born until 1880. The architect was his grandfather Sir George Gilbert Scott who thought of it as "on the whole, my best church."

 

Oscar

 

Correct, and as has my serious error been pointed out by another esteemed poster, thank you for that!

 

It is a magnificent piece of architecture and I think we should still be thankful for Edward Akroyd in being such a generous benefactor ( alongside his other philanthropic work in Halifax as well )

 

The edifice still behoves a still impressive town ( or is Halifax a city now?? )

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Correct, and as has my serious error been pointed out by another esteemed poster, thank you for that!

 

It is a magnificent piece of architecture and I think we should still be thankful for Edward Akroyd in being such a generous benefactor ( alongside his other philanthropic work in Halifax as well )

 

The edifice still behoves a still impressive town ( or is Halifax a city now?? )

 

I would dearly have loved to have seen his (Scott's) church in Hamburg (destroyed by the allies) which was the tallest (147.3m) in the world for 2 years after the spire was completed in 1874. The Spire (like Coventry) still remains and is the city's second tallest building. We forget that British architects were/are highly regarded aboard. I was also amazed at the Scottish work in and around St Petersburg when I first went there.

Best wishes,

N

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I would dearly have loved to have seen his (Scott's) church in Hamburg (destroyed by the allies) which was the tallest (147.3m) in the world for 2 years after the spire was completed in 1874. The Spire (like Coventry) still remains and is the city's second tallest building. We forget that British architects were/are highly regarded aboard. I was also amazed at the Scottish work in and around St Petersburg when I first went there.

Best wishes,

N

 

I think a few of the people who are contributing to this thread would possibly enjoy the opportunity to peruse some of these edifices if you have any pics available.

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I think a few of the people who are contributing to this thread would possibly enjoy the opportunity to peruse some of these edifices if you have any pics available.

 

Try this as a link to a drawing. There are a number of photos of the spire if you Google "Images". Have a hunt.

Best wishes,

N

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=================

 

 

Reading between the lines, (and the gaps on the pipe-racks), I think you may be referring to All Soul's, Hayley Hill, Halifax.....the famous "Schulze" organ (with a few real Schulze ranks), built by Forster & Andrews and voiced by Philip Selfe, if my memory serves me correctly. (It never sounded like a Schulze organ, but it did sound superb). I heard Flor Peeters in recital on this very organ.

 

The church is not by Pugin, but in fact by Giles Gilbert-Scott, and although made of very soft limestone, it is the most wonderful landmark in Halifax, if only because the ancient Parish Church is built in a valley bottom and almost invisible to anyone in the centre of town.

 

MM

 

Phillip Marshall was once the organist here, not sure when, sometime pre Lincoln/Ripon/Boston PC.

Here are a few photos which just show a bit of ruinous organ material. All Soul's is a Grade 1 listed building and has recently had quite a bit of HLF money spent on it, the Churches Conservation Trust undertook the work.

 

DT

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Try this as a link to a drawing. There are a number of photos of the spire if you Google "Images". Have a hunt.

Best wishes,

N

 

 

======================

 

 

That would have been perfect for Harry Potter, wouldn't it?

 

Dirty rotters for bombing it! (Oh dear! That's Billy Bunter isn't it?)

 

MM

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Phillip Marshall was once the organist here, not sure when, sometime pre Lincoln/Ripon/Boston PC.

Here are a few photos which just show a bit of ruinous organ material. All Soul's is a Grade 1 listed building and has recently had quite a bit of HLF money spent on it, the Churches Conservation Trust undertook the work.

 

DT

 

=================

 

 

I didn't know that Philip Marshall was organist at All Souls, Halifax, but I did know that I sort of followed him at Holy Trinity, Keighley, when he was music master at the local Boy's Grammar School.

 

I only met him the once, at Lincoln, in the company of one of his former fellow teachers at the school, and it was an entirely delightful experience. He was charming and witty in equal measure, and of course, a superb choir-trainer/organist.

 

MM

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MusingMuso wrote

 

[..snip..] The church is not by Pugin, but in fact by Giles Gilbert-Scott, [..snip..]

 

MM

 

 

The church was consecrated in 1859 and Giles Gilbert Scott was not born until 1880. The architect was his grandfather Sir George Gilbert Scott who thought of it as "on the whole, my best church."

 

Oscar

 

==============

 

 

Quite right Oscar!

 

Thanks for correcting my mistake.

 

MM

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