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I was wondering if anyone knew anything about organs in NT properties - do they have an 'attached' organ expert etc. or has anyone compiled a list/catalogued etc.?

 

A

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I was wondering if anyone knew anything about organs in NT properties - do they have an 'attached' organ expert etc. or has anyone compiled a list/catalogued etc.?

 

A

 

Hmm, what an interesting question.

 

No idea if they've ever been catelogued, but several properties spring immediately to mind, all of which have organs of great interest whether or not they actually still work. Ones that I've played or heard played so know they work (at least within the last ten years or so!) are asterixed.

 

Calke Abbey - 1 manual 1825 Flight and Robson

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=N00414

 

Kedleston hall - 2 manual Snetzler 1765, restored by Dominic Gwynn

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=D02535

 

All Saints Kedleston - 2 manual Hill, 1899 (unplayable) in divided case

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=D02318

 

Tatton Hall 3 manual Willis III, 1935 [*]

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=N02354

 

St Michael's Mount - 3 manual, 14 stop, originally Byfield 1786 [*]

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=D05198

 

Attingham Hall - 1 manual Samuel Green, 1788 [*]

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=N01747

 

Erddig Park - 2 manual 1865 Bevinton

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=D03324

 

Oxburgh Hall 1760 1 manual Elliot or Snetzler 1760

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=N06566

 

Osterley Park 1788 1 manual Henry Holland, 2001 Goetze and Gwynn

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=R00800

 

If you are looking for a good place for a day out, don't forget English Heritage too, or houses in private ownership. Examples:

 

Eccleston Hall Gray and Davison barrel organ 1838

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=D06471

 

Blenheim Palace 4 manual Father Willis, 1891 [*]

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=N09565

 

Blenheim Palace chapel (next room to the library!) 2 manual Postill, 1853 [*]

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=N09566

 

Adlington Hall Father Smith 1670 [*]

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=N04410

 

Heaton Park (owned by Manchester City Council, 2 manual Green 1790 [*]

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=N01584

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To which I can add a few more:

 

Canons Ashby, Northamptonshire (Father Smith/ Goetze & Gwynn)

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi?Fn=Rsearch&rec_index=N13232 ://http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsea...c_index=N13232 ://http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsea...c_index=N13232

Also an organ in St Mary's church, Canon's Ashby, but seemingly not listed on NPOR.

 

Killerton House, Devon - William Gray, 1807

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=N12976

 

Killerton House Chapel- Positive Organ Co.

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=N12975

 

Hanbury Hall- Samuel Green- Claviorganum- mentioned in this thread

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=T01068

 

I'm sure there's an organ in Cothele House Chapel, but nothing listed on NPOR- I've certainly played it, but not 100% sure it was Cothele!

 

Calke Abbey, Derbyshire- Unknown/Goetze & Gwynn

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...01#PhotoSection

 

Calke Abbey- Barrel Organ, 1793

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=K00941

 

Baddesley Clinton Church, adjoining house- Chamber organ by Sarah Green (Samuel Green's widow)

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=N05825 Not technically NT property but of interest if visiting the NT house...

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I visited this house earlier in the year and the steward was very keen for me to play it when she saw me take an interest - don't be afraid to ask if you visit as they seem to like it being used!

 

Steve

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Sledemre House in East Yorkshire, not NT or EH but, is owned by the Sykes family. There is a large three manual organ in the Hall which used to be played by the late Sir Richard Sykes on a Sunday afternoon.

 

I drove past some time ago and there was a sign outside the hall saying that 'the organ is now being played'. There are numerous references to the instrument on the 'net' - it seems it is played nowadays on Wednesdays and Sundays.

 

There also appears to be a recording made by Simon Lindley available 'only at the house' and I thought, although I may be mistaken, that Francis Jackson recorded some Stanford from there.

 

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=D05066

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Some years ago I sent in a series of corrections to the NPOR to try and get them to include "National Trust" in the address so that it could be used as a search term. "National Trust" in the address search box is currently showing 14 properties. (Interesting to see the cut and paste below pastes more than was displayed on the NPOR screen.) I'm sure that they will be delighted to know of more.

PJW

 

Denbighshire (Clwyd) Erddig Park (SJ3248) , Erddig Park , former seat of the Yorke family (National Trust Country House)

 

Chapel Organ

Surveyed: See details of K00710

Builders:

Entrance Hall Organ

Surveyed: 1977 IIP 9 See details of D03324 Organ in bad state of repair

Builders: 1865 Bevington

 

Derbyshire Kedleston (SK312403) , Kedleston Hall , DE22 5JH (National Trust Property)

 

Surveyed: 1995 I 7 See details of D02535 Organ playable

Builders: 1765 John Snetzler

1824 Alexander Buckingham

1993 Dominic Gwynn

 

Derbyshire Ticknall (SK369223) , St. Giles , Calke Abbey (National Trust), LE65 1RR (Private Church in Calke Abbey Park)

 

Barrel Organ

Surveyed: 2001 3 See details of N00414

Builders: 1825? Flight & Robson ?

1865(c.)

 

Devon Castle Drogo (SX721900) , Chapel , EX6 6PB (National Trust Property)

 

Surveyed: 2002 I 9 See details of A00579 Organ unusable

Builders: Positive Organ Co

 

Devon Killerton House (SS9700) , Killerton House (National Trust House)

 

Surveyed: 2002 IIP 11 See details of N12976

Builders: 1807 William Gray

1901 Henry Dyer & Son

 

Gloucestershire Snowshill (SP09663389) , Snowshill Manor , WR12 7JU (National Trust Manor House)

 

Surveyed: 1975 I 3 See details of N05778

Builders: 1810(c.) Christopher Gerock

 

 

Hampshire Sherborne St. John (SU636568) , The Vyne , RG24 9HL (National Trust Property)

 

History of 1949 Henry Holland organ from The Vyne, Basingstoke

Surveyed: 1968 I 6 See details of N11325 Organ transferred elsewhere

Builders: 1949

1955 N.P. Mander

1960 N.P. Mander

 

Herefordshire (Hereford and Worcester) Croft (SO4565) , Croft Castle (National Trust Property)

 

Surveyed: 2004 I 10 See details of J00031 Organ maintained

Builders: 2003 M.J. Doust

 

Kent Sevenoaks -- Knole (TQ539542) , Knole House Chapel , Knole Lane, Knole, TN15 0RP (National Trust Property Chapel)

 

Surveyed: 1968 I 5 See details of N14808

Builders: 1623?

 

Middlesex (London, Greater) Osterley Park (TQ145780) , Osterley Park House , Jersey Road, TW7 4RB (National Trust House)

 

History of 1949 Henry Holland organ from The Vyne, Basingstoke

Surveyed: 2003 I 6 See details of R00800 Organ playable

Builders: 1788 Henry Holland

2001 Goetze and Gwynn

 

Somerset (Avon) Tyntesfield (ST 506 715) , Tyntesfield Estate Chapel (National Trust Property)

 

Surveyed: 2002 IIP 10 See details of K00078 Organ no longer present

Builders: 1873 Wm Hill

 

Somerset (Avon) Tyntesfield (ST 506 715) , Tyntesfield Oratory (National Trust Property)

 

Surveyed: See details of R00931 Organ no longer present

Builders: Brindley

 

Surrey Clandon, East (TQ 067 520) , Hatchlands , former residence of Lord Rendel, GU4 7RT (National Trust Property)

 

Surveyed: 2004 IIIP 19 See details of N13737 Organ maintained

Builders: 1904 J.W. Walker & Sons

Surveyed: 2004 I 9 See details of K00344 Organ playable

Builders: 1989

1996 Goetze & Gwynn

 

Warwickshire Coughton (SP083606 ) , St. Peter, Paul & Elizabeth , Coughton Court, (National Trust Property), B49 5JA (Roman Catholic Chapel)

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I was wondering if anyone knew anything about organs in NT properties - do they have an 'attached' organ expert etc. or has anyone compiled a list/catalogued etc.?

 

A

 

A large 3m Gray and Davison, in the miniature cathedral chapel of Clumber Park , a NT property in Notts.

 

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=A00709

 

When the Chapel was built the Duke of Newcastle established a Choir School and hired domestic and ground staff who could sing in the back rows.

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A large 3m Gray and Davison, in the miniature cathedral chapel of Clumber Park , a NT property in Notts.

 

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=A00709

 

When the Chapel was built the Duke of Newcastle established a Choir School and hired domestic and ground staff who could sing in the back rows.

 

It's a beautifully-sounding instrument that was last worked on, I believe, by H&H. My late friend, Peter Goodman, the former city organist at Hull, played it quite regularly on Wednesday afternoons when he lived at nearby Worksop.

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Sledemre House in East Yorkshire, not NT or EH but, is owned by the Sykes family. There is a large three manual organ in the Hall which used to be played by the late Sir Richard Sykes on a Sunday afternoon.

 

I drove past some time ago and there was a sign outside the hall saying that 'the organ is now being played'. There are numerous references to the instrument on the 'net' - it seems it is played nowadays on Wednesdays and Sundays.

 

There also appears to be a recording made by Simon Lindley available 'only at the house' and I thought, although I may be mistaken, that Francis Jackson recorded some Stanford from there.

 

http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=D05066

 

The Sledmere House organ used to be played to the public most Sunday afternoons when the house was open during the season. The person who played it, perhaps still does, was the organist at Rudston parsh church not far from Bridlington.

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It's a beautifully-sounding instrument that was last worked on, I believe, by H&H. My late friend, Peter Goodman, the former city organist at Hull, played it quite regularly on Wednesday afternoons when he lived at nearby Worksop.

 

I believe too that this comes under the auspices of Worksop Priory where Michael Overbury is in charge of music.

 

A

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Eaton Hall, Chester, home of the Duke of Westminster, has a 3-man Whiteley in an excellent acoustic. receently restored by Nicholson. Often played on the garden Open Days when the chapel is open, the Hall is their residence and is closely guarded but the gardens are well worth a visit - even a narrow gauge railway, a replica of an earlier system serving the hall. Chester Cathedral choir usually have a concert there once a year to raise funds for tours etc..

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The Sledmere House organ used to be played to the public most Sunday afternoons when the house was open during the season. The person who played it, perhaps still does, was the organist at Rudston parsh church not far from Bridlington.

 

My wife was a member of Sykes family. Prior to his death in 1978 the organ was played on a Sunday by Sir Richard Sykes, the 7th Baronet.

 

I know the great organ in the little village church at Rudston, an old vicar was a close friend of mine. It may be that the Sledmere organ is still played by the person you mention. I am up that way soon and will try to be there on a Wednesday or Sunday and call in.

 

Rudston Parish church - the rebuilt present organ: http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=P00645

 

The original organ given to Rudston village church by Sir Alexander McDonald of the Isles: http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=N08144

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The Sledmere House organ used to be played to the public most Sunday afternoons when the house was open during the season. The person who played it, perhaps still does, was the organist at Rudston parsh church not far from Bridlington.

 

============================

 

 

Going back maybe 30 years or so, "His Grace" allowed me to play the organ at Sledmere, and then asked me to advize on what should be done with the old Binns, Fitton & Haley as it then was. I'm pleased to say that almost everything I suggested was incorporated into the re-built instrument, which was undertaken by Jeffrey Coffin. The original plan, to my horror, was to replace it with a new neo-baroque organ! (I think J W Walker had suggested this).

 

An organ or two which haven't been mentioned are those at the Hall i' th' wood museum, Bolton, (Council owned and run), and the Christian Schmidt (?) organ in the church of the Staunton Harold estate, which once served as a private chapel. I'm not sure who owns the estate these days, but the church is NT property, and of exquisite beauty inside and out. Thurston Dart made a recording of the organ in an LP of "old English organ music," of which I have a copy. (Shared with several other instruments). I have played the instrument very briefly on a visit there, but how authentic it now is, I have no idea.

 

The Hall i' th' wood museum is fascinating; not least because it is the birthplace of the mechanised cotton industry of Lancashire, where Samuel Crompton invented the "Spinning Mule."

 

Of even greater interest to us, is the fact that he also built an organ!

 

This instrument was NOT in the "Sweden-Georgian" church in Bolton as stated in the NPOR, but in the "Swedenborgean" church; an interesting Christian sect which thrived throughout the 19th century in a small but significant way; embracing religion, science and industry.

 

When the "Swedenborg" church closed in Bolton, the organ was rescued and place in the Hall i' th' Wood museum, where it remains to-day, as a fitting tribute to the varied skills of Samuel Crompton.

 

MM

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============================

Going back maybe 30 years or so, "His Grace" allowed me to play the organ at Sledmere,

 

MM

 

 

Oh dear - that's rather amusing. I'm sure whichever member of the family it was thoroughly enjoyed being addressed as 'Your Grace' - which is reserved only for Archbishops and Dukes or Duchesses. Baronets are addressed as 'Sir' or by their name!

 

You probably gave advice to the 8th Baronet, Sir Tatton Sykes, although I do know that the subject of re-build was on Richard Sykes' mind prior to his death - he had initiated the 1947 re-build.

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Oh dear - that's rather amusing. I'm sure whichever member of the family it was thoroughly enjoyed being addressed as 'Your Grace' - which is reserved only for Archbishops and Dukes or Duchesses. Baronets are addressed as 'Sir' or by their name!

 

You probably gave advice to the 8th Baronet, Sir Tatton Sykes, although I do know that the subject of re-build was on Richard Sykes' mind prior to his death - he had initiated the 1947 re-build.

 

 

=====================

 

You're right of course!

 

I don't often meet people like this.

 

However, you are also right that it was indeed Sir Tatton Sykes with whom I corresponded, and I think I hit the nail on the head by suggesting that a re-build of the instrument would have been a fitting memorial to his father. I'm glad that this is what happened, because the idea of a neo-baroque organ in a stately home seemed completely wrong to me.

 

It all seems such a long time ago now.

 

MM

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However, you are also right that it was indeed Sir Tatton Sykes with whom I corresponded, and I think I hit the nail on the head by suggesting that a re-build of the instrument would have been a fitting memorial to his father. I'm glad that this is what happened, because the idea of a neo-baroque organ in a stately home seemed completely wrong to me.

An organ of a style contemporary with that of the building it's in? That would be awful. It'd be like Queen’s Oxford all over again.

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An organ of a style contemporary with that of the building it's in? That would be awful. It'd be like Queen's Oxford all over again.

 

============================

 

 

Except that it wouldn't have been. It would have been a late 20th century neo-baroque instrument with a pan-European specification.

 

It would not have been in the old English style at all.

 

Musically, I completely accept the stunning quality of the Queens' College, Frobenius, but then I would, wouldn't I?

 

After all, I do play one of the best neo-baroque organs from that era, which like Queens' is always referred to as "a bit special."

 

Were an organ of a classical disposition to be installed at Sledmere, I suspect it would have to follow the tonal character of Snetzler, Harris, Greene or Byfield; refinement being a pre-requisite, in what is not a VERY large room, unlike somewhere like Blenheim Palace.

 

MM

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My wife was a member of Sykes family. Prior to his death in 1978 the organ was played on a Sunday by Sir Richard Sykes, the 7th Baronet.

 

I know the great organ in the little village church at Rudston, an old vicar was a close friend of mine. It may be that the Sledmere organ is still played by the person you mention. I am up that way soon and will try to be there on a Wednesday or Sunday and call in.

 

Rudston Parish church - the rebuilt present organ: http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=P00645

 

The original organ given to Rudston village church by Sir Alexander McDonald of the Isles: http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=N08144

 

 

==================================

 

 

How interesting to learn about Sir Alexander MacDonald donating the organ. I have often wondered about the details of a visit to Skye, when I met a lady organist called, I think, Flora MacDonald.

 

I was only about 13 or so, and I hope I've got the name right, but she was apparently quite a blue-blood.

 

Family connection perhaps?

 

MM

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==================================

 

 

How interesting to learn about Sir Alexander MacDonald donating the organ. I have often wondered about the details of a visit to Skye, when I met a lady organist called, I think, Flora MacDonald.

 

I was only about 13 or so, and I hope I've got the name right, but she was apparently quite a blue-blood.

 

Family connection perhaps?

 

MM

 

I suspect it's the wrong branch of the same clan!

 

Sir Alexander McDonald who gave the huge 4 manual organ to Rudston Parish Church, where he was organist for over 40 years, was a member of the McDonald's of Sleat whose home, since about 1847, has been in Yorkshire - at Thorpe Hall, Rudston.

 

I knew the organ in the very early 1970's when it was a large two-manual. Since then I notice that a choir organ has been added 'in the style of the orginal' as well as swell and pedal reeds. The church is tiny, full organ must be deafening, and the organ case completely covers the West wall of the church. On entering the building you are immediately confronted by this large organ case which, I understand, suffered bomb damage during the 2nd world war. The console is in the chancel and, in truth, the instrument is 'nothing special' save that it must be one of the largest village organs in the land! (dangerous statement!)

 

It might be 'nothing special' but it's well worth a visit for members of the board who might be on their way to organ recitals at Bridlington Priory. Going along the A614 Driffield to Bridlington road turn left at Burton Agnes, just before the hall. Rudston village is three miles down this road. The benefice of Rudston, Carnaby, Boynton and Kilham has the incumbent living at Rudston - the vicarage is opposite the church. In previous times I was always made to feel very welcome when calling in.

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I suspect it's the wrong branch of the same clan!

 

Sir Alexander McDonald who gave the huge 4 manual organ to Rudston Parish Church, where he was organist for over 40 years, was a member of the McDonald's of Sleat whose home, since about 1847, has been in Yorkshire - at Thorpe Hall, Rudston.

 

I knew the organ in the very early 1970's when it was a large two-manual. Since then I notice that a choir organ has been added 'in the style of the orginal' as well as swell and pedal reeds. The church is tiny, full organ must be deafening, and the organ case completely covers the West wall of the church. On entering the building you are immediately confronted by this large organ case which, I understand, suffered bomb damage during the 2nd world war. The console is in the chancel and, in truth, the instrument is 'nothing special' save that it must be one of the largest village organs in the land! (dangerous statement!)

 

It might be 'nothing special' but it's well worth a visit for members of the board who might be on their way to organ recitals at Bridlington Priory. Going along the A614 Driffield to Bridlington road turn left at Burton Agnes, just before the hall. Rudston village is three miles down this road. The benefice of Rudston, Carnaby, Boynton and Kilham has the incumbent living at Rudston - the vicarage is opposite the church. In previous times I was always made to feel very welcome when calling in.

 

=======================================

 

 

Oh dear! I put you to a lot of trouble, and on checking, now realise that I had got the Scots name wrong. I am half MacDonald apprently, though I always refused to wear the skirt!

 

I think the person to whom I was referring, may well have been the utterly formidable, late Dame Flora Macleod of the Macleods, who slummed it by living in Dunvegan Castle, on the Isle of Skye. I believe she was the last person to be born in 10, Downing Street.

 

I wish I knew the exact details of her musical ability, for it would confirm one wqy or the other whether or not it was she I met, but I believe it may well have been.

 

At the age of 13 or so, you don't take titles too seriously.

 

MM

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