Jump to content
Mander Organs

Desert Island Discs


MusingMuso

Recommended Posts

The BBC have been rambling on about the Desert Island Discs archives all week, and the thought occurred to me that organists rarely get a say. (I think Noel Rawsthorne once did a prgramme with the late Roy Plumley).

 

Anyway, I wonder if our personal selection of music would throw up any surprises; not forgetting the two luxury items of course, which cannot be the Bible or anythnig by Shakespeare.

 

I'll leave my selection 'til later......you wouldn't believe it.

 

MM

Link to post
Share on other sites
The BBC have been rambling on about the Desert Island Discs archives all week, and the thought occurred to me that organists rarely get a say. (I think Noel Rawsthorne once did a prgramme with the late Roy Plumley).

 

Anyway, I wonder if our personal selection of music would throw up any surprises; not forgetting the two luxury items of course, which cannot be the Bible or anythnig by Shakespeare.

 

I'll leave my selection 'til later......you wouldn't believe it.

 

MM

I attend a bi-monthly group at which people share their choice of recording, and on each occasion I find it difficult to make a choice from my collection of more than 1,000 CDs. Choosing eight to last me a lifetime would not be easy, but the first would have to be Piet Kee playing the Buxtehude D minor Passacaglia at the St Laurens Kerk, Alkmaar.

 

Orchestral records would be a much harder choice, and at one time I would have taken the Oistrakh's recording of the Bach Double Violin Concerto, in spite of its unhistoric approach, but I grew tired of its mannerisms, and couldn't settle on any other recording, so I would take the score and enjoy perfect virtual performances.

 

The Chaconne from Bach's solo violin Partita in D minor is another essential, and I think that there is at least one recording that I could live with.

 

Sorry, I have rather a thing about D minor - but a wonderful thing about the island is that I would never have to hear the dreaded BWV565 ever again!

Link to post
Share on other sites
The BBC have been rambling on about the Desert Island Discs archives all week, and the thought occurred to me that organists rarely get a say. (I think Noel Rawsthorne once did a prgramme with the late Roy Plumley).

 

Anyway, I wonder if our personal selection of music would throw up any surprises; not forgetting the two luxury items of course, which cannot be the Bible or anythnig by Shakespeare.

 

I'll leave my selection 'til later......you wouldn't believe it.

 

MM

 

As the BBC clearly won't invite me, here goes...

 

Collected works of The Pet Shop Boys - cheerful (in the main) and something to bellow along with safe in the knowledge that nobody will be there to throw things at me.

 

"Songbird" - CD by Eva Cassidy.

 

Messiah - Kings/Willcocks

 

Howells Choral and Organ works - St Paul's CDs

 

Guilmant Organ Sonatas - Ben van Oosten/St Ouen

 

L'Oganiste de Notre Dame - Improvisations by Pierre Cochereau

 

As much Dupré played on Cavaillé organs as can be fitted onto a boxful of CDs

 

As much Mozart and Haydn as can be fitted onto a boxful of CDs

 

Books. The collected works of P G Wodehouse and of Terry Pratchett. Both are sufficiently prolific to allow me to read them all and then start again having forgotten every story in the intervening period.

 

Luxuries. The best hi-fi system money can buy but as this may be provided as a matter of course,1) an album containing all our holiday photos taken over the years, from our first holiday in Paris the year before we were married to this year's shots from an Exmoor farm and 2) my Stressless recliner. This presupposes that I can't have the organ from St Ouen... :P

 

 

I reserve the right to change this selection on an hourly basis for the rest of my days or until the ship sails, whichever comes sooner.

 

Edit 1 - I must have some Tallis choral.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose all of us would choose music that is part of our history, music that is a part of us. I started my life as a cathedral choirboy, learnt to play the ‘cello, went to University and music college – and my memories are, very much, reflected in my 10 'records' for my desert island - which would probably change, perhaps even daily!

 

However there are some pieces that will always be on the list which, in chronological order, I give below:

 

Palestrina - Super flumina Babylonis Four unaccompanied voices - Renaissance polyphony the final 'suspendimus' does things to me almost every time!!

 

Monteverdi - Sonata sopra Sancta Maria from 1610 Vespers’ I remember the first time I heard this and couldn't believe that the work dated from 1610 - the fusion of the invocation 'Sancta Maria, ora pro nobis' against a rich orchestral background amazing!

 

Bach - G major cello suite. I heard Casals playing unaccompanied Bach right at the end of his life. It was the most wonderful experience and made me cry.

 

Brahms - Symphony 2 D major. Brahms 'Italian' symphony full of big tunes full of fresh air!!

 

Vaughan Williams - Sea symphony. I love Vaughan Williams' music. I remember him well, as a small boy. That moment in the first movement where the choir begins 'Token of all brave captains and of all intrepid sailors and mates and of all that went down doing their duty'’ – this island race!!

 

Elgar - 'cello concerto - du Pre recording I learnt to play the Elgar when I was 15 and heard Du Pre play it with Barbirolli (who, himself had given the 2nd performance).

 

Berg - Violin concerto Alban Berg's violin concerto was written 'to the memory of an angel' I was bought a record of the piece (with the Bartok violin Rhapsodies on the reverse side), for Christmas, when I was about 12! My parents didn't like it or understand it and, at the time, I think that was, possibly, part of the attraction. Now, of course, I know it to be one of the great violin concertos in the repertoire.

 

Hindemith - Trauermusik for Viola and strings. I have asked that, at my funeral, the clergy do not preach and that, instead all present hear a performance of this short little piece, written on the day of the death of George V and performed on the BBC that night. The vla. (it exists in a vln. and vc. version) and piano version is no way as wonderful as the full string version but Hindemith’s harmony for the last movement, the Chorale 'Von deinem Thron tret ich hermit, O Gott' - 'Before thy throne, O God, I stand.' is just amazing!

 

I remember every performance I have ever heard of this piece from the very first, in the old Memorial Hall in Beverley on a Saturday night, when I suddenly realised that I wanted to be a musician!

 

Britten - Noyes Fludde.’ Genius is the only word I can find to describe Britten. His music is, all of it, superbly crafted. I can’t think of any bad Britten! His piano music sounds as if it was written by a pianist (it was!) and his cello music as if it was written by a cellist (it wasn't!). His vocal music shows a complete understanding of how the voice works!

 

Tallis' Canon, first in F, in unison, then in a two part canon, then a big organ (better mention the organ somewhere!) interruption followed by the hymn in simple 4 part harmony and then the great procession of out of the ark of the animals singing the hymn in 8 part canon against the most amazing orchestral ostinato - what a way to end a work!!

 

Stockhausen - Stimmung.’ I've heard this piece quite a number of times. It gives me peace and tranquillity in the busy day to day existence we have.

 

Apologies for the long post. I hope that, if you don’t know any of the above (all pretty standard stuff really!) you might enjoy listening to them!

 

(Since beginning writing there have been two other posts - and I've just realised I'm only supposed to have 8!! - hard luck!)

 

Books: Algernon Ashton's 'Truth, wit and wisdom' - a collection of letters, written by the composer, Ashton, to the newspapers between about 1890 and 1902 - and some Tom Sharpe - perverse, dangerous humour!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Of this is so difficult. I suppose I ought to take the opportuniy to get to know a completely new selection of music, but that would be a high risk strategy so I'm sticking with well-tried favourites that have never palled. In no particular order:

 

Tallis: Latin Church Music. Taverner Consort & Choir/Andrew Parrott. Sublime performances, especially on the first disc, done at the correct pitch (according to current thinking) without any falsettists. Oh those "Crump-tenors"!

 

Clara Schumann: Complete Songs. Gabriele Fontata and Konstanze Eickhorst. A rather under-rated composer.

 

Bach: Christmas Oratorio. Harnoncourt et al. His older recording. To be honest, it's not by any means the most meticulous performance around (original instrument techniques have improved immensely since this was made), but I like Harnoncourt's speeds and general interpretation. Harnoncourt has made a more recent (2005) DVD, which I have not seen.

 

Khachaturian: Spartacus, Masquerade & Gayaneh. London Symphony Orchestra/Stanley Black. The famous Adagio in Spartacus isn't nearly sumptuous enough for me (in fact it's rather pedestrian), but otherwise it's a thoroughly enjoyable programme.

 

Orlando Gibbons: Church Music. The Clerkes of Oxenford/David Wulstan. Wonderfully sophisticated, elegant music in equally sophisticated, beautifully judged performances. Not as technically meticulous as their subsequent, professional imitators, but none sing as musically as did the Clerkes. Some YouTube tracks here:

;
;
.

 

English Polyphonic Music. Choir of Magdalen College Oxford/ Bernard Rose. A CD remastering of an old LP. The sound quality is rather muddy by today's standards, but the performances are incomparably musical, with a genuine devotional atmosphere that almost seems a forgotten art on disc these days. A great reminder of what a fine musician Bernard Rose was.

 

Howells: Choral Music. Wells Cathedral Choir/Malcolm Archer. Very difficult choice between this and the recent CD from Winchester. I could easily live with either.

 

Duruflé: Requiem. You really can't beat the full orchestral version.

 

If all the discs were about to be washed away, the one I would save would have to be the Howells - whichever one I took.

 

My luxury would be Kirsty Young.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that if I were to be stranded on a desert island, I would have to have music which lifted my spirits., kept precious memories alive or kept me fit.

 

My first choice would be Michael Jackson's very beautiful and touching "Earth Song." (Sorry about the advert at the start)

 

 

I would be able to munch away at yet another coconut and feel terribly smug; knowing that my everyday existence was eco-friendly.

 

Gloria Gaynor's disco classic "I will survive" would be my early morning anthem: a chance to rush around, swing off branches and chase lizards just for the fun of it. It would also keep me fit.

 

 

Now when it comes to sing-alongs, they don't come any better than Handel's "Messiah," especially since I know the tenor and bass parts all the way through from memory; words included.

 

 

For those brooding moments of intellectual pausity, I would have to have something really challenging to listen to, such as the Brahm's 4th or the "Wedge" P & F, the latter of which I have never got to grips with.

 

I could make a dummy keyboard or two, and a pedal-board and try to teach myself the Bach by ear, and once exhausted, allow the Brahms to wash over me like an intellectual tide.

 

(Karajan especially)

 

(Michel Chapuis at his greatest on an organ I have played in the Netherlands)

 

Three to go, and to make me smile, laugh or just twist into an uncontrollable ball of mirth, I would have to have a full set of the P D Q Bach recordings.

 

 

For sheer enjoyment and light music pleasure, Zoe Burkett singing "I've got you under my skin." (At the time, just SIXTEEN YEARS OF AGE)

 

 

Lastly, for totally personal reasons, and memories which haunt me still.

 

Surely, one of THE most beautiful tunes ever written?

 

 

My two luxury items would be entirely practical: a Swiss Army Knife and an unbreakable bottle with a plastic screw cap.

 

MM

Link to post
Share on other sites
.

 

Congratulations to Vox Humana for posting what must be the shortest and most recondite message yet seen on this noble board.

 

Would he be kind enough to explain its meaning or message to a bear of very little brain.

 

Like Bernard Bresslaw, I only arsked.

 

David Harrison

Link to post
Share on other sites

Somebody will probably tell me it means something terribly rude in braille, but actually it was just a more energy efficient way of typing "Doh!" Basically I pressed the reply button instead of the edit and there is no function on this forum to delete posts.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had intended posting this a while ago but the broadband signal in our village appears to be conveyed by an arthritic pigeon who, in any case, has been having a few days off recently.

We’ve all indulged ourselves in the past with this particular flight of fancy and usually minds are changed as often as are Chelsea managers.

The top of my list would be occupied by Elgar’s Dream of Gerontius; I took part in David Willcocks’ first performance of this shortly after he arrived at Salisbury Cathedral in 1948. I was twelve and immediately hooked. A toss-up between the Britten recording and the Naxos with David Hill, especially for the contribution on the latter of my old friend William Kendall.

After that the choice becomes more difficult, what criteria should apply? Will it be just music and sounds without which one could not survive or will it be that together with an element of past memories pervading the selection? If the latter then the Lipatti recording of the Chopin Waltzes would have be there; it was a recording I discovered in the LP collection belonging to the lady who eventually became my wife.

I would want to take with me a radio recording of the Thalassa Symphony by Arthur Somervell. For those of you who know AS only through a few hymn tunes, A Shropshire Lad and The Cross of Christ this Symphony in D minor might well come as a revelation with one of the most gorgeous slow movements written in the last century. Sadly, there is no commercial recording of it yet, but Hyperion seems to have found out that he exists and I live in hope.

I would have to take a recording by my son-in-law, Adrian Lucas; I think his latest CD, made on the Tickell organ in Worcester Cathedral will do nicely; it contains the Ruebke Sonata and Vierne 1. I had half an hour on the organ while helping him with the microphone balance for the recording sessions. In the last three years it’s the only time I have actually played the thing.

At this point, I am going to disappoint everyone deeply and confess myself to be the ultimate and definitive philistine. My ‘problem’ is that much of my listening is not to music at all but to my other passion - vintage radio comedy. I wonder whether I might possibly find MM in sympathetic mood here. No, I mustn’t be so presumptuous. Nevertheless, a Navy Lark, a Men from the Ministry, an All Gas and Gaiters - those would keep me entertained and laughing for a while. I don’t mind in the least hearing them several times as, for me, good humour is as enduring as good music.

But back to music and I have got to include something from the Tudor period; Robert Parsons’ Ave Maria has got to be one of the most sensual pieces of music ever written; it’s almost erotic! I’d like to take virtually anything by Orlando Gibbons; probably Hosanna to the Son of David to remind me of schooldays.

If I were to stipulate that the three radio comedy programmes would be a compilation on one CD then I would, presumably, be eligible for one more. Considering that fact that my one luxury would probably have to be a bath chair in view of my advancing years and generally decrepit physical state then the Verdi Requiem would get the nod; I would take an old mono recording on DGG by Ferenc Fricsay. It’s probably the fastest performance on record but it is one of great drama and intensity and the circumstances surrounding the recording sessions are remarkable in themselves.

Books? The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, confirming to one and all that I have a jackdaw mind. I hope to find, also, a decent Hi-Fi, with speakers made by Tannoy of gargantuan size, the better to enjoy the lowest frequencies of organ and bass drum. Well, it’s the only thrill you’re going to get on a deserted island.

I’ll let you have tomorrow's list tomorrow.

David Harrison

Link to post
Share on other sites
At this point, I am going to disappoint everyone deeply and confess myself to be the ultimate and definitive philistine. My ‘problem’ is that much of my listening is not to music at all but to my other passion - vintage radio comedy. I wonder whether I might possibly find MM in sympathetic mood here. No, I mustn’t be so presumptuous. Nevertheless, a Navy Lark, a Men from the Ministry, an All Gas and Gaiters - those would keep me entertained and laughing for a while. I don’t mind in the least hearing them several times as, for me, good humour is as enduring as good music.

 

Oh yes! I too love these and always try to listen to the 12.00 slot on Radio 4 Extra on DAB. Slightly more modern was Radio Active, my all time favourite and of which I have many cassette tape recordings.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't need much tempting to stow away a ninth disc of Goon Shows - preferably in mp3 conversions so I could get them all onto one CD.

 

Looking at people's lists above, I get the impression that some of us aren't too fussed about organ music! :P

Link to post
Share on other sites
I wouldn't need much tempting to stow away a ninth disc of Goon Shows - preferably in mp3 conversions so I could get them all onto one CD.

 

.......ditto here though I'd take The News Quiz!

 

A

Link to post
Share on other sites

Britten - War Requiem

 

JSB - Mass in B minor

 

Vaughan Williams - Symphony V (or possibly VI)

 

Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring

 

Messiaen - L'ascension

 

Brahms - Piano Concerto no. 1

 

Beatles - Greatest Hits

 

Miles Davis - Kind of Blue

Link to post
Share on other sites
I wonder whether I might possibly find MM in sympathetic mood here. No, I mustn't be so presumptuous. Nevertheless, a Navy Lark, a Men from the Ministry, an All Gas and Gaiters - those would keep me entertained and laughing for a while. I don't mind in the least hearing them several times as, for me, good humour is as enduring as good music.

 

 

 

David Harrison

 

==========================

 

 

Absolutely! The problem is, really good humour is actually quite rare, and very difficult to write. Of the classics, my favourites would include (from both TV and Radio), almost anything connected with the late Peter Ustinov, "Misleading Cases" by A P Herbert, "Black Adder" (all of them), "Yes Minister!" Gerald Hoffnung and the aforementioned P D Q Bach.

 

However, I really cannot believe that one of the funniest things ever made on film, "The last Englishman," starring Jim Broadbent (based on the factual story), is now no longer available. This is the wartime story of Lt.Col.George Wintel, who was as eccentric as he was brilliant. It feautured in a TV series entitled "Heroes & Villains," and it is simply the most hilarious, touching and inspiring military drama-documentary I have ever seen.

 

I have been looking for a copy of this for over ten years, but thus far without success.

 

Of course, some of the best humour comes from memories of actual events rather than records or films, and these I treasure.

 

Dr Runcie, when told that Dr Ian Paisley "wanted ta 'av waards wi' the Archbiship o' Canterburi," (because he was going to celebrate Mass with the Pope), promptly replied, "I would be delighted to talk to Dr Paisley at anytime. All he has to do, is to walk across the water to Canterbury!"

 

Then H R H Prince Philip is not short of wit, such as the time he was led towards a group of people who trained "Blind Dogs," and had assembled a bit of a display for him.

 

He spontaneously said to them, "Is it true; they're going to have eating dogs for the anorexic?"

 

English humour is second to none, at its best.

 

MM

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ian Partridge singing Peter Warlock - either The Curlew, or a good selection of songs, or both

 

Wilfred Brown singing Finzi's Dies Natalis

 

Most of Brian Wilson's output from Pet Sounds onwards

 

A sprinkling of Lonnie Donegan (I know, but I can't resist the stuff)

 

Hurford's recording of the Six Trio Sonatas (I know, but they're compelling without any of the quirks of Koopman)

 

The complete Goon Shows (and you can download the whole lot for about 10 quid from a site called something like Radio Sunday)

 

The complete Hancock's Half Hours (likewise)

 

Then that leaves me torn between Joni Mitchell and Leonard Cohen... actually, I'll have them both, and leave the Bach behind.

Link to post
Share on other sites
English Polyphonic Music. Choir of Magdalen College Oxford/ Bernard Rose. A CD remastering of an old LP. The sound quality is rather muddy by today's standards, but the performances are incomparably musical, with a genuine devotional atmosphere that almost seems a forgotten art on disc these days. A great reminder of what a fine musician Bernard Rose was.

 

 

I agree, it's my DID Number 1. If allowed only one track, it would have to be Tomkins' Almighty God, the fountain of all goodness - such hauntingly beautiful, ethereal singing with astonishing, hair-raising false relations.

 

Re-issued it was, but alas no longer available, as I understand.

 

JS

Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree, it's my DID Number 1. If allowed only one track, it would have to be Tomkins' Almighty God, the fountain of all goodness - such hauntingly beautiful, ethereal singing with astonishing, hair-raising false relations.

 

Re-issued it was, but alas no longer available, as I understand.

 

JS

 

This always makes me smile due to the abbreviated way it is usually announced as an anthem. "Almighty God the fountain. Music by Tomkins". :P:lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree, it's my DID Number 1. If allowed only one track, it would have to be Tomkins' Almighty God, the fountain of all goodness - such hauntingly beautiful, ethereal singing with astonishing, hair-raising false relations.

I totally agree. A wonderfully moving performance of a real masterpiece. Nicholson's O pray for the peace comes a close second.

 

Re-issued it was, but alas no longer available, as I understand.

When did you last check? When I first enquired about it a couple of years back it was no longer available, but round about May of last year I had an email from OxRecs saying that more copies had been made, whereupon I slapped my order in. It might have sold out again of course...

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is always a good topic.

 

Carl Jung used to paint a mandala at the beginning of each day to assess the state of his soul. I compile my Desert Island Discs each month for similar reasons. Most of them stay the same but a few change, reflecting new discoveries and enthusiasms.

 

My list is a mixture of music I love in 'absolute' terms, and music that holds special memories for me, as follows.

 

Mahler 3rd symphony ; Bernstein My love of classical music undoubtedly started when, as a very young child, I would lie in bed and listen to my father (a great Mahlerian) playing his records downstairs. In this way I got to know all the Beethoven symphonies and all the Mozart piano concertos without realising it by the age of 8 or so. I always loved hearing Mahler, who has remained a lifelong passion, and this piece also reminds me of my father to whom I owe so much, musically and otherwise.

 

Vittoria Requiem ; Tallis Scholars. Arriving at Oxford saw me sing this piece with Schola Cantorum in my second term, the beginning of a realisation that singing could be more than a mere hobby, it could move up to level of excellence.

 

Monteverdi Vespers of 1610 ; Parrott. Another piece I grew to love at Oxford. Also a personal memory as it was recorded at my old church (All Saints', Tooting) and I was lucky enough to sing in a performance with Andrew Parrott at the Proms a few years later - a real highlight of my (amateur) singing career.

 

Bach ; Well Tempered Clavier in the latest Angela Hewitt recording. The one piece of Bach I would have (although all 8 could be Bach) ; inexhaustible in every way.

 

Genesis ; In the Cage and following medley from 'Three Sides Live'. I am delighted at how many board members have chosen pop music. This music reminds me of teenage years, of first love, of the three fantastic Genesis concerts I have been to, of how much joy music can contain and of the great pleasure I have always taken in pop music, both highbrow and low.

 

Prokofieff ; Romeo and Juliet Simply because I love every note

 

Mozart ; Don Giovanni - Kiri te Kanawa and Thomas Allen / Glyndebourne. The beginning of a lifelong love affair with Mozart.

 

Durufle ; Prelude, Adagio & Chorale Varie sur le Veni Creator - John Scott. The one piece of organ music I would have, because I cannot ignore the central role playing the organ has had in my musical life, because it is such a beautiful piece, and because it reminds me of one of my own best performances.

 

Book ; Remembrance of Things Past

 

Luxury ; my electric toothbrush. All things in life are possible, or at least bearable, if I can have enough sleep and can clean my teeth properly.

 

Regards to all

M

Link to post
Share on other sites

Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis My all-time favourite piece of music. The Barbirolli recording is my favourite, although any Boult recording of RVW is definitive. I've always wondered why there wasn't an organ transcription of it - so I made my own a couple of years ago.

 

Praetorius Christmas Mass Gabrieli Consort. Marvellously cheerful stuff, beautifully produced. Fun-sounding organ (Roskilde) too.

 

The King of Instruments LP which probably inspired all organists of my generation. Everyone remembers Francis Jackson's Cocker - James Thomas mentioned it in the opening remarks to his recital at Ely a couple of Sundays ago.

 

Similarly, a compilation - was it called Organs of Europe or something like that? - which featured Bach and Buxtehude on North German instruments, Scheidt at Frederiksborg, Clerambault at Souvigny, Purcell at Adlington, Handel on a claviorganum, Wesley (?) at Rotherhithe and Spanish fireworks (Braga?). A bit vague, here, because I got rid of all my LPs when I moved here - something had to go.....

 

The Psalms of David - Willcocks and King's, the first volume. But also The World of Psalms, which is mostly George Guest and St. John's, with one track of Willcocks and one of Westminster Abbey (McKie) to fill up the space on a CD.

 

Something with David Munrow.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Similarly, a compilation - was it called Organs of Europe or something like that? - which featured Bach and Buxtehude on North German instruments, Scheidt at Frederiksborg, Clerambault at Souvigny, Purcell at Adlington, Handel on a claviorganum, Wesley (?) at Rotherhithe and Spanish fireworks (Braga?). A bit vague, here, because I got rid of all my LPs when I moved here - something had to go.....

 

That is ORYX EXP 5.

 

Three anon faburdens and a Tiento by Peraza at Covarrubias, Spain.

Scheidt at Frederikborg Palace, Denmark.

Louis Marchand on a Cliquot at Souvigny

Purcell at Adlington Hall.

Handel on a claviorganum

Samuel Wesley at Rotherhithe,

Pachelbel at Trebel.

Buxtehude at Steinkirchen.

J S Bach at Neuenfelder.

J S Bach at Arlesheim.

 

Played by Chaplet, Chapuis, Jackson, Michael Thomas, Danby, Helmut Winter, Saorgin, Schonstedt, and Rogg.

 

It probably cost me at least £1.

Link to post
Share on other sites
That is ORYX EXP 5.

 

Three anon faburdens and a Tiento by Peraza at Covarrubias, Spain.

Scheidt at Frederikborg Palace, Denmark.

Louis Marchand on a Cliquot at Souvigny

Purcell at Adlington Hall.

Handel on a claviorganum

Samuel Wesley at Rotherhithe,

Pachelbel at Trebel.

Buxtehude at Steinkirchen.

J S Bach at Neuenfelder.

J S Bach at Arlesheim.

 

Played by Chaplet, Chapuis, Jackson, Michael Thomas, Danby, Helmut Winter, Saorgin, Schonstedt, and Rogg.

 

It probably cost me at least £1.

 

That's the one! I was quite captivated with it at the time and a lot of the pieces have been in my core repertoire ever since (especially the Scheidt!).

 

Speaking of Rogg, his recording of the Hindemith Sonatas was an inspiration to me around the same time. I still think they're among the finest pieces of organ music of the twentieth century.

Link to post
Share on other sites
.............recording of the Hindemith Sonatas was an inspiration to me around the same time. I still think they're among the finest pieces of organ music of the twentieth century.

 

 

Hindemith was a true craftsman, wasn't he? Of course he was well known, in his day, as a wonderful viola player but I'm told by friends who play various instruments that the instrumental sonatas and the concertos feel, to play, as if they were written by someone who thoroughly understood the workings of that particular instrument and, of course, there are sonatas for almost all orchestral instruments, including Bass Tuba and concerto's for quite a number of them. I played both the 'cello sonatas and one of the concerti and it certainly seemed like that to me.

 

The 'Trauermuisik' for vla. and strings will go with me to my desert island and will be played at my funeral - in place of the clergy preaching!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...