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Guilty Pleasures

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I'm sure all of us must have pieces of music that we quite enjoy, but would be rather ashamed to admit it.

 

Yesterday for our Harvest Festival, our choir sang Maunder's 'Sing to the Lord of harvest' as the anthem in the morning (he of 'Olivet to Calvary' fame). Yes, its obscenely Victorian in style, with a mushy 6/8 section (added the tremulants) and a rather amusing take on 'By him the crowds drop fatness' (which saw the 32' Bourdon used). Alright, its musical twaddle, but the congregation loved it (loads of positive comments) and I think the choir quite enjoyed it too for a 'let your hair down' moment. You have to get into the spirit of it and make the most of it and thats what we did. I'm not sure a Cathedral congregation would have been quite as appreciative, mind...

 

Another which springs to mind in terms of choral music is Bryan Kelly's Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis in C. Yes, they lack musical integrity, but I do quite enjoy them on occasion in the right setting (obviously they wouldn't sit well alongside Byrd or Tallis though!).

 

What are your 'guilty pleasures' then? And how many posts before someone confesses that they actually like that Sortie in E flat?!

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I'm sure all of us must have pieces of music that we quite enjoy, but would be rather ashamed to admit it.

 

Yesterday for our Harvest Festival, our choir sang Maunder's 'Sing to the Lord of harvest' as the anthem in the morning (he of 'Olivet to Calvary' fame). Yes, its obscenely Victorian in style, with a mushy 6/8 section (added the tremulants) and a rather amusing take on 'By him the crowds drop fatness' (which saw the 32' Bourdon used). Alright, its musical twaddle, but the congregation loved it (loads of positive comments) and I think the choir quite enjoyed it too for a 'let your hair down' moment. You have to get into the spirit of it and make the most of it and thats what we did. I'm not sure a Cathedral congregation would have been quite as appreciative, mind...

 

Another which springs to mind in terms of choral music is Bryan Kelly's Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis in C. Yes, they lack musical integrity, but I do quite enjoy them on occasion in the right setting (obviously they wouldn't sit well alongside Byrd or Tallis though!).

 

What are your 'guilty pleasures' then? And how many posts before someone confesses that they actually like that Sortie in E flat?!

 

'By him the crowds drop fatness'? Sounds interesting. Should it be 'clouds'? Sidney Nicholson set these words, entirely respectably but nicely.

 

I'm rather partial to a bit of Stainer from time to time. 'I saw the Lord', of course, but also 'O Zion that bringest good tidings', 'What are these?' and the Mag and Nunc in B flat. 'How beautiful upon the mountains' is a gem, worthy of any choir, but it comes from a larger work, 'Awake, put on thy strength, O Zion', bits of which are vulgar enough for anyone's taste and which contains the line 'Arise and sit down, O Jerusalem'.

 

Guilty as charged with regard to the Sortie in E flat. The Andante in F for Vox and twittering flute goes down a bomb with the old ladies, too.

 

Sibelius Music has a free downloadable version of the March of the Peers from 'Iolanthe' by Sullivan, which is a lot of fun.

 

The long-serving DoM of the Church Lads Brigade Band died last week. At the end of the funeral, the band played 'Our Conductor' (a good march) and I played 'Liberty Bell'.

 

There are some things - like 'Bringing in the sheaves' - that sound wonderful when played by a Salvation Army Band, but dreadfully vulgar under other circumstances.

 

Everyone, I guess, plays Saint-Saens' 'The Swan', but the Elephants' Waltz can be a hit, tune played on the pedal (32' reed if available). I played both before the Blessing of the Animals Service last Saturday (but it's so noisy at that service that you can play anything. I think bits of 'How much is that doggy in the window', 'The Pink Panther' and 'Tiger Rag' may have crept in. I have worked out what combinations make the dogs howl :rolleyes: ).

 

Isn't it strange how you can spend ages learning one of the masterpieces of the repertoire, but if you include it in a programme which also contains Lemare's Andantino in D flat, Handel's Largo or Dvorak's Largo from the New World, those are the pieces which everyone thinks were wonderful?

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Of course David - you are right and a typo on my part. Psalm 65, of course.

 

Stainer probably comes into the category too - I do like 'I saw the Lord'.

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Mailly - Marche Solenelle :rolleyes:

 

 

I play his Toccata, which is fairly vulgar and not particularly difficult. There are several like that in the dover book of Toccatas, Carillons and Scherzos, edited by Rollin Smith, including one by Percy Fletcher that used to be quite popular.

 

While I am at it, I suppose I'd better confess to playing Scotson Clark's Marche aux Flambeaux from time to time.....

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'By him the crowds drop fatness'? Sounds interesting. Should it be 'clouds'? Sidney Nicholson set these words, entirely respectably but nicely.

 

I'm rather partial to a bit of Stainer from time to time. 'I saw the Lord', of course, but also 'O Zion that bringest good tidings', 'What are these?' and the Mag and Nunc in B flat. 'How beautiful upon the mountains' is a gem, worthy of any choir, but it comes from a larger work, 'Awake, put on thy strength, O Zion', bits of which are vulgar enough for anyone's taste and which contains the line 'Arise and sit down, O Jerusalem'.

 

Guilty as charged with regard to the Sortie in E flat. The Andante in F for Vox and twittering flute goes down a bomb with the old ladies, too.

 

Sibelius Music has a free downloadable version of the March of the Peers from 'Iolanthe' by Sullivan, which is a lot of fun.

 

The long-serving DoM of the Church Lads Brigade Band died last week. At the end of the funeral, the band played 'Our Conductor' (a good march) and I played 'Liberty Bell'.

 

There are some things - like 'Bringing in the sheaves' - that sound wonderful when played by a Salvation Army Band, but dreadfully vulgar under other circumstances.

 

Everyone, I guess, plays Saint-Saens' 'The Swan', but the Elephants' Waltz can be a hit, tune played on the pedal (32' reed if available). I played both before the Blessing of the Animals Service last Saturday (but it's so noisy at that service that you can play anything. I think bits of 'How much is that doggy in the window', 'The Pink Panther' and 'Tiger Rag' may have crept in. I have worked out what combinations make the dogs howl <_< ).

 

Isn't it strange how you can spend ages learning one of the masterpieces of the repertoire, but if you include it in a programme which also contains Lemare's Andantino in D flat, Handel's Largo or Dvorak's Largo from the New World, those are the pieces which everyone thinks were wonderful?

 

 

============================

 

Ah! The delights of "L'Elephant"............

 

I recall playing the pedal part in a duet arranged for piano and organ.....well....not really arranged, just hammed. It was all to do with an RSPCA service at Halifax PC.

 

The Doppel Flute made an excellent "Cuckoo"

 

My current guilty pleasure is when the old Irish Catholics want to sing sickly, sentimental religious words to the tune of, "O Danny Boy."

 

No tremulants or Vox Humana. I find that it takes on a whole new piquancy with just the Rohrflute accompanying the melody picked out on a mildly chiffing Koppel Flute.

 

It's like Danny Boy with whooping cough.

 

MM

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I almost feel ashamed to post this, but I have a volume of voluntaries for the harmonium by Caleb Simper - yes, he is real! It is something like volume 32 on its 4th reprint!

From this, I occasionally play "melody in F" and "Postlude in E minor"

The Edwardian sugar is almost unbearable but they are both effective for what they are, and I always find I have a smile on my face whilst playing them!

 

Having put this in writing I now feel like I have owned up to a shameful crime!!!!

 

Best wishes

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I play his Toccata, which is fairly vulgar and not particularly difficult. There are several like that in the dover book of Toccatas, Carillons and Scherzos, edited by Rollin Smith, including one by Percy Fletcher that used to be quite popular.

 

While I am at it, I suppose I'd better confess to playing Scotson Clark's Marche aux Flambeaux from time to time.....

 

Indeed, a fun book; 'that' Mulet piece is in it as well, another for one this list ;-)

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I almost feel ashamed to post this, but I have a volume of voluntaries for the harmonium by Caleb Simper - yes, he is real! It is something like volume 32 on its 4th reprint!

From this, I occasionally play "melody in F" and "Postlude in E minor"

The Edwardian sugar is almost unbearable but they are both effective for what they are, and I always find I have a smile on my face whilst playing them!

 

Having put this in writing I now feel like I have owned up to a shameful crime!!!!

 

Best wishes

 

Hi

 

Nothing to be ashamed of! I too sometimes play Simper. They're not great music, but they're tuneful - and simple enough to sight read - and they transfer well to Harmonium or American Organ - and go down well with my congregation. Since I'm still getting over a hip replacement, and pedalling isn't yet totally comfortable, I used 2 of Simpers pieces on Sunday, so I didn't have to practice for too long!

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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Does anyone know if T Mee Pattison's albums of voluntaries are still in print? I binned mine many years ago in a fit of adolescent pretensiousness (I was actually about 22). This thread has got me thinking that I should revisit them.

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I played Sortie from the Petite Suite in Blue (by J M Michel - in one of the Jazz Inspirations books) on Sunday. It was one of our "All-age" services, after which I indulge in this sort of stuff. The congregation loved it!

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You lot might as well pack in this thread, 'cos I've got you all beat - I get first prize - no arguments - some forty years ago I inherited a full set of ......... wait for it......... CLOISTER ALBUMS. They remained unopened and pristine for all of those forty years, until three weeks ago. I was asked for the 'Dresden Amen' at a couple of hours notice for a funeral service.

On the point of giving voice to my regrets that I was unable to provide it for them, not having the music available, nor any idea where it might be found in playable form ...... 'click', 'click','click' went the aged old neurons - "I wonder if ...?" Yep, there it was, in the red-cover volume of the set. Nice big handfuls of sweet slushy stuff. Went down a treat.

So, do I win ?

 

Chris Baker - Durham UK

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You lot might as well pack in this thread, 'cos I've got you all beat - I get first prize - no arguments - some forty years ago I inherited a full set of ......... wait for it......... CLOISTER ALBUMS. They remained unopened and pristine for all of those forty years, until three weeks ago. I was asked for the 'Dresden Amen' at a couple of hours notice for a funeral service.

On the point of giving voice to my regrets that I was unable to provide it for them, not having the music available, nor any idea where it might be found in playable form ...... 'click', 'click','click' went the aged old neurons - "I wonder if ...?" Yep, there it was, in the red-cover volume of the set. Nice big handfuls of sweet slushy stuff. Went down a treat.

So, do I win ?

 

Chris Baker - Durham UK

 

 

I think it's cheating to include the Cloister Albums. They include some perfectly respectable and quite imaginative selections among the candy! The Dregstown Amen appears at the back of many hymnals, especially nonconformist ones, to say nothing of turning up quite a lot in Stanford in B flat.

 

Ronald Binge's Elizabethan Serenade was a big hit last Wednesday lunch-time. Thanks, David Patrick, for the copy!

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Hi

 

Nothing to be ashamed of! I too sometimes play Simper. They're not great music, but they're tuneful - and simple enough to sight read - and they transfer well to Harmonium or American Organ - and go down well with my congregation. Since I'm still getting over a hip replacement, and pedalling isn't yet totally comfortable, I used 2 of Simpers pieces on Sunday, so I didn't have to practice for too long!

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

 

 

=================================

 

 

Well, think positive!

 

At least you can claim to have introduced 'hip-hop' into the worship experience!

 

Hope you soon get better.

 

MM

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