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What Organs Are Being Built In The Uk?


Guest stevecbournias

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In the same episode, Ian Tracey was shown playing some grand piece or other. The soundtrack was exciting; we were then treated to a close-up shot of Ian playing - with the wind switched off. (The piston channel LEDs were un-lit.)

 

Why do TV companies allow this? Howard Goodall should have known better - unless, of course, he did not watch that part of the day's 'rushes'.

 

=============

 

 

Nun Danket - Karg-Elert, if I recall correctly.

 

You mean the Prof was faking it for the cameras?

 

He should have been banished to Radio 1 and "Top of the pops."

 

:P

 

MM

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It would be good to have some information available on new instruments - and rebuilds, in this country.

 

OR used to run a column on this subject; however, it then turned into a lecture from John Norman on various technical aspects of organ building and design.

 

Personally, I did not find this so useful or interesting, since the technical information is readily available in a number of existing publications.

 

Is anyone else interested in such a column?

 

Hi

 

Yes - it would, if it's reliable! Organ Building (the IBO annual journal) has a summary, but the latest one is far from complete in its listings (I've just finished NPOR updates from the info. in Organ Building 2005 - apart from one organ that I've had to e-mail the builder about, and have not yet received a reply (not an unknown state of affairs!) I've also had to check various web-sites - all very time consuming. It seems to me that the main interest in the journal is the detailed technical/design articles on various new organs and rebuilds/restorations, which are very interesting.

 

"The Organ" runs a regular "new installations" column, but that's even further from being comprehensive than "Organ Building". Maybe the IBO could be persuaded to publish the answers to its annual survey of organ building activity on its web site? That would be better than nothing, but still would not include the work of firms who are not IBO members (Peter Collins for one!).

 

NPOR does include surveys of new organs, etc. as we get the information, but you need to know that a new organ has been built to look for the survey, so that doesn't help in this context.

 

Like many things, it would be nice - but is it really practical to produce such a listing?

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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I enjoy John Norman's column in OR. It tends to be one of the first things I look at. I would not know where else to look for the same information; I am not even sure I would want to wade through it if I did.

 

Sometimes being fed tit-bits is just right.

 

But surely the OR is a big enough publication to incorporate a page on what organbuilders are up to as well. Basil Ramsey used to fit ever so much information into a terribly small space thirty years ago.

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Guest Roffensis

Chichester is a gem!

The programme with Ian Tracey on (Goodall) was done at St Georges Hall, Liverpool, on the fairest Father Willis of them all. It is most certainly also the organ that is heard on the soundtrack, whether done at the same time or not, and I can't say I noticed that it wasn't....I'll have to have a look!!

R

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Guest paul@trinitymusic.karoo.co.uk
However, Willis was brilliant spin doctor and the reputation of Willis organs has much to do with the reputation and mystique he created.

 

Sorry to take issue with you,

and this may be only my opinion, (but I doubt it):

 

I rate Fr.Henry Willis a genius - firmly in my top handful of organ builders throughout history. You personally might not like his organs (they were not uniformly approved of when new either, and I would concede that not all are equally beautiful, not all equally servants of the repertoire) but they

1. are to a standard, uniformly high in terms of reliability and tonal quality - i.e. finish

2. still inspire respect in each new generation of players and listeners.

I never met Fr.Willis, so any 'spin doctor' aspect of his life is entirely by-the-by. If you want to credit him with any sort of 'inside track' to success, I would suggest that it was the fact that he was a practising organist himself and he knew what results he wanted, even from the smallest specification. He (and his co-workers) then developed a method for achieving these results consistently.

 

The fact that Willis organs are always immediately snapped up when they are looking for new homes should tell you that the success of that man (and his immediate successors) has nothing to do with charisma and all to do with the effectiveness of their creations.

 

In case you're wondering about others in my top 10 - Renatus Harris and William Hill would be there too. For me, these achieved results (in their respective ways) on a par with the Cliquot family, the Schnitgers and Aristide C-C. I've never heard a Skinner live, but I have a shrewd suspicion that he ought to be rated up there too.

Some builders are definitely leaders, and their success is (naturally) much copied. H&H unashamedly copied Willis, seeking to improve on such aspects as their mentor (Col.Dixon) considered weak points. Schulze had his disciples. Several lesser firms imitated C-C (and now that the pendulum has really swung back, several contemporary builders are seriously trying to copy his style of voicing). Seriously, has anyone come really close to matching his results yet?

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Chichester is a gem!

The programme with Ian Tracey on (Goodall) was done at St Georges Hall, Liverpool, on the fairest Father Willis of them all. It is most certainly also the organ that is heard on the soundtrack, whether done at the same time or not, and I can't say I noticed that it wasn't....I'll have to have a look!! 

R

 

I can confirm that it was the instrument used on the soundtrack - a colleague was assisting Ian Tracey (off-camera) and told me exactly how the shoot had happened. The sound was recorded and later (as once happened to me) Ian Tracey was filmed for the close-up shots. The crew then put the two together. Unfortunately, whether through an omission on Ian Tracey's part, or the crew's - I do not know, the organ was not actually switched on for the close-up shots.

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Some builders are definitely leaders, and their success is (naturally) much copied. H&H unashamedly copied Willis, seeking to improve on such aspects as their mentor (Col.Dixon) considered weak points.

 

Paul, I agree with many of your points - apart from that which I have quoted.

 

I would have said that Arthur Harrison (with guidance from Col. Dixon) strove to plough a new furrow, in a manner of speaking. Tonally, his organs are so unlike anything which FHW did. His treatment of chorus reeds was completely different.

 

Surely an Arthur Harrison organ is about contrasts* - the Swell reeds with the GO reeds, the Swell chorus with the GO - one thin and bright, the other fat, with leathered diapasons (I know that he also leathered Swell diapasons occasionally, too!) and opaque trombi, for quasi-tuba effects. AH was also the first (as you no doubt know) fully to develop the tonal architecture of the modern Solo Organ, with a chorus of strings at Ely in 1908; (Durham were, of course, only prepared-for, in 1905).

 

However, this is a really interesting development in this thread!

 

*Whereas FHW strove to provide similitude - for example, in his treatment of mixtures (c.f. Truro - both breaking back an octave at treble F#). Look at Lincoln - apart from an undulating rank (well, two, now that CW had H&H re-tune the second Open Diapason as a Voce Umana) a Vox Humana and the nomenclature of the flutes, the GO and Swell stoplists are almost interchangable!

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Sorry to take issue with you,

and this may be only my opinion, (but I doubt it):

 

I rate Fr.Henry Willis a genius - firmly in my top handful of organ builders throughout history.  You personally might not like his organs (they were not uniformly approved of when new either, and I would concede that not all are equally beautiful, not all equally servants of the repertoire) but they

1. are to a standard, uniformly high in terms of reliability and tonal quality - i.e. finish

2. still inspire respect in each new generation of players and listeners.

I never met Fr.Willis, so any 'spin doctor' aspect of his life is entirely by-the-by.  If you want to credit him with any sort of 'inside track' to success, I would suggest that it was the fact that he was a practising organist himself and he knew what results he wanted, even from the smallest specification. He (and his co-workers) then developed a method for achieving these results consistently.

 

The fact that Willis organs are always immediately snapped up when they are looking for new homes should tell you that the success of that man (and his immediate successors) has nothing to do with charisma and all to do with the effectiveness of their creations.

 

In case you're wondering about others in my top 10 - Renatus Harris and William Hill would be there too. For me, these achieved results (in their respective ways) on a par with the Cliquot family, the Schnitgers and Aristide C-C. I've never heard a Skinner live, but I have a shrewd suspicion that he ought to be rated up there too.

Some builders are definitely leaders, and their success is (naturally) much copied. H&H unashamedly copied Willis, seeking to improve on such aspects as their mentor (Col.Dixon) considered weak points. Schulze had his disciples. Several lesser firms imitated C-C (and now that the pendulum has really swung back, several contemporary builders are seriously trying to copy his style of voicing). Seriously, has anyone come really close to matching his results yet?

Hi Paul,

 

I can see why you felt my words were perhaps a slur on Father Willis. Every organ I've played of his has left me with the overriding impression of a superbly engineered machine: the way his organs work mechanically is usually superb and I admire the very smooth build up and blend of the voices. Certainly, I wouldn't turn my nose up at them.

 

However, I don't think it pays to be wholly uncritical of his work and I would make the following observations:

 

Basically, Willis seems to have in his tonal repertoire:

3 flutes (Lee Blick Gedact, Claribel Flute, Harmonic Flute)

3 strings (salicional, Gambe, Open Diapason)

and his reeds, which also tend to be fairly standardised across his organs.

 

His organs, while they sound impressive in big spaces, are not suited to small spaces where they sound harsh and unforgiving. If I was looking for an organ transplant for a small church and I had the option between a comparable Hill and Willis, I know which one I'd have...

 

They don't really have a good organo pleno - for playing Bach, his contempories or predecessors. So playing Bach becomes quite a compromise - either you let full swell muddy the last few pages of the fugue if you're going for glory or you're left with relatively tiny sounds which don't exploit the power of the Willis organ, leaving listeners bereft of the grandeur and power of Bach's organ music.

 

I'm not entirely sure how much credit to give Father Willis. Vincent certainly seems to hold a lot of the patents for the actions and innovations and I wonder how much credit he deserves for the success of the Willis organ.

 

They are very much organs of the period - of mechanical ingenity and engineering, getting it to work well. There's also that element of commericialism - viz. the zinc 32' front at the (do I say this or not?) Alexandra Palace as FHW realised he could get the same sounds out of it as the tin front at the RAH but making it cheaper, the loss of casework so you could spend more on stops for the money. To me, the standardisation and commerical interest started tp pave the way for extension organs and all those things the organ reform movement sought to expurge.

 

However, while some of FHW's disciples may have made mistakes and not lived up to the quality of their inspiration, I have to revoice (sorry) my admiration of Willis organs - those I've heard or played have left me impressed. The way they work always feels smooth, reliable and beautifully engineered and I've really enjoyed playing those I've got my sticky mits on . Musically, I feel they're quite machine like - they hit you more like a lump of machined iron from a machine than the wood and leather from a musical instrument, if you know what I mean.

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"Basically, Willis seems to have in his tonal repertoire:

3 flutes (Lee Blick Gedact, Claribel Flute, Harmonic Flute)

3 strings (salicional, Gambe, Open Diapason)

and his reeds, which also tend to be fairly standardised across his organs.

 

His organs, while they sound impressive in big spaces, are not suited to small spaces where they sound harsh and unforgiving. If I was looking for an organ transplant for a small church and I had the option between a comparable Hill and Willis, I know which one I'd have...

 

They don't really have a good organo pleno - for playing Bach, his contempories or predecessors. So playing Bach becomes quite a compromise - either you let full swell muddy the last few pages of the fugue if you're going for glory or you're left with relatively tiny sounds which don't exploit the power of the Willis organ, leaving listeners bereft of the grandeur and power of Bach's organ music"

 

(Quote)

 

Maybe this should be called: "to shot in his own foot".

 

Many french, belgians and germans read this forum.

The germans do the same with their own romantic organs,

while the french praise their Cavaillé-Colls.

Maybe it's not surprising the "neo-romantic" trend of today

deals only with Cavaillé-Coll's style -like Schnitger was the sole

"correct" style 30 years ago-.

And round and round...

 

Best wishes,

Pierre

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They don't really have a good organo pleno - for playing Bach, his contempories or predecessors. So playing Bach becomes quite a compromise - either you let full swell muddy the last few pages of the fugue if you're going for glory or you're left with relatively tiny sounds which don't exploit the power of the Willis organ, leaving listeners bereft of the grandeur and power of Bach's organ music.
Isn't this a bit like criticising Schnitgers for not being able to handle an orchestral crescendo? The whole ethos was different in them thar days and it's surely pushing it a bit to take FHW to task for not designing organs future generations would require.

 

And isn't it over-egging the case to see his cost cutting as the cause of everyone else's subsequent economies? Cost cutting is a fact of business economics; it was bound to hit organ building, FHW or no.

 

But I do agree with your main point that we shouldn't automatically look at FWH through rose-tinted specs. The FWH I first learnt on was nice enough, but wholly inadequate for the church it was in.

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Maybe this should be called: "to shot in his own foot".

 

Many french, belgians and germans read this forum.

The germans do the same with their own romantic organs,

while the french praise their Cavaillé-Colls.

Maybe it's not surprising the "neo-romantic" trend of today

deals only with Cavaillé-Coll's style -like Schnitger was the sole

"correct" style 30 years ago-.

And round and round...

 

=========================

 

 

Pierre is absolutely right!

 

For sure, Fr.Willis was extremely good, but interestingly, his first really big project at Liverpool St.George's Hall, was not entirely successful. It improved over time, but Cavaille-Coll didn't like it.

 

St.Mary, Redcliffe is peerless in later, heavy romantic style of Arthur Harrison/Col.Dixon.

 

What I find interesting is this obsession with the Willis/Harrison legacy, as if UK organ-building followed exactly what they did.

 

In point of fact (sticking to tonal rather than engineering qualities), these two organ-builders just happened become the most commercially successful of their day, but that doesn't mean the most successful musically.

 

Personally, I agree with the respondent who finds Bach difficult to deliver on a Fr.Willis organ, and so far as Arthur Harrison is concerned, I soon tire of excessively loud Diapasons and Trombas.

 

If we are to indulge in a little bit of national self-praise, why don't we look back with admiration at the work of T C Lewis?

 

Southwark Cathedral, Ashton-under-Lynne Congregational Church and Kelvingrove (Glasgow) are still there, splendidly restored and an inspiration.

 

However, whilst people ramble on about William Hill (a superb organ-builder), very few ever mention the influence of Thomas Hill or the peerless organ-cases of Arthur Hill. Beverly Minster is good enough, but at Sydney Town Hall, Thomas Hill and his staff created not just a good organ, but an organ which stands alongside the best in the world.

 

Listen to the excellent Mark Quarmby playing Bruckner, listen to the clarity and nobility of the chorus-work, listen to the magnificent reeds, then delight in the wonderful photographs of the organ-case. This was British at its' very best!

 

 

 

http://www.ohta.org.au/Sydney_conf/SYDNEYTOWNHALL.html

 

 

MM

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Yes - I find much to agree with in the most recent posts of MM and Pierre!

 

Having said that, I believe that it is fair to say that the magnificent results which TC lewis produced at Southwark Cathedral fell on deaf ears - largely because it could not (and cannot) be heard effectively in the Nave.

 

I have only ever heard it either from the console or the decani stalls, so I am not totally sure if this is correct. However, it has been quoted so often that I assume there is some real truth in it.

 

I believe that I had stated that I found the playing of JSB on a 'Father' Willis organ difficult - or at least, un-satisfying. Works such as the 'Dorian' Toccata have to be played quitetly in order for Bach's prescribed clavier changes to make sense.

 

Whilst I do take the point Vox Humana made regarding instruments by Schnitger and orchestral crescendi, nevertheless I feel that Pierre makes an equally valid point.

 

I would be interested to hear from any correspondent who can enlighten me as regards mainstream repertoire played on continental European organs - excluding France - I have a fairly good idea what goes on there! For instance, does Joos van der Kooy play Reger and Vierne - or even Franck (!!!) at Sint Bavo? Does the Titulaire of St. Jacobi, Hamburg play Liszt and Widor? (Effectively up one tone, of course!)

 

Any information will be received eagerly - and with gratitude.

 

Incidentally, I have remebered (during my second service, this morning) the actual name of the former architect of St. Paul's, who argued with FHW - it was Somers Clarke - not D. Batigan Verne. My apologies! When I typed the post originally, I was not happy with the name, but could not at the time remember if it was correct!

 

During my first service this morning, I read (whilst twenty-two minutes of self-indulgent waffle emanated from the pulpit) an interesting article from an old back-issue of The Organ, which shed much light on the subject of an exchange of posts between Steve Bournias and Andrew Lucas, on another thread. Later, I will try to put some of that information on here, should anyone wish to read it! Since it emanated from the pen of no-less an authority that Dr. W.L. Sumner, it may safely be presumed that the information was accurate at the time of his writing the article.

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Guest paul@trinitymusic.karoo.co.uk

Yes - I find much to agree with in the most recent posts of MM and Pierre!

 

Having said that, I believe that it is fair to say that the magnificent results which TC lewis produced at Southwark Cathedral fell on deaf ears - largely because it could not (and cannot) be heard effectively in the Nave.

 

 

 

 

Sorry, pcnd, I firmly disagree. You did (wisely) cover your remarks by saying that you hadn't heard the organ other than from the console.

 

Frankly, the only place in the cathedral that you cannot adequately hear the Lewis at Southwark is at the console itself. From the nave everything comes through really well - including the very sweet choir organ which sounds pretty scratchy and clumpy at the console.

 

I really love that organ and I know many others that do too. The reason that it is so rarely recorded or broadcast is not because of any failings on the part of either instrument, staff or building - it is because London Bridge Station is immediately across the road and the nearest viaducts are within about 100 years of the south side of the cathedral. When Walter Hillsman made an LP on the organ in the 70's they had to do it in the middle of the night because of the trains - (or lack of them at that time). I imagine that Peter Wright's (very fine) Barie Cd that he did about ten years ago for Priory was done in a similar fashion.

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Guest Lee Blick
Having said that, I believe that it is fair to say that the magnificent results which TC lewis produced at Southwark Cathedral fell on deaf ears - largely because it could not (and cannot) be heard effectively in the Nave

 

I have heard this organ several times in the nave and I have been disappointed because the instrument sounds buried away.

 

I heard Durufle's Requiem there some years ago and you could hardly hear it against the chorus and orchestra. I was expecting the organ topping the big Eb chord in the Sanctus, but there was almost nothing.

 

I believe that I had stated that I found the playing of JSB on a 'Father' Willis organ difficult - or at least, un-satisfying. Works such as the 'Dorian' Toccata have to be played quitetly in order for Bach's prescribed clavier changes to make sense

 

I was organist in a church with a relatively small 3 manual tracker Father Willis N16051and didn't have too much trouble playing JS Bach on it. I generally kept away from the heavy diapasons.

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The leading organ-builders in Poland seem to be the Zych company, who have a fine web-site with details of some huge instruments constructed in recent years.

 

http://www.zych.com/

Including this one, hot off the press:

http://www.die-orgelseite.de/disp/PL_Lichen_Bazylika.htm

 

Clicking on the photo on the top left of the page will get you some more pics. Looks rather attractive, I must say, even if it is one of those "several organs sprawled around the building" jobs.

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Yes - I find much to agree with in the most recent posts of MM and Pierre!

 

Having said that, I believe that it is fair to say that the magnificent results which TC lewis produced at Southwark Cathedral fell on deaf ears - largely because it could not (and cannot) be heard effectively in the Nave.

Sorry, pcnd, I firmly disagree. You did (wisely) cover your remarks by saying that you hadn't heard the organ other than from the console.

 

Frankly, the only place in the cathedral that you cannot adequately hear the Lewis at Southwark is at the console itself. From the nave everything comes through really well - including the very sweet choir organ which sounds pretty scratchy and clumpy at the console.

 

I really love that organ and I know many others that do too. The reason that it is so rarely recorded or broadcast is not because of any failings on the part of either instrument, staff or building - it is because London Bridge Station is immediately across the road and the nearest viaducts are within about 100 years of the south side of the cathedral. When Walter Hillsman made an LP on the organ in the 70's they had to do it in the middle of the night because of the trains - (or lack of them at that time). I imagine that Peter Wright's (very fine) Barie Cd that he did about ten years ago for Priory was done in a similar fashion.

 

I am pleased to hear that! However, I am puzzled in that case, as to why a number of commentators have made the same point.

 

I really must try to hear it from the nave myself, sometime!

Yes, the Barie CD is excellent; and, I too greatly like the sound of the Southwark organ - at any rate, after its restoration by H&H.

 

I note, with interest, that Lee Blick has heard it in the Nave - and he makes the same point which I do....!

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Including this one, hot off the press:

http://www.die-orgelseite.de/disp/PL_Lichen_Bazylika.htm

 

Clicking on the photo on the top left of the page will get you some more pics. Looks rather attractive, I must say, even if it is one of those "several organs sprawled around the building" jobs.

 

===========================

 

 

Good heavens! That is amazing.

 

MM

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I was organist in a church with a relatively small 3 manual tracker Father Willis  and didn't have too much trouble playing JS Bach on it.  I generally kept away from the heavy diapasons.

 

Mmmm.... I have reviewed the stop-list - I did hear this instrument (from the console) a number of years ago, when a colleague was organist there. I think that I would re-iterate my previous post. Yes, of course, one can play JSB on an organ such as this - but with a degree of compromise. Tierce mixtures really are not any use in Bach - the is, in any case, nothing above a 2p flute on the Swell, so there is no secondary chorus, as such. In addition, whilst one could couple the 8, 4, and 2p Choir flues to the Pedal Organ, if they are true to form, they will not be nearly strong enough.

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Yes - I find much to agree with in the most recent posts of MM and Pierre!

 

Having said that, I believe that it is fair to say that the magnificent results which TC lewis produced at Southwark Cathedral fell on deaf ears - largely because it could not (and cannot) be heard effectively in the Nave.

Sorry, pcnd, I firmly disagree. You did (wisely) cover your remarks by saying that you hadn't heard the organ other than from the console.

 

Frankly, the only place in the cathedral that you cannot adequately hear the Lewis at Southwark is at the console itself. From the nave everything comes through really well - including the very sweet choir organ which sounds pretty scratchy and clumpy at the console.

 

I really love that organ and I know many others that do too. The reason that it is so rarely recorded or broadcast is not because of any failings on the part of either instrument, staff or building - it is because London Bridge Station is immediately across the road and the nearest viaducts are within about 100 years of the south side of the cathedral. When Walter Hillsman made an LP on the organ in the 70's they had to do it in the middle of the night because of the trains - (or lack of them at that time). I imagine that Peter Wright's (very fine) Barie Cd that he did about ten years ago for Priory was done in a similar fashion.

 

 

Notwithstanding the problems of balance, and of delay between departments, this is a beautiful instrument containing some outstanding registers. The 32' Major Violon is stunning - a wonderful register for psalm accompaniment. And the Unda Maris & Vox Angelica ranks on the Solo deserve a mention too.

 

Whilst on the subject of T C Lewis, I'm surprised no-one has mentioned his work (III/36) at St John's Upper Norwood. It pre-dates Southwark by some 15 years, and was restored by H&H in 1999. I was fortunate enough to play this instrument for a recent service, and I was very impressed by the sound. And no problems of balance or time delay either!

 

Graham

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Mmmm.... I have reviewed the stop-list - I did hear this instrument (from the console) a number of years ago, when a colleague was organist there. I think that I would re-iterate my previous post. Yes, of course, one can play JSB on an organ such as this - but with a degree of compromise. Tierce mixtures really are not any use in Bach - the is, in any case, nothing above a 2p flute on the Swell, so there is no secondary chorus, as such. In addition, whilst one could couple the 8, 4, and 2p Choir flues to the Pedal Organ, if they are true to form, they will not be nearly strong enough.

 

It is worth pointing out again that Bach wasn't a very fashionable composer in England (or indeed anywhere else) at the time time Willis was doing his thing.... as late as Beecham, whose opinion of JSB's music is well-known (Far too much counterpoint! And protestant counterpoint at that!), commenting that one couldn't play Bach on a particular organ Bach might well have drawn the question, "Why would you want to do a thing like that?"

 

It is true that a lot of English organs give you the choice of "tubby Bach or skinny Bach", as I think Gordon Reynolds put it. A lot of German organs give you the choice of scratchy, dull Bach or shrill, scrapy Bach, for that matter. Just, it doesn't really do as a criterium for judging an organ. You can't really play Bach on a Cavaillé-Coll or a Walcker or a Sauer or a Silbermann or a Clicquot or even a Schnitger either.

 

This leaves two major questions unanswered:

1) what can you play Bach on then? and

2) do all of Bach's works need the same type of organ?

 

To which two partial answers might be

1) something like a Hildebrandt or Trost and

2) No.

 

Cheers

Barry

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This leaves two major questions unanswered:

1) what can you play Bach on then? and

2) do all of Bach's works need the same type of organ?

 

To which two partial answers might be

1) something like a Hildebrandt or Trost and

2) No.

 

Cheers

Barry

 

Well, we just have a big "Bach's organs" topic on Plenum.

 

We know relatively well the organs Bach played, at least on paper, some

even do still exist today.

Here is one Bach approved after inspection and trial. Krebs too used it:

 

http://www.orgelsite.nl/kerken15/altenburg.htm

 

It has been restored 1973 by Eule Orgelbau.

The stops with an asterisk plus the HPTW's Mixtur are borrowed on the Pedal.

 

Pierre

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http://www.die-orgelseite.de/disp/PL_Lichen_Bazylika.htm

 

Clicking on the photo on the top left of the page will get you some more pics. Looks rather attractive, I must say, even if it is one of those "several organs sprawled around the building" jobs.

 

======================

 

Just a brief over-sight on my part. I believe I mentioned recently the Polish love of big reeds. Note how many Tubas this organ has; three of which are horizontal!

 

MM

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