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Prelude & Fugue in G minor by Dupre.


Christine Jose Rigby
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There's normally a very clear warning that copyright laws differ in different jurisdictions. Annoying, sometimes, but true. Anything published before 1923 in the USA is now public domain in the USA. I don't know if the rules in Canada are the same as those for the USA. The rules in most EU countries are that nothing becomes public domain until 1st of Jan after 70 years after the creator's death (or the death of the last creator to die in the case of collaborations eg opera, songs). But there are traps. French law has an extension to the 70 years for French creators who served in the French forces during times of war amounting to the length of such service. IMSLP generally contains scores that are Public Domain in at least one jurisdiction. You must check what the rules are before downloading anything that might still be protected by copyright law in your jurisdiction.

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Are you sure?

 

I understood that it contained scores which had entered the Public Domain, and were thus out of copyright.

Quite sure! IMSLP has scores which are out of copyright in Canada and the USA, for instance. If you try to download Dupré you will see a notice telling you that the music is still under copyright in the EU.

 

Downloading scores which are still in copyright in this country is as bad as photocopying them.

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The advice given by Innate and Stephen Barber is quite correct.

As someone with vested interests I cannot approve of actions that deprive copyright holders of financial reward, however measly - be it composers, editors or publishers. It will be a sad day when properly printed music is no longer available because internet piracy has made it unviable. OTOH I wholeheartedly approve of IMSLP making available scores that are out of copyright (or, for that matter, scores which publishers have not seen fit to keep in print).

I am ambiguous about YouTube. The sound quality there is such that I would always invest in a "proper" recording if I felt I wanted to listen to a piece regularly, so I regard it more as an advertising platform. However others will argue that even such casual listening is still depriving musicians of income, so I remain open to persuasion.

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Thank you innate, Stephen and Vox for the above.

 

Whilst I do not use it, our choir librarian does. I shall check that he is aware of this. However, since he has been extremely careful not to infringe copyright laws, I doubt that he would have downloaded anything from the IMSLP site which was still in copyright in the UK.

 

My understanding that the site only contained works which had already entered the public domain was based on two points. 1) As stated, I do not use this resource, so I have no idea what is available. 2) Clearly I have been given erroneous information from what I regarded as a trustworthy source.

 

Hmmm.

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There's normally a very clear warning that copyright laws differ in different jurisdictions. Annoying, sometimes, but true. Anything published before 1923 in the USA is now public domain in the USA. I don't know if the rules in Canada are the same as those for the USA. The rules in most EU countries are that nothing becomes public domain until 1st of Jan after 70 years after the creator's death (or the death of the last creator to die in the case of collaborations eg opera, songs). But there are traps. French law has an extension to the 70 years for French creators who served in the French forces during times of war amounting to the length of such service. IMSLP generally contains scores that are Public Domain in at least one jurisdiction. You must check what the rules are before downloading anything that might still be protected by copyright law in your jurisdiction.

In Canada, copyright extends until 50 years after the creator's death.

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