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Do You Have A Musical Ear?


madorganist
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There's a Murphy's Law of typographical errors, which states that the number of errors found is proportional to the number of copies you have just had printed, whilst the time it takes to find them is inversely proportional to the same quantity.

 

And who has not had to pulp thousands of copies of the 32-page Annual Report cum Notice of the Annual General Meeting because they didn't change the date from last year's meeting? I know I have.

 

Another rule of thumb is that, whilst the proof-reader will check the spelling, the punctuation, the style and the sense of all the small print, they will fail to notice the lower case z that has somehow crept into the document's title, which appears in 24 point bold on the cover page.

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And who has not had to pulp thousands of copies of the 32-page Annual Report cum Notice of the Annual General Meeting because they didn't change the date from last year's meeting?  I know I have.

 

 

:) Oh, so true. I did a presentation a couple of months ago of a "Daft" Document. Somehow the R had gone astray...

 

Reminds of the letter I received from Staffordshire County Council - because my postal address at the time was Keele University Chapel, I frequently got "promoted" to the status of vicar by correspondents. This particular letter, though, was addressed:

 

Dear Revered Taylor,

 

I had no idea I was held in such high regard!

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  • 3 weeks later...
Oh yes, I completely agree.

 

I've just come back from teaching a bunch of Swedes about troubleshooting and problem solving, and, obviously, one of the key points to get across is that if you don't get the "problem statement" (i.e. What is wrong with what?) clear, then you're wasting your time.

 

But, for the Swedes, "Network problem" seems to fit with the "What is wrong with what?" question - in their mind, the Wrong with bit = Network, and the thing that's wrong with it is that it has a problem. What kind of problem? Oh, just a problem. Circular argument starts. And rages for several minutes, ending with the Swedish guy saying "Yeah, but I know what I mean".

 

Grr.

 

The whole point of writing something down is to communicate something to someone else, surely? If only the person "what wrote it" :) knows what it means, then it's rather pointless!

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A friend of mine directed me to have a look at this musical listening test devised by the University of Newcastle

 

http://www.delosis.com/listening/measure.html

 

I'm off to the doctors to have my ears syringed -I only scored 24!

 

========================

 

I did the test....26.

 

The trouble is, I was mentally harmonising the tunes the second-time around and working out ways of improvising on them.

 

I was also drinking tea and my headphones slipped off when the cat started pawing at my face, wanting to go out in the snow. Other than that, the test went without a hitch.

 

Why don't they do music-degrees like this?

 

All that harmony & counterpoint is just humbug, isn't it?

 

I bet they would be confused by something else however, because I can listen to Radio 2 and write classical music down at the same time; at least after a fashion. It just doesn't affect me.

 

Weird!

 

:)

 

MM

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