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Pierre Lauwers

20 Stops On Two Manuals

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There are some interesting points.

 

I like the scheme in general.

 

I would also prefer the GO mixture to be a quint mixture - the tierce mixture is out of character with the rest of the GO. Ideally, commencing at 22-26-29.

 

Personally, I would substitute a nice Gamba for the 1 1/3p on the GO - I would just find it more useful. I have a Larigot, but it is one stop which I rarely use.

 

I also agree with Colin regarding the 16p reed on the Swell. Accompanimentally, I find an 8p Hautboy invaluable.

 

I would also separate the Swell Strings, in order that I could have a proper 8p Open Diapason - and still have a Salicional and a Vox Angelica.

 

Only one other thought - a Pedal Ophicleide might be a little heavy - why not a Trombone?

 

Otherwise, I quite liked the scheme.

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Guest Lee Blick

I would like to have seperate ranks too, but I had to make a sacrifice somewhere because of the 20s 2m constraints. I suppose you could have a half draw on the salicional/dulcianna adding the voix celeste on the full draw

 

I have a quint 1 1/3 on the Great of my organ and I like it to add something bright before adding the mixture and nice as a mutation within a solo sound. I take your point about the Great mixture, but I quite like the 'bite', maybe out of keeping for Bach but useful in full combinations for French organ music

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A Larigot isn't a Quint, it belongs to the Flute family not

the Diapason chorus.

So maybe we talk of different things.

The tierce in the french music is rather to be find in Cornets

or "jeu de tierce"; in the Mixtures, in german or english music.

Of course a 17-19-22 can be an alternative to the Cornet

in the Tutti.

Pierre

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A Larigot isn't a Quint, it belongs to the Flute family not

the Diapason chorus.

So maybe we talk of different things.

 

I know, Pierre!

 

I did not check the name of it - I just looked at the pitch. I would not want either on a GO of this size - just a nice Gamba!

 

Incidentally, the mixture would not do for French Romantic Music - C-C generally supplied quint mixtures, apart from cornets - but I think that we have already debated this point.

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Greetings,

 

Just add a Septieme rank to that Mixture and you'll get a nice crunchy sound! There is a Fisk organ around here that has a "Septierce" Mixture II-III 17-19 with 21 from T.C. up I believe. The resulting sound is nice and gritty - almost one that you are ashamed to use in Church! :)

 

Best,

 

Nathan

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Greetings,

 

There is a Skinner instrument here in Hartford which has a Great Mixture containing a 1 3/5' rank. I wouldn't call it a Dolce Cornet, but rather the full-powered version of the same composition.

 

This is a three-rank Mixture with the composition 1 3/5', 1 1/3', 1'. The Mixture breaks back an entire octave at Treble D#.

 

Best,

 

Nathan

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Greetings,

 

    There is a Skinner instrument here in Hartford which has a Great Mixture containing a 1 3/5' rank.  I wouldn't call it a Dolce Cornet, but rather the full-powered version of the same composition.

 

    This is a three-rank Mixture with the composition 1 3/5', 1 1/3', 1'.  The Mixture breaks back an entire octave at Treble D#.

 

    Best,

 

              Nathan

 

Quite normal in a romantic organ; it's the Cavaillé-Coll Mixture that is not.

It seems later Skinner built Quint Mixtures, rather after Lewis example.

But then we are already in the "Post-romantic" period.

Pierre

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