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father-willis

Music for Inductions

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Dear all,

 

Following on from the Credo settings I wonder if m'learned friends out there have any suggestions for music for an Induction service? We have a new team rector coming at the end of January. Suggestions for organ music, but more especially choral, would be welcome. It may be that we have to have choir members from the other churches and therefore will limit our contribution but for now any suggestions are welcome!

 

Happy New Year to all!

 

F-W

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What an open question!

 

If you've got the resources, push the boat out with something like Parry's 'I was glad', which seems eminently suitable. A good chance to show an incoming priest what a choir can do.

 

In terms of organ music, I'd always plump for loud and French, but that's just my taste! I recall a discussion on here some time ago offered two slightly mischievous options of the 'War March of the Priests' and Widor's 'Marche Pontificale'.

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I once asked about voluntaries for a similar occasion and received loads of helpful suggestions:
http://mander-organs-forum.invisionzone.com/index.php?/topic/2936-voluntary-for-induction-of-new-priest/

(Those in the know can join me in a little chuckle over how this all ended up.)

If the choral music has to be kept simple there's always Attwood's "Come Holy Ghost". Not very exciting, I know, but it's harmless and does the job well enough.

 

If the singers are fully competent and there's scope for something more complex then, if the churchmanship and ambience would be sympathetic, Willaert's Veni Sancte spiritus could be worth considering.

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Regarding organ music, how about Bossi's 'Entree Pontificale' for the entry of the clergy? I believe 'pontifical' refers to functions performed by bishops, not necessarily being restricted to those connected solely with the papacy. This might pacify those whose churchmanship might otherwise be offended by the title. Of course, it assumes a bishop will be present, but even if s/he isn't, it's still a great piece and not particularly difficult (important in my case if not in yours). If you use it, maybe try to persuade them to wait at the east end or wherever until the end rather than truncating it arbitrarily - it's about 4 minutes long.

 

I have it in Mayhew's 'The Organist's Collection' volume 6, but of course (as with so much of their output, sadly), there's little to guide the player other than the vaguest dynamic indications.

 

If you want to hear a really rousing rendition of it, Colin Walsh played it at Salisbury ('Anthems from Salisbury Cathedral Choir', Meridian CDE84025 - this might still be available from the cathedral shop).

 

As for choral music, maybe 'Hear my Prayer' (Mendelssohn) - not necessarily all of it (!) - or 'How Lovely is Thy Dwelling Place' (Brahms) - if you've still got time to train up the choir and have a reasonable soloist or two?

 

CEP

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For the choir, Locus Iste, or if you have a sense of humour, Elgar's Ecce Sacerdos Magnus. recessional : War march of the priests :D

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For the choir, Locus Iste, or if you have a sense of humour, Elgar's Ecce Sacerdos Magnus. recessional : War march of the priests :D

 

I'm sorry but I don't think this is an appropriate suggestion - or, perhaps, I'm just lacking a sense of humour tonight!

 

I'm not sure why Ecce Sacerdos Magnus should be humorous! Liturgically, it would normally sung at the entrance of the Bishop - who will preside at the event - either to plainsong or, possibly to the Elgar setting.

 

............. and I can think of, at least, four settings of Locus Iste - which is the Gradual of the Mass for the Dedication of a Church and refers to the House of God rather than to the person of the priest. I presume you are thinking of Bruckner - which is a lot harder than it looks!!

 

'War March of the Priests' - great fun but I suppose it depends on how well you know your new Team Rector and whether he has a sense of humour. Personally I'd go for something else that was 'loud and splashy' at the end - just in case it was misunderstood!

 

I notice that, in several Dioceses of the Church of England reference is made to the order of Service being approved by the Bishop well in advance. The arrangements of the service are the responsibility of the Area Dean, and should sorted "not later than two weeks before the service". There are quite a few useful websites for the Induction of New Clergy which might be worth looking at - even at this late stage.

 

Hope it all goes well for you.

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Thanks to all for the suggestions. I still haven't seen anything concerning the service (which is on Jan 22nd!) but I have learned (3rd hand) that there will be no anthem; just hymns - six of them! Christ triumphant, ever reigning - Great

The Lord's my shepherd I'll not want - Not sure I know it
(Stuart Townend setting)
Be thou my vision - Oh dear, not again!
O thou who camest from above - Great
I The Lord of sea and sky - Oh no!
Let us build a house where love can dwell - What?

 

I don't suppose anyone has an outragious version of 'I the Lord of sea and sky'? We don't have it often, it's not that kind of place. But when we do I'm afraid it's orchestral reeds, nothing above 4' and all the tremulants with chords of added anythings galore! Some love it, the choir think it's hilarious!

And what is the last one...?? Anyone have a copy they wouldn't mind scanning please?

 

F-W

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Anything is forgiveable with Hereford in there! Guiting Power is good as well - if there's no anthem you can go descant crazy with the choir and John Barnard's isn't straightforward but well worth the effort.

 

The Townend is passable enough, has a refrain with a dead easy descant over the top.

 

I think there's a Malcolm Archer arrangement of Sea and Sky, not sure if its available. My colleague has written a descant which is quite effective with some phrases over the inter-verse bits which are too much for my taste - I could ask if she's happy for a copy to go your way.

 

Let us build a house isn't too bad as they go, it benefits from a bit of reharmonisation in places. Its in Hymns Old & New (at least the version we have) and in the new A&M.

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I don't suppose anyone has an outragious version of 'I the Lord of sea and sky'? We don't have it often, it's not that kind of place. But when we do I'm afraid it's orchestral reeds, nothing above 4' and all the tremulants with chords of added anythings galore! Some love it, the choir think it's hilarious!

 

F-W

I have a descant/reharmonization I can send you if you want (PM your email to me). Not outrageous but fairly extensively reharmonized.

 

Stephen Barber

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The Lord's my shepherd I'll not want - Not sure I know it

(Stuart Townend setting)

 

The tune is OK if you don't mind maudlin saccharine. I do.

 

... it's not that kind of place.

 

I'll lay odds it soon will be.

The weather's dismal here. Apologies if it shows.

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I'll lay odds it soon will be.

 

 

Well, if it is, there will be far fewer people attending and before that happens there will alomost certainly be a battle or two from members of the congregation, choir and, not least, the D of Mus! We are probably the only church in the area to offer a mass setting and motet, with a fully choral evensing every week!

 

F-W

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Well, if it is, there will be far fewer people attending and before that happens there will alomost certainly be a battle or two from members of the congregation, choir and, not least, the D of Mus!

 

 

 

Post Deleted - by Dr. SL

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Well, if it is, there will be far fewer people attending and before that happens there will alomost certainly be a battle or two from members of the congregation, choir and, not least, the D of Mus! We are probably the only church in the area to offer a mass setting and motet, with a fully choral evensing every week!

 

F-W

 

I hope you are correct. Long live churches like yours. Please do let us know how things develop.

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I am now intrigued as to the identity of someone describing himself as Father Willis who has a church in Gloucestershire which offers a full mass setting with motet and choral evensong every week. If it where I think it is, the organ was just a three-manual when I knew it, but is so no longer - but I'm probably way off the mark and it doesn't matter anyway!

 

Canada is somewhat bigger than Gloucestershire, but there are only four churches offering a fully choral eucharist and choral evensong every Sunday: Montreal Cathedral, Toronto Cathedral, St. Thomas's, Toronto (rich)....and us. We might be the only one of the four to use the Book of Common Prayer.

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... a church in Gloucestershire which offers a full mass setting with motet and choral evensong every week. If it where I think it is, the organ was just a three-manual when I knew it, but is so no longer

 

My father was a chorister there 100 years ago! (He couldn't read music though.)

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For me, there is one piece that makes more sense than any other- but merely a personal point of view. Elgar's "The Spirit of the Lord" is sublime, not overly difficult (except for the poor organist) and a superb performance is here:

 

The score is available here for free: http://www1.cpdl.org/wiki/images/0/02/Elgar-The_Spirit_Of_The_Lord_Is_Upon_Me.pdf

 

And here is the text:

The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because He hath anointed me to preach the Gospel to the poor: He hath sent me to heal the broken-hearted to preach deliverance to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind – to preach the acceptable year of the Lord; to give unto them that mourn a garland for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness; that they might be called the trees of righteousness, the planting of the Lord, that He might be glorified. For as the earth bringeth forth her bud, and as the garden that causeth the things that are sown in it to spring forth; so the Lord God will cause righteousness and praise to spring forth before all the nations. The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because He hath anointed me to preach the Gospel.

Isaiah 61:1-3,11

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I am now intrigued as to the identity of someone describing himself as Father Willis who has a church in Gloucestershire which offers a full mass setting with motet and choral evensong every week. If it where I think it is, the organ was just a three-manual when I knew it, but is so no longer - but I'm probably way off the mark and it doesn't matter anyway!

 

Canada is somewhat bigger than Gloucestershire, but there are only four churches offering a fully choral eucharist and choral evensong every Sunday: Montreal Cathedral, Toronto Cathedral, St. Thomas's, Toronto (rich)....and us. We might be the only one of the four to use the Book of Common Prayer.

Ha! Wonderful to be intriguing. It's no secret, in fact it's far better more people know so that they can come along (although Canada is a little far away). All Saints', Cheltenham. Where Gustav Holst was Baptised and grew up, wrote some very early organ pieces, and his father, Adolphe von Holst was married and was first organist. Anyone is very welcome to join us or visit the very fine Grade I church (John Middleton) and play the organ.

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My father was a chorister there 100 years ago! (He couldn't read music though.)

 

That's fascinating. Do tell more; PM me if you'd like!

 

Sorry, false alarm. I assumed we were talking about Cirencester Parish Church.

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Ah! I was guessing Cirencester because it's a Father Willis, but All SS Cheltenham was my next guess. Has it still got a Euphonium?

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Ah! I was guessing Cirencester because it's a Father Willis, but All SS Cheltenham was my next guess. Has it still got a Euphonium?

Ummmmm....ah....well.....yes...no...maybe...!

The Euphonium was added in 1901 as something to back-up the great and be a reed for that division (originally the Tuba Mirabilis was on 8" wind and was supposed to be the final addition to full organ - it wasn't a fog-horn! and has always been enclosed). The Euph. pipes are high up in the chamber behind the wall on the other side of which the great organ is placed. The pipes are noted in the shop book to be of thick plain metal. They are on the same pressure as the tuba (raised to 10" c.1921) and are the same scale with harmonic trebles. It was called Euphonium from the outset but the pipes are marked 'Horn' and since the '50s rebuild have been called Tromba, but it really is nothing like a tromba, thank goodness! How much, if any, revoicing has been done is unknown but it does have a perculiar sonority.

 

An article was written in the 1940s by the, then, assistant organist, Herbert Byard mentioning that this stop was somewhat unusual, clear and not cloying with large chords being very clear when played he likened it to aHarrison small tuba/tromba....I think! I'll see if there's anything else about it.

 

Does anyone know of any other Euphonia?

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