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New organ for Cambridge


AJJ

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Why is the quintfluit described as 3' when the hazard is 2 2/3? Is there a difference, if so, what interval does a 3' stop produce above the equivalent 8' ?

 

I struggle to see the point of the salicional.

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It looks a bit bloated on the Great compared with the Swell, if they're intending to accompany a choir with it. The Salcional would warm up the Roerfluit nicely, but I think a bit more reed tone in the Swell is more useful than the quint and cornet on the Great.

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With new (and fairly substantial) two-manual instruments still being built with (in my view) the very limiting provision of Open Diapason and Stopped Diapason as the only Great unison flues I would personally be glad of a Salicional-type stop as a third 8ft register. I'm sure that the stop as proposed here will prove its worth, both on its own terms and as an effective colouring timbre to the companion 8fts - not to mention some less orthodox combinations I'm sure....

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With new (and fairly substantial) two-manual instruments still being built with (in my view) the very limiting provision of Open Diapason and Stopped Diapason as the only Great unison flues I would personally be glad of a Salicional-type stop as a third 8ft register. I'm sure that the stop as proposed here will prove its worth, both on its own terms and as an effective colouring timbre to the companion 8fts - not to mention some less orthodox combinations I'm sure....

 

Indeed. it will be interesting to see how it works as an accompanimental instrument.I would also agree with David Drinkell that it needs a greater choice of reed-tone in the Swell.

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Yes, it was odd, the revamped version as well as the original. I wouldn't call the Flentrop exactly normal - it emphasises certain aspects to the exclusion of others and therefore looks odd itself.

 

From the look of it, the most exciting and interesting modern organ in Cambridge seems to be the St-Martin at Girton - 26 stops spread over four manuals. With a spot of imagination, this could be a truly inspirational beast for many types of repertoire.

 

But I guess it's pretty odd, too!

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In terms of assessing what the priorities are when compiling a stoplist for a new two-manual instrument with 20+ stops, the proposed H&H scheme for St. Andrew's Bedford makes quite a comparison with the Flentrop under discussion here. The appeal leaflet for that instrument is available on line.

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The H&H Edington Priory organ is also a well thought out 2 manual design - the Mander for St Mary's Merton looks to be likewise. 8' variety and decent choruses on manuals, reeds and flute combinations that work well as soloists or in chorus, a decent swell box and something more than just a lone pedal 16' can cope with a surprising ammount of repertoire and service music. And if it is all on a nice mechanical action one could almost be talking about the 'village' type instruments I play most sundays!

 

A

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A Swell suboctave coupler could partially get around the lack of 16 foot tone, and would be fairly standard on romantic French organs. But would it work on an instrument such as this - and if not, and space or budget only allowed for one reed, what would be the most suitable reed I wonder?

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.............and if not, and space or budget only allowed for one reed, what would be the most suitable reed I wonder?

I'd suggest a fairly bright and open toned Oboe - combined with other stops on the Swell it could be 'coloured' or not as desired for solo work and would give quite an effective full chorus with or without the Mixture.

 

A

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I'd go for a trumpet. With a good box, it would fulfil most of the functions required of a Swell reed. The Cormorne could go on the Great, where it could be a reasonable chorus reed as well as a solo.

 

The problem, as I see it, with many recent schemes which lack anything more than an oboe in the Swell, is that you lose most of the potential for bringing a fair amount of Swell through a good bit of Great by opening the box - an effect which is worth having in many types of music.

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I'd go for a trumpet. With a good box, it would fulfil most of the functions required of a Swell reed. The Cormorne could go on the Great, where it could be a reasonable chorus reed as well as a solo.The problem, as I see it, with many recent schemes which lack anything more than an oboe in the Swell, is that you lose most of the potential for bringing a fair amount of Swell through a good bit of Great by opening the box - an effect which is worth having in many types of music.

Ideally of course an Oboe and a Trumpet/Cornopean on the Swell with Trumpet and Cromorne/Clarinet on the Great.

 

A

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Although continental builders have tried a few Tubas in recent years, and (as a senior British organ builder remarked) had been "aching to have a go at a really big diapason", I don't recall any of them producing a Cornopean yet. I'm probably wrong and wait to be corrected!

 

The effect I mentioned of the Swell coming through the Great is helped, of course, by the Swell Mixture being at least one pitch higher than that on the Great and this is useful in other ways also. I don't see much point in a Swell Mixture that is more grave than its partner on the Great, unless there's an octave coupler.

 

Another point which really does mess up the accompanimental potential of many instruments is the provision of a flute as the Swell 2'. This deprives the player of a bit of useful sparkle at a dynamic level which is needed very often. It also means that the mixture comes on with a crash and/or stands away from its support. The Swell 2' needs to be a principal, or at least a bright gemshorn or flageolet. Of course, a lot of this is dependent on the voicing, but the 2' flutes found so often (especially on continental organs) fail to inspire me.

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An interesting new two manual scheme (ableit larger than being discussed here) with a Cornopean. The partial enclosure of the Great seems to link back to Skinner etc. maybe?

 

http://www.cbfisk.com/sites/default/files/instruments/specifications/145_spec.pdf

 

A

 

A clarinet on the Great with a 2 2/3 and 1 3/5 on the Swell - interesting. Sometimes I've seen both clarinet and cornet on the same manual, which seems a bit pointless at least for French baroque music.

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An interesting new two manual scheme (ableit larger than being discussed here) with a Cornopean. The partial enclosure of the Great seems to link back to Skinner etc. maybe?

 

http://www.cbfisk.com/sites/default/files/instruments/specifications/145_spec.pdf

 

A

Now, that's an interesting one (or it will be when they get it all in). I'm not sure that partial enclosure on the Great is worth the hassle, although I'm not averse to total enclosure. The Casavant at Memorial University here has a similar set-up and it's more of a nuisance than a blessing. Of course, if they had electric action and pitman chests, they could get a nice Choir Organ out of that lot by duplexing....

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Another couple of interesting solutions - one big and one small. Does anyone have experience of this 'either/or' method of stop control?

 

http://www.grenzing.com/organosshow.cfm?id=211&ip=211211

 

http://www.noackorgan.com/instruments/?opus=161

 

PS The Noack site currently explains the stop control selection in this latter instrument in its 'news' section.

 

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Not sure about this one but I for one did not find the 1975 H&H that in place there before it a very pleasant instrument to listen to - there seems to have been a relatively quick succession of instruments there.

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  • 1 year later...

I played in the first inauguration event yesterday - David Titterington (consultant) is playing the opening public recital this evening and I'll be playing a concert in the first series next year. It's very fine indeed. A varied and colourful specification, beautifully scaled for the chapel, and a subtle and responsive action too. A lot of organ has been fitted into a very modest space ad the demands of accompaniment haven't been overlooked - it made a lovely job of Parry's Hear my Words sung the by the excellent chapel choir. Plans are in progress for regular recitals in the next 12-18 months so there will be plenty of chances to hear it. And I'd be surprised if a recording doesn't happen once the instrument has settled in a bit.

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