Jump to content
Mander Organ Builders Forum

William Hill Revisited?


MusingMuso
 Share

Recommended Posts

I came across an organ which immediately interested me to-day, not least because it is a new cathedral-organ.

 

The specification almost harks back to mid-19th century English design and the work of Wm.Hill, but the similarity goes deeper.

 

The organ of Consenze Cathedral, built by Mascioni of Italy, is a rather good sound. When I heard the sound samples (always a dangerous way to judge an organ), I couldn't help but be reminded of two other organs....St.Bavo and Sydney Town Hall, which although quite different in the detail, share certain similarities in the tonal effect within their respective buidings.

 

It is fascinating also, that were the either the Recit (Swell) or Positif mutations removed (biut not both) this organ would almost exactly fall into the 40 speaking-stop category discussed elsewhere on the board.

 

Lots of other organs are featured on the Mascioni web-site, including the new organ of Tokyo Cathedral; a building with razor-sharp architecture and a splendid acoustic.

 

I'd be interested to know what Pierre Lauwers thinks of this instrument, because it has many romantic elements contained within, yet a clarity which should be ideal for the contrapuntal baroque tradition.

 

Do note the enormous height of the Mascioni erection-hall as you browse the site.

 

This organ certainly has a personality all its'own.

 

Here is the URL:-

 

http://www.mascioni-organs.com/

 

MM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes I know Mascioni, MM.

 

As Mr Mander once said, there are links between british and italian

organs.

Moreover, the classic italian organ is one of the two pillars upon which

the romantic organ arose, in the course of a process that started

around 1700.

Hear this Principale -a perfect Open Diapason II or III!

 

http://www.mascioni-organs.com/download/mp3/to8.mp3

 

Best wishes,

Pierre

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also...Ruffatti are building something vaguely 'English Cathedral' for Uppsala Cathedral in Sweden - the 'Westminster Abbey' of over there by all accounts. The acoustic is amazing - I sang there once on tour as a treble. There is a big 3man in the west gallery (Swedish built - 19th century but sounding very French) the Ruffatti will be on a new gallery in the crossing - 4man, Tuba, chamades and 32 reed etc. The organist, Andrew Canning is British.

 

AJJ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...
Guest delvin146
I came across an organ which immediately interested me to-day, not least because it is a new cathedral-organ.

 

The specification almost harks back to mid-19th century English design and the work of Wm.Hill, but the similarity goes deeper.

 

The organ of Consenze Cathedral, built by Mascioni of Italy, is a rather good sound. When I heard the sound samples (always a dangerous way to judge an organ), I couldn't help but be reminded of two other organs....St.Bavo and Sydney Town Hall, which although quite different in the detail, share certain similarities in the tonal effect within their respective buidings.

 

It is fascinating also, that were the either the Recit (Swell)  or Positif mutations removed (biut not both) this organ would almost exactly fall into the 40 speaking-stop category discussed elsewhere on the board.

 

Lots of other organs are featured on the Mascioni web-site, including the new organ of Tokyo Cathedral; a building with razor-sharp architecture and a splendid acoustic.

 

I'd be interested to know what Pierre Lauwers thinks of this instrument, because it has many romantic elements contained within, yet a clarity which should be ideal for the contrapuntal baroque tradition.

 

Do note the enormous height of the Mascioni erection-hall as you browse the site.

 

This organ certainly has a personality all its'own.

 

Here is the URL:-

 

http://www.mascioni-organs.com/

 

MM

 

Wouldn't you say that the Mascioni of Tokyo cathedral sounded like more of a Rushworth than a Hill?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...