Jump to content
Mander Organs
Sign in to follow this  
OrganistOnTheHill

Easy Fanfares?

Recommended Posts

Yet again you’ve requested information/assistance. This is an excellent forum for this. 

But, and with the best will in the world, I believe it would be good, before I and others spend (in some cases, considerable) time and effort thinking about and answering questions you have posed, if you were to acknowledge and respond to questions asked of you in another thread you began.

I recall several volumes with similar titles to that heading this thread, which include some outstanding pieces. Francis Jackson's Archbishop's Fanfare is one of these - but does require a substantial (solo) reed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was learning the organ my teacher was the best source of information about repertoire and tips on technique. He knew where I was in my studies, what I would be able to accomplish at that stage in my career, and be able to suggest new music that would push me without it being too difficult at that point and thus discourage me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, John Furse said:

Yet again you’ve requested information/assistance. This is an excellent forum for this. 

But, and with the best will in the world, I believe it would be good, before I and others spend (in some cases, considerable) time and effort thinking about and answering questions you have posed, if you were to acknowledge and respond to questions asked of you in another thread you began.

The same thought has already occurred to me.  Could you perhaps get the advice you are seeking in a more direct manner from the music department at your school and/or a personal teacher?  Of course, you might already be doing this, and it's not really my business anyway.   There is obviously no harm, and potentially everything to gain, from augmenting it with material you get from the members here, but I would be a little worried if this forum was the only source of the help you are requesting.  This concern which I have is the only reason for posting this.

CEP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am currently working on a graded examination for organ and my teacher wishes me to focus on the exam repertoire but I am a believer of trying new music! I do apologise that I create threads and don't reply afterwards to signify my presence. The main reason for that is because I create threads to gain more information about a subject of interest and the thread seems to spiral outwards to other areas where my knowledge is limited to comment/reply about.

I have a flair for grand organ fanfares which I believe that shows the capability and colours on offer of a palette of the organ. I did discover a 'Fanfare for John Bradley' by Francis Jackson of York Minster, which I have been learning by myself and wish to learn more of these greater fanfares.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try Leighton's Fanfare. It's a very effective, easy piece and I don't think it's often played (probably because it was published in the OUP book, "Easy Modern Organ Music". I think it's also in the Leighton Organ Music Book (OUP).

There's a good one by Bliss: "A Wedding Fanfare".

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree - Leighton most worthwhile, and all three of the Bliss fanfares (published by Novello) are very straightforward and effective. (Find a recording of them by Christopher Dearnley - dating from early 70s prior to the 72-77 rebuild - on itunes or whatever.) (OK - here is the first of them in which you get to hear the famous 1930 Trompette Militaire in the North East quarter gallery of the Dome. An outstandingly fabulous stop you must make it your business to hear in the flesh asap!) And the Mathias Fanfare is also very good news - published by OUP in The Oxford Book of Wedding Music - a valuable album full of useful pieces.

An album I have always found useful, published by Novello is Fanfares and Processionals. All useful and approachable pieces - especially Fanfare in D by Arthur Willis. You can find it on You tube played by Christopher Herrick on St Paul's organ in about 1968. (Here it is!) Not over difficult at all. You might get some of these second hand. Beware of shark-ish prices on Ebay.

A very reasonable source of some second hand music is a gentleman called Adrian Self who has his own music publishing company called Animus. Type Animus Music into Google and explore his site. He has a tab on his homepage for second hand music as most sensible and encouraging prices, though, sadly, not the volumes I refer to. What he HAS got and which you ought to snap up, is Four Extemporisations by Percy Whitlock, the last of which is called Fanfare. This is a big piece needing a large organ with a Tuba - I suspect you have this at your disposal! It's not as easy/straightforward as the other pieces one or two of us have recommended but you will want to play it one day. It pairs very nicely with No 3 of the 4 - Fidelis - a classic Whitlock piece of immense charm for softer stops. 

My advice given a little while ago still holds - get involved with things like the Oundle courses so you can swap ideas with other young aspiring organists. Meanwhile, well done on starting some really excellent threads that have drawn a great deal of interest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh... and... if you were to look at publications by Kevin Mayhew, there are several really excellent short fanfares by June Nixon - anything by her is excellent in my experience - but they are rather spread through the various volumes so it gets expensive unless you can find any second hand. I haven't the titles immediately to hand this moment, but I could look them up if you are interested. They are all about Grade VI-VII pianistically with not too much pedal and they are two sides of music - at least, the ones I'm thinking of are. Also published by Kevin Mayhew are some short fanfare like pieces by Noel Rawsthorne. And then there is this - Trinity Fanfare,composed and played by Ian Tracey, on a digital organ. One side of A4 - published Church Organ World - see here. This is very straightforward and almost as much as anything it might encourage you to write a few of your own. One day, you'll be able to write things like this, from the Cathedral of St John the Divine in New York.  They have this massive en chamade State Trumpet on the west wall below a rose window. Again, a visit in person is well worth the effort. See here. They demonstrate the organ every Monday at 1.00pm and they take you into the loft.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 23/06/2018 at 10:16, Martin Cooke said:

 One day, you'll be able to write things like this, from the Cathedral of St John the Divine in New York.  They have this massive en chamade State Trumpet on the west wall below a rose window.

Thanks.  Certainly an impressive sound.

If it is of any interest, I found this:

which is the same performance, obviously filmed by someone in a more favourable positions (plus a bit extra at the beginning) which benefits from avoiding most of the annoying 'audience noise' where people can't shut up and just listen!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

St. John the Divine  is so big that the west end State Trumpet is said to be in a different postal district from the rest of the instrument.  The organ as a whole is a fabulous instrument, it would certainly come into my top ten, although by American standards and in relation to the size of the building, it isn't that big - about 120 speaking stops.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, John Robinson said:

which is the same performance,

It doesn't matter, but actually it's a different performance from a different Easter - same stop, though!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Martin Cooke said:

It doesn't matter, but actually it's a different performance from a different Easter - same stop, though!

Is it?  I had no idea!  I assumed that it must be the same time and place, just a different viewpoint.  Apologies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...