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Music To Avoid Treading In

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=========================

No,no,no!

 

I ADORE Reger's music....I've travelled under severe hardships to hear it, like Bach went to Lubeck.

 

Meine Gott! 

 

Imagine....Car to Yeadon in the wee-small hours, wait for an hour in the bar/restaurant,  plane to Amsterdam Schipol, (breakfast), get frisked by Dutch security  ;)  , catch a train which fails to stop untl it gets to Leiden, back up the track, change trains, go to Haarlem, walk to either Bavo no.1 or Bavo no.2,  real ice-cream in a cone.....REGER (swoon)....another ice-cream in a cone....eat terrible Dutch sandwich, walk to station, catch train, end up in Eindhoven after falling asleep, back to Schipol, fight my way through customs and check-in, hum Reger themes as I sit among awful, sleazy, pleasure-seekers retuning home (the few Dutch on board assume that I am some crazed Lutheran missionary who knows something about jet-engines and metal fatigue) , fight my way out of Yeadon Airport, get frisked by Asian security  :huh:  ,  retrieve car from car-park (paying £20 for the privilege    :( )....drive home, stroke/feed the cat, go to sleep happy.

 

I just don't have Bach's talent, that's the difference!

 

:(

 

MM

 

MM

 

Oh, thank God, MM!

 

I do not think that I could face the idea of such a complicated journey in such a short time, but I am impressed with your dedication!

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Thanks, I don't know these pieces at all. Any idea who publishes them?

 

Langlais - Vingt-Quatre Pieces pour Orgue ou Harmonium (2 Vols) - Editions Combre (24 Boulevarde Poissonniere, 75009, Paris) - I got them via Allegro Music. There is also a set by Andre Fleury which are good too - I try all these sorts of things for a bit of variety on my little one manual Vowles. Too much C H Trevor can go a long way!

 

AJJ

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Langlais - Vingt-Quatre Pieces pour Orgue ou Harmonium (2 Vols) - Editions Combre (24 Boulevarde Poissonniere, 75009, Paris) - I got them via Allegro Music. There is also a set by Andre Fleury which are good too - I try all these sorts of things for a bit of variety on my little one manual Vowles. Too much C H Trevor can go a long way!

 

AJJ

There's a similar volume called Expressions - published by FitzSimons - half of the pieces are Hakim and half are Langlais. A bit more involved than the 24 pieces though.

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Pieces that would keep me away from a recital would include:

 

Elgar's Vesper Voluntaries. It is definitely a mistake to play the whole lot in a single recital - I know because I sat through them once. Fortunately there was a beautiful building to look at to relieve the utter boredom.

 

William Bolcom's Gospel Preludes (or whatever they are called). I had forgotten about these (mercifully) but a mention by another poster caused me to reach for the air freshener.

 

Wagner overtures arranged for organ (in fact, almost any transcriptions of orchestral music).

 

Whitlock's Organ Sonata, which seems to ramble endlessly.

 

I find Reger doesn't engage me at all, but I wouldn't actively avoid his music.

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William Bolcom's Gospel Preludes (or whatever they are called).  I had forgotten about these (mercifully) but a mention by another poster caused me to reach for the air freshener.

 

:huh:

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Far too much time on my hands today - at home recovering from flu!

 

At the risk of being branded a heretic, how about Wachet auf BWV645? As a listener, but especially as a player. It really doesn't fit the organ well, and to my mind is the least successful of the Schubler Chorales..........

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Far too much time on my hands today - at home recovering from flu!

 

At the risk of being branded a heretic, how about Wachet auf BWV645? As a listener, but especially as a player. It really doesn't fit the organ well, and to my mind is the least successful of the Schubler Chorales..........

 

Sorry - I cannot see how it does not fit the organ well. I find it very comfortable - even in D major. It is also a good opportunity to experiment with registration - there are so many effective ways one can play this piece!

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Pieces that would keep me away from a recital would include:

 

Elgar's Vesper Voluntaries.  It is definitely a mistake to play the whole lot in a single recital - I know because I sat through them once.  Fortunately there was a beautiful building to look at to relieve the utter boredom.

 

William Bolcom's Gospel Preludes (or whatever they are called).  I had forgotten about these (mercifully) but a mention by another poster caused me to reach for the air freshener.

 

Wagner overtures arranged for organ (in fact, almost any transcriptions of orchestral music).

 

Whitlock's Organ Sonata, which seems to ramble endlessly.

 

I find Reger doesn't engage me at all, but I wouldn't actively avoid his music.

 

 

I agree with everything - except the Reger - I suppose that you are not thinking of Janet Reger?

 

I would also like to add Ireland's Elegaic Romance. A piece of absolutely nothing, if there ever was one. It does not do anything and it does not 'go' anywhere - it just gets loud, then soft, then loud, then soft - and then stops. Unfortunately it takes far too long to do the latter.

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=======================

 

Gorgeous!  Love it!

 

:(

 

MM

 

================

 

Sorry about that, I thought you meant the other Andantino in Db.

 

I know the one to which you refer as "Moonshine and Roses"

 

:huh:

 

MM

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Guest paul@trinitymusic.karoo.co.uk
84 posts and no one's mentioned Lemare's Andantino in D flat!

 

 

 

Really, for shame!! You can't give yourself the nom-de-plume/guerre Vox Humana and not approve of the single most famous piece which employs said stop!! In any case, this piece is only a light-heared trifle and was only ever intended as such.

 

Look, let's be balanced about this - nobody is going to like every composer's efforts, by why on earth should anyone expect to? It doesn't bother me if you don't like Franck or Howells or Ireland - if they bring me intense pleasure, I'm not going to be put off simply because someone out there disagrees with me.

 

I mean, for goodness sake!! Let's have our favourites and stop knocking other people's favourites.

 

I have a standard text book here in which it says that Balfour Gardiner's Evening Hymn is poor church music.

Does that stop me wanting my choir to perform it well? No.

Does that stop it communicating with congregations in a special way virtually every time it is performed? No.

Does that tell me anything about Balfour Gardiner, the man? No.

IMHO it is a work of genius, and if I were capable of setting a text, any text as well as that once in my life I'd be happy.

 

 

All it tells me is that some aged academic values his own opinions much too highly.

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I have a standard text book here in which it says that Balfour Gardiner's Evening Hymn is poor church music. 

Does that stop me wanting my choir to perform it well? No.

Does that stop it communicating with congregations in a special way virtually every time it is performed? No.

Does that tell me anything about Balfour Gardiner, the man? No. 

IMHO it is a work of genius, and if I were capable of setting a text, any text as well as that once in my life I'd be happy.

I agree wholeheartedly with you on this. (But I do wish people wouldn't do it in Latin, which always sounds far too cool and clinical for me.)

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Really, for shame!!  You can't give yourself the nom-de-plume/guerre Vox Humana and not approve of the single most famous piece which employs said stop!!  In any case, this piece is only a light-heared trifle and was only ever intended as such. 

 

Look, let's be balanced about this - nobody is going to like every composer's efforts, by why on earth should anyone expect to? It doesn't bother me if you don't like Franck or Howells or Ireland - if they bring me intense pleasure, I'm not going to be put off simply because someone out there disagrees with me.

 

I mean, for goodness sake!!  Let's have our favourites and stop knocking other people's favourites.

 

I have a standard text book here in which it says that Balfour Gardiner's Evening Hymn is poor church music. 

Does that stop me wanting my choir to perform it well? No.

Does that stop it communicating with congregations in a special way virtually every time it is performed? No.

Does that tell me anything about Balfour Gardiner, the man? No. 

IMHO it is a work of genius, and if I were capable of setting a text, any text as well as that once in my life I'd be happy. 

All it tells me is that some aged academic values his own opinions much too highly.

 

=====================

 

Oh, come on Paul!

 

The enormous FUN of this thread I anticipated right from the start, and the whole point of the exercise was to reveal likes, dislikes, prejudices and passions. It was never intended as an essay in destructive criticism or composer-bashing.

 

What makes a great performer?

 

It is someone who has a bee in his/her bonnet about something they find special; sometimes to the exclusion of almost all else. Ton Koopman is a case in point, who has made Bach his absolute speciality as a scholar. The world would be a poorer place for his scholarship and even some of his wilder moments....he opens eyes and ears like no other.

 

People often ask me why I like Reger, and why I even go to enormous expense to hear it played in Holland......about £120 every time I go, in fact.

 

I don't know the answer to the question, but I find myself totally immersed in the linear melancholy, the depth, the intellect and even the intensely isolated, lonely tragedy Reger expressed; perhaps without even realising it. Humour and mischief are the perfect foil to all that, and I have these in abundance.

 

So if "Vox Humana" refers to Reger as "Musical Black Forest Gateau," I can appreciate the humour without changing my feelings towards the genius of Max Reger.

 

It takes a special kind of person to refer to Pablo Picasso as "something of a daub artist," which is exactly what Brian Sewell said of him.

 

I feel sure that Brian Sewell would be the first to laugh at his own joke and his own prejudices, and the trick is to laugh WITH him rather than at the object of his scorn.

 

All composers are great, but some are greater than others of course. There are few great critics and absolutely no armchair composers.

 

I still hate Howells!

 

:huh:

 

MM

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There's two?!  :(  :huh:

 

 

Yippeee! Now off to see if I can find any recordings of the efforts of Caleb Simper. After the praise it has been accorded here I just know I shall love it, and I think I'll put on Jane Parker-Smith playing Lefebure-Wely to listen to while I conduct my enquiries since Priory have yet to release any of the 3 CDs from Liverpool Metropolitan CathedraL devoted to LWs music. An essential purchase and bound to become a best seller!!

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Yippeee! Now off to see if I can find any recordings of the efforts of Caleb Simper.
The man who started me on the organ when I was nine or ten played little else! But he never formally introduced me to its delights - he got me a book of Thiman instead. So I used to have a wicked little dabble at Simper when he wasn't looking! I think that's probably why I ended up going through my teenage years loathing virtually everything written between Bach and Debussy. I've mellowed a bit with age.

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Yippeee! Now off to see if I can find any recordings of the efforts of Caleb Simper. After the praise it has been accorded  here I just know I shall love it, and I think I'll put on Jane Parker-Smith playing Lefebure-Wely  to listen to while I conduct my enquiries since Priory have yet to release any of the 3 CDs from Liverpool Metropolitan CathedraL devoted to LWs music. An essential purchase and bound to become a best seller!!

 

===================

 

I'm sorry, I've never heard of Caleb Simper.

 

Was he a copntrapuntist?

 

:huh:

 

MM

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Guest Lee Blick

I love Lemare's Andantino in Db.

 

I have all three Hindemith Sonatas. I started to sight read the 1st movt of Sonata no.1 and got bored after about 30 seconds and stopped.

 

I tried to get into Simon Preston's Alleluyas, but a lot of it sounds a bit like the Munsters.

 

I was given a whole load of stuff by, Thiman, Sumsion, Pritchard, Wills, and lots of obscure music by English composers I never heard of. They are OK for sight-reading fodder. I find Matthias a bit tedious. And Stanford isn't exactly inspiring.

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I agree wholeheartedly with you on this. (But I do wish people wouldn't do it in Latin, which always sounds far too cool and clinical for me.)

 

 

AAAAARRRRRGGGGHHHH!!!!!

 

In English?! Never! It sounds far better in Latin! But, there we go again - exactly as Paul says - 'One man's meat is another man's dead sheep'.... or whatever it is.

 

:huh:

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=====================

 

Oh, come on Paul!

 

The enormous FUN of this thread I anticipated right from the start, and the whole point of the exercise was to reveal likes, dislikes, prejudices and passions. It was never intended as an essay in destructive criticism or composer-bashing. ...

 

... So if "Vox Humana" refers to Reger as "Musical Black Forest Gateau," I can appreciate the humour without changing my feelings towards the genius of Max Reger.

 

It takes a special kind of person to refer to Pablo Picasso as "something of a daub artist," which is exactly what Brian Sewell said of him.

 

Mind you, this was probably no idle comment - this chap really does know what he is talking about! His television programmes are worth watching just for his voice

 

 

 

Yes - I think that this thread is enormous fun - just as long as Brian does not locate a recording of the complete works of Caleb Simper....

 

I suppose that J.H. Maunder did not write any organ music? His Olivet to Calvary * is pretty dreadful - it would be 'interesting' to hear anything which he wrote for the organ.

 

* Speaking as one who is not ashamed to say that he likes playing for performances of Stainer's The Cricifixion - I actually like listening to the piece, too!

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