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Organ Recitals And Showmanship

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=====================

 

You want SHEEP?      :)

 

Tups or ewes?  I'll sling the wellies in the trailer....very important!    :)

 

MM

Ewes - please! Really MM, what kind of person do you think I am!

 

:P

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Surely you're not saying that sheep may not safely graze in your presence?

 

:)

 

Rgds,

MJF

 

I am sorry to say not - we are talking frantic, hoover-like nibbles, always looking over their shoulders....

 

 

.... hang on - do sheep even have shoulders?

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I am sorry to say not - we are talking frantic, hoover-like nibbles, always looking over their shoulders....

.... hang on - do sheep even have shoulders?

An organist made headline news

With his friends, all rams and ewes.

Papers say it's absurd,

That his concert they heard,

Seated shoulder-to-shoulder in pews.

 

 

I don't think I've got much future as a poet, but there you go.

 

Rgds

MJF

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By the way, didn't GTB once say that even cows mooing in field can make a pleasant noise, but it still wasn't music.

 

However, sheep were never in the race at all ...

 

Rgds

MJF

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By the way, didn't GTB once say that even cows mooing in field can make a pleasant noise, but it still wasn't music.

 

However, sheep were never in the race at all ...

 

Rgds

MJF

 

 

No - but they are soooooooo cute, though....

 

[Not now, Flossie.]

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No - but they are soooooooo cute, though....

 

[Not now, Flossie.]

Ah, but are they still so cute when they must be rainbow-coloured, and cannot be black (or white, or yellow, or any other colour that might possibly give offence)?

 

Personally, I prefer my sheep young, cooked, and with some nice mint sauce.

 

Rgds

MJF

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Guest Barry Oakley
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It was good to read Brian Child's recollection of Peter Goodman who held the post of city organist and custodian of Hull’s City Hall organ for over 34 years. Peter is now a youthful mid-octogenarian and still spends at least 30 minutes every day practising scales on his grand piano. In his home in Spain he also plays his pipeless organ on a daily basis, over time giving an airing to the whole organ repertoire.

 

Roy, who I have known since he was a toddler, as well as being a conductor of international repute, is also an FRCO. I first heard him play the organ when I was a chorister at Holy Trinity, Hull, and Roy was barely eight. His feet could hardly reach the pedals. Indeed, without seeing who was at the console, I thought it was his father who was playing a piece of Vierne.

 

And when his father gave his last recital at Hull City Hall some 15 years ago, Roy was in the audience and I afterwards asked him if he would play the organ for me, not least for old times sake. Apologetically he said that he had not touched the organ for at least a dozen years yet proceeded to play some Widor and Whitlock in a most accomplished and faultless manner.

 

The whole Goodman family remains deeply steeped in musical activity. Mother Mary, also in her 80’s, has in recent times published an excellent violin tutoring system; daughter Wendy (Waldock) is a highly accomplished cellist; her sister, Jennifer, is an equally accomplished clarinetist, and brother, Malcolm, excels on the French horn. All of them, like father Peter and brother (son) Roy, studied at the Royal College of Music.

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It was interesting to read this. I have pleasant memories of an old Vista recording of Peter Goodman playing the Hull City Hall organ - I think that one of the pieces on the recording was the Fanfare, by John Cook. I particularly liked the fact that he bothered to change solo stops for the second line of the first page. If you know the recording, do you happen to know if the second stop was the Orchestral Trumpet? I assume that the first was a smaller Tuba - possibly enclosed(?).

 

Thank you!

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======================================

 

Frank Fowler may know the details of this one, but the Wurlitzer of the Gaumont State, Kilburn (N.London) used to have motorised wheels, with the organ-console sat on a platform. There was a sort of joystick device for steering it, and it is said that one famous organist operated the thing in error, and promptly started revolving mid-piece.

 

- - - - - -

 

I don't know of any console that was motorised to the extent of being driven around by the organist with a joystick. The Gaumont State organ was mounted on a lift that incorporated a turntable, on the far side of the orchestra pit away from the organ chambers which was far enough away for an acoustic time lag to be noticed by the player unless the console loudspeaker was turned on. It also had a shuttred cover that was best opened before trying to bring the console up for obvious reasons.

 

There was not a lot of room in the lift shaft if you were size XXL but provided you got it right you could come up revolving at the same time - there were a few disasters reported of the organist finishing up facing the wrong way round to the audience or as indeed MusingMuso states revolving in mid piece - an interesting piece of showmanship when playing the "Carousel Waltz".

 

Frank Fowler

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Sad to say, but Cochereau as well.

Pierre

 

Indeed - I 'remembered' his anniversary (5/6-iii-1984) on the Sunday night (5-iii-2006) by playing my own transcription of Variation IV from his improvisation Variations sur 'O fili et filiae' as the Sortie at Evensong.

 

Unfortunately, my desire to drape the organ console in black velvet and place several lit candles around and about met with little support from the churchwardens....

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You will also have difficulty finding an organ that can be heard above them!  They certainly drowned out the organ in their various concerts at Halifax PC, and the organ there isn't exactly quiet.

 

Isn't there some repertoire for organ and small brass ensemble by the Gabrielli's?  Or are they arrangements?  I've never been able to find any in the catalogues.  Not, of course, that a moderm trombone was what Gabrielli would would have had in mind.

 

================

 

He he! I can well imagine that "Dyke" fairly rocked the rafters. They're fairly stunning aren't they?

 

Still, at least the vicar wouldn't complain at Halifax, considering that Philip Wilby is her husband!

 

I couldn't possibly comment about the authenticity of a modern trombone for Gabrieli, but since when has that worried anyone at Halifax?

 

That pedal Ophicleide (16" wg) for Bach?

 

Talk about "Cor Blimey!"

 

:)

 

MM

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It was interesting to read this. I have pleasant memories of an old Vista recording of Peter Goodman playing the Hull City Hall organ - I think that one of the pieces on the recording was the Fanfare, by John Cook. I particularly liked the fact that he bothered to change solo stops for the second line of the first page. If you know the recording, do you happen to know if the second stop was the Orchestral Trumpet? I assume that the first was a smaller Tuba - possibly enclosed(?).

 

Thank you!

 

+++++++++++++++++

 

 

The second stop is indeed the Orchestral Trumpet, and right at the end, I think you hear both the Tuba and Orchestral Trumpet together, but sensibly, Peter avoided using the 16ft Tuba on the pedals, which would have destroyed the organ, tha hall and much of the surrounding area !!

 

It's about the only recording I know of where one actually hears a 32ft Diaphone, but I think Simon Preston used it on his recording there also.

 

Now THERE'S an organ which would blow "The Black Dyke Band" into the river!

 

That Orchestral Trumpet has always interested me, because it, or something obviously quite like it, was always on the organ long before Compton set foot in the place. Some will recall that Alfred Hollins wrote the "Trumpet Minuet" and specified an "Orchestral Trumpet" in the registration. As there weren't too many about, one assumes that it refers to Hull.

 

So who, I wonder, supplied that reed?

 

Incidentally, John Cook's Fanfare is dedicated to Robert Munns, and apart from Halifax PC, Hull City Hall was the only other place where I met met him. I think he, Peter Goodman and myself ate lunch at the back of the hall.

 

I discovered that the original signed manuscript copy of the Cook Fanfare was stolen from Robert's car in Skipton, North Yorkshire, and he never got it back.

 

MM

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Ah, but are they still so cute when they must be rainbow-coloured, and cannot be black (or white, or yellow, or any other colour that might possibly give offence)?

 

Personally, I prefer my sheep young, cooked, and with some nice mint sauce.

 

Rgds

MJF

 

====================

 

This is blatant "rainbow colour-ism" and I hope you will retract that immediately!

 

I have many friends who would flock to my defence, if I can round them up when the snow melts.

 

:)

 

MM

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I didn't do National Service!

 

Just how OLD do you think I am?

 

However, I WAS named after a certain Colonel-in-Chief of a certain Scottish Regiment, thanks to my Scots father, and it seems that this chap may have been as mad as myself.

 

MM

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Guest Barry Oakley
+++++++++++++++++

The second stop is indeed the Orchestral Trumpet, and right at the end, I think you hear both the Tuba and Orchestral Trumpet together, but sensibly, Peter avoided using the 16ft Tuba on the pedals, which would have destroyed the organ, tha hall and much of the surrounding area !!

 

It's about the only recording I know of where one actually hears a 32ft Diaphone, but I think Simon Preston used it on his recording there also.

 

Now THERE'S an organ which would blow "The Black Dyke Band" into the river!

 

That Orchestral Trumpet has always interested me, because it, or something obviously quite like it, was always on the organ long before Compton set foot in the place. Some will recall that Alfred Hollins wrote the "Trumpet Minuet" and specified an "Orchestral Trumpet" in the registration. As there weren't too many about, one assumes that it refers to Hull.

 

So who, I wonder, supplied that reed?

 

Incidentally, John Cook's Fanfare is dedicated to Robert Munns, and apart from Halifax PC, Hull City Hall was the only other place where I met met him. I think he, Peter Goodman and myself ate lunch at the back of the hall.

 

I discovered that the original signed manuscript copy of the Cook Fanfare was stolen from Robert's car in Skipton, North Yorkshire, and he never got it back.

 

MM

I have just finished speaking on the telephone with Peter re the Cook “Fanfare” and he says that his memory now plays a few tricks on him. He would need to play the LP again in order to refresh his memory, but he rather fancies he may have started out using the solo Bombarde (Compton) and then on to the Orchestral Trumpet (I think it was the original Forster & Andrews). When he gets back to me I will give you his verdict. Incidentally, 55 years ago I was in the organ chamber at Hull City Hall observing the Orchestral Trumpet being voiced insitu. I’m glad to say my hearing is still very much intact.

 

Re the Simon Preston recording on the Hull City Hall organ, organists and enthusiasts of the instrument in Hull were more than miffed when the LP cover showed SP sitting at the console of Westminster Abbey.

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I didn't do National Service!

 

Just how OLD do you think I am?

 

However, I WAS named after a certain Colonel-in-Chief of a certain Scottish Regiment, thanks to my Scots father, and it seems that this chap may have been as mad as myself.

 

MM

 

The colonel presumably and not your Dad ? You admit to being 56 but some people are so sensitive about their age they have been known to knock a few years off! However, I am sure no true Yorkshireman would do anything like that... :)

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+++++++++++++++++

The second stop is indeed the Orchestral Trumpet, and right at the end, I think you hear both the Tuba and Orchestral Trumpet together, but sensibly, Peter avoided using the 16ft Tuba on the pedals, which would have destroyed the organ, tha hall and much of the surrounding area !!

 

It's about the only recording I know of where one actually hears a 32ft Diaphone, but I think Simon Preston used it on his recording there also.

 

Now THERE'S an organ which would blow "The Black Dyke Band" into the river!

 

That Orchestral Trumpet has always interested me, because it, or something obviously quite like it, was always on the organ long before Compton set foot in the place. Some will recall that Alfred Hollins wrote the "Trumpet Minuet" and specified an "Orchestral Trumpet" in the registration. As there weren't too many about, one assumes that it refers to Hull.

 

So who, I wonder, supplied that reed?

 

Incidentally, John Cook's Fanfare is dedicated to Robert Munns, and apart from Halifax PC, Hull City Hall was the only other place where I met met him. I think he, Peter Goodman and myself ate lunch at the back of the hall.

 

I discovered that the original signed manuscript copy of the Cook Fanfare was stolen from Robert's car in Skipton, North Yorkshire, and he never got it back.

 

MM

 

MM - If the Cook is dedicated to Robert Munns (who was my first organ teacher) - who is the C.E. whose initials appear at the top of the score - 'for C.E.'? There's no mention of Robert that I can see. Not questioning the veracity of your account - just curious!

S

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I have just finished speaking on the telephone with Peter re the Cook “Fanfare” and he says that his memory now plays a few tricks on him. He would need to play the LP again in order to refresh his memory, but he rather fancies he may have started out using the solo Bombarde (Compton) and then on to the Orchestral Trumpet (I think it was the original Forster & Andrews). When he gets back to me I will give you his verdict. Incidentally, 55 years ago I was in the organ chamber at Hull City Hall observing the Orchestral Trumpet being voiced insitu. I’m glad to say my hearing is still very much intact.

 

Re the Simon Preston recording on the Hull City Hall organ, organists and enthusiasts of the instrument in Hull were more than miffed when the LP cover showed SP sitting at the console of Westminster Abbey.

 

 

That is my information too. In 1974 when the record was just released I wrote to Peter to ask if he had a copy of the City Hall Organ Specification (no NPOR accessible on line then !!) and some questions about his segment of the LP. I got back a very nice letter plus his copy of the specification as it then stood for me to copy since he only had the one copy and had to trust me to return it. I did (that is both copy it, laid out as it was on the old light touch console, and return it). I do hope the Post Office delivered it but one had less cause for reservations in those days about the trustworthiness and reliability of the GPO. I think I still have the letter in my files along with my correspondence with Michael Smythe and the Programmes from all the City Hall Recitals I attended, including that to celebrate Peter Goodman's 50th birthday. After lunch I will see if I can dig it out. Corroboration as we lawyers say !

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MM - If the Cook is dedicated to Robert Munns (who was my first organ teacher) - who is the C.E. whose initials appear at the top of the score - 'for C.E.'? There's no mention of Robert that I can see. Not questioning the veracity of your account - just curious!

S

 

Christopher Ede, pageant master at the 1951 Festival of Britain concert at Hampton Court palace. RM recorded this work at Huddersfield Town Hall (TPLS 13022) and the sleeve notes written by Felix Aprahamian state: "In 1951, John Cook composed music for the Festival of Britain Pageant at Hampton Court and this fanfare, based on music from that score, is dedicated to the Pageant-Master, Christopher Ede/. It may be that RM was the first to record it. Curiously the LP also contains what must surely be the first recording of Leighton's Et Resurrexit which was composed for, and dedicated to RM, who gave the first performance at St Columba's Church of Scotland in London. The other pieces on the LP were Robert Cundick's Sonatina and Myron Roberts' Homage to Perotin

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I am sorry to say not - we are talking frantic, hoover-like nibbles, always looking over their shoulders....

.... hang on - do sheep even have shoulders?

 

According to the butchery trade yes - "shoulder of lamb" and "shoulder of mutton" as per window tickets !!

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Christopher Ede, pageant master at the 1951 Festival of Britain concert at Hampton Court palace. RM recorded this work at Huddersfield Town Hall (TPLS 13022) and the sleeve notes written by Felix Aprahamian state: "In 1951, John Cook composed music for the Festival of Britain Pageant at Hampton Court and this fanfare, based on music from that score, is dedicated to the Pageant-Master, Christopher Ede/. It may be that RM was the first to record it. Curiously the LP also contains what must surely be the first recording of Leighton's Et Resurrexit which was composed for, and dedicated to RM, who gave the first performance at St Columba's Church of Scotland in London. The other pieces on the LP were Robert Cundick's Sonatina and Myron Roberts' Homage to Perotin

 

=======================

 

I wonder if my memory is playing tricks, or whether I haven't just got a minor detail wrong concerning the dedication of the Cook "Fanfare?"

 

I "think" Robert Munns was the first to record this work at Huddersfield Town Hall, and that recording certainly includes the Leighton "Et Resurrexit," so it may be that I am getting the two pieces confused.

 

Anyway...starting again...ONE of the manuscripts was stolen out of Robert's car........ :unsure:

 

I seem to recall that we were chatting in a pub in Halifax, so the lines of communication may have been a bit obscured.........by the background noise, of course.

 

MM

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+++++++++++++++++

That Orchestral Trumpet has always interested me, because it, or something obviously quite like it, was always on the organ long before Compton set foot in the place. Some will recall that Alfred Hollins wrote the "Trumpet Minuet" and specified an "Orchestral Trumpet" in the registration. As there weren't too many about, one assumes that it refers to Hull.

 

MM

 

 

Hollins being a native of Hull who presumably did not mind going back from time to time this has to be a possibility. But there is also an Orchestral Trumpet though somewhat less assertive on the organ of the Usher Hall in Edinburgh and since Hollins was organist of a church in that city for 42 years, and since at least some regard A Trumpet Minuet as Hollins' take on the Eighteenth century model of a trumpet voluntary it also has to be a possibility that the Edinburgh stop was the one he had in mind

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I have just finished speaking on the telephone with Peter re the Cook “Fanfare” and he says that his memory now plays a few tricks on him. He would need to play the LP again in order to refresh his memory, but he rather fancies he may have started out using the solo Bombarde (Compton) and then on to the Orchestral Trumpet (I think it was the original Forster & Andrews). When he gets back to me I will give you his verdict. Incidentally, 55 years ago I was in the organ chamber at Hull City Hall observing the Orchestral Trumpet being voiced insitu. I’m glad to say my hearing is still very much intact.

 

Re the Simon Preston recording on the Hull City Hall organ, organists and enthusiasts of the instrument in Hull were more than miffed when the LP cover showed SP sitting at the console of Westminster Abbey.

 

 

===================

 

It's a funny thing, but I immediately thought this the moment I had clicked "send" in my reply.

 

The trouble is, there are so MANY reeds at Hull. I'm fairly certain that Peter used the Tuba towards the end though.

 

The Bombarde is probably an extension of the Pedal rank, and may well be diaphonic in part, but I'm sure Peter would know.

 

The Tuba is a VERY big sound, and at 16ft, absolutely shattering. Peter used to very sensibly warn people about using ALL the reeds together, which in the hall is unbearable almost, and in any event, the reeds all end up brawling with each other in a most unseemly way.....just like a Hull City and a Kingston Rovers match on a Saturday afternoon, but without the blood and broken limbs.

 

I suspect it is a modern re-creation of the Winchester Organ...."none who drew near could bear the sound etc."

 

I kid you not, but full organ can be heard quite clearly down the street, above the noise of city-traffic.

 

I think it was Andrew Leach, the former sub-organist at Beverley, who described the instrument wonderfully, with the words:-

 

"Full organ is a HELL of a bloody noise, you know."

 

:unsure:

 

MM

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