Jump to content
Mander Organ Builders Forum

Cathedral organ without 32' stops


Recommended Posts

Recently while browsing through a list of specifications of organs built by klais I stumbled across a fairly new organ that at the Cathedral of St. Mary in Spain that I have heard about. But what I found interesting is that this particular organ doesn't seem to contain any stops at 32' pith.

It's possible that their may be plans to add any ranks at 32' pitch at a latter date but I can't say for sure as usually any additions are often marked as prepared for.

https://klais.de/m.php?sid=190&zeiger=48

Link to post
Share on other sites

The pedal does have a couple of harmonics of 32' though, which would give gravitas in louder registrations - though not that quiet purring that some English organs are so good at.  I remember the old organ at Ch Ch Oxford being a good example; but the present organ there also has no 32' (but it's much smaller than that Klais).

Paul

Link to post
Share on other sites

In the UK, of C of E Cathedrals, neither Oxford (Christ Church) or Wells Cathedral have 32' stops - and Gloucester and Chichester only have 32' reeds. There may be others

Neither St. Chad's Cathedral Birmingham or Clifton Cathedral have a 32' stop! I'm certain there are other RC cathedrals without!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Worcester only has a single 32ft reed. There are two electronic 32ft flues provided from the digital organ in the nave. The intention is to reintroduce the currently silent 32ft pipes in the Hope Jones case when the nave/transept organ is realised.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a cathedral, but the church where my wife sings: Christ Church, West Didsbury, Manchester, enjoys an organ of 43 stops including three Chamades, a 32' Bourdon and a surprisingly effective digital 32' reed.  Not a bad collection compared to some cathedrals, considering this is only a small parish church.

I have never been particularly enamoured of electronic additions to otherwise completely straight organs, but this one has made me think again.

I think the church (and choir) are very lucky to have such an instrument.  I suppose it all comes down to available funding, though.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, John Robinson said:

I think the church (and choir) are very lucky to have such an instrument.  I suppose it all comes down to available funding, though.

 

Some of the phraseology in the write-up on he church website is interesting!

………………………. and all paid for by the local council - now that is clever!

The church, I see, also boasts a high-quality 'toaster' as well as a 'Makin' analogue 'in store'!!!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

10 hours ago, John Robinson said:

Christ Church, West Didsbury, Manchester, enjoys an organ of 43 stops including three Chamades, a 32' Bourdon and a surprisingly effective digital 32' reed.  Not a bad collection compared to some cathedrals, considering this is only a small parish church.

Definitely worth looking at NPOR E02082 for the photographs of the unusually fine case and information about the organ’s pedigree: essentially by George Sixsmith partly using a transplanted Binns from Peebles (the chamades, voiced by Nicholson’s, being later additions).  

I used to play a small organ by Sixsmith in the south of England which also had a striking modern pipe display.  It was beautifully made, comfortable to play, and completely reliable.

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, S_L said:

 

Some of the phraseology in the write-up on he church website is interesting!

………………………. and all paid for by the local council - now that is clever!

The church, I see, also boasts a high-quality 'toaster' as well as a 'Makin' analogue 'in store'!!!

 

I'm afraid I haven't heard, or even seen, the toasters!  The only organ used in the concerts I have attended has been the pipe organ.
I can't speak for services, though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes that Didsbury organ is quite the mammoth two manual organ. Paid for by the city council in compensation for changing the position of the main door of the church due to a road widening scheme that never quite happened - what a contrast to today where the same council is unable to afford the restoration of one of the country's finest Cavaille-Coll organs during the restoration of Manchester town hall.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Contrabombarde said:

Yes that Didsbury organ is quite the mammoth two manual organ. Paid for by the city council in compensation for changing the position of the main door of the church due to a road widening scheme that never quite happened - what a contrast to today where the same council is unable to afford the restoration of one of the country's finest Cavaille-Coll organs during the restoration of Manchester town hall.

I didn't know about that.  I assume that the main door was originally facing the adjacent Princess Road.  The main entrance is now at the south-east (liturgical) corner of the building.  Very fortunate compensation payment, I'm sure readily accepted!

(Marge has asked me to recommend their choral concerts at the church - The William Byrd Singers!)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I would compare digital organs to microwave ovens rather than toasters as I think their was some skepticism towards this appliance.

I remember an old TV series called Pie in the Sky starring Richard Griffiths about a detective who dreams of retiring from the police force to run his own restaurant. In some of the early episodes I recall Henry Crabbe being quite critical of microwave ovens.

I faintly remember a scene in a restaurant or cafe where Henry complimented the owner for launch who replied with a thank you and then mentioned that he was thinking of getting a microwave oven. Henry then went into this long about how it would down grade the place and would then start finding all sorts of riffraff coming in through the door.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...