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Pierre Lauwers

Worcester Cathedral's Organ

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Yes, I've seen once electric cables that had been simply cut in a cathedral organ that had been condemned because it was "decadent". This was the usual word in Belgium 20 years ago. (Even the Cavaillé-Coll of the Brussel's music school was qualified as "decadent". It was nearly the same as St-François de Sales Lyon!!!)

 

About Mr Phillip Klais having taken place just under the suspended section of the Cologne's cathedral organ: Maybe that's the reason they did not allow me to enter for the inauguration recital. I'd just taken the opportunity to buy some tools cheaper than in Belgium, among which a really big steel saw. I shall have to apologize and explain I am not a terrorist.

 

Best wishes,

Pierre Lauwers.

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I rather agree with some of the sentiments of deadsheepstew. If those of you in England feel passionate about the retention of the Worcester organ why not form a lobby group and approach the Cathedral Chapter, Diocese, Diocesan organ advisor etc. Can anyone get alongside the Organist and Master of the Choristers? The retention of many organs is usually the result of a passionate and determined person attracting a like minded philosophy around him/her. I fought for the preservation of the Wellington Town Hall organ on one hand and lost a battle with an embittered former Cathedral Organist of Auckland who saw no merit in authentic restoration of the 1909 3 manual romantic organ he was in charge of on the other. It was electrocuted and somewhat neo-baroquised by NZ's less discerning firm. Today, only 20 years later everyone regrets that.

 

I too concur with the sentiments about the proposed case designs.

 

Wouldn't it be best to overhaul everything of the Chancel organ and retain that as a musical and artistic (in the broader sense of the word) monument to various important periods of Cathedral organ building. Then commission a new instrument within the existing Transept Hill case in the spirit of the William Hill organ it once valiantly contained but retaining the Hope-Jones solo and pedal registers. What a wonderful project for the right builder and what a British solution for a British Cathedral. The Hill would play all the GREAT repertoire, accompany congregations superbly as pristine Hill & Son organs do and you'd have those unique Hope-Jones voices preserved for colour purposes. The specification of both Hill organs are in various publications.

 

Players and affeciandos would flock to this and Worcester would have two contrasting instruments of enormous merit at well under the estimated cost of two completely new organs.

 

How about a letter writing campaign to the organ magazines?

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About Mr Phillip Klais having taken place just under the suspended section of the Cologne's cathedral organ: Maybe that's the reason they did not allow me to enter for the inauguration recital. I'd just taken the opportunity to buy some tools cheaper than in Belgium, among which a really big steel saw. I shall have to apologize and explain I am not a terrorist.

 

Best wishes,

Pierre Lauwers.

 

Terrorist or not, I think you have to explain why you would want to cut the steel cables.

 

John Pike Mander

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Terrorist or not, I think you have to explain why you would want to cut the steel cables.

 

John Pike Mander

 

Of course I did not!

I just bought these stupid tools at a bargain for use back here,

not to destroy the organ...

 

Best wishes,

Pierre Lauwers.

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Guest Roffensis
Greetings Gentlemen!

 

As one who is from Worcester and was taught and brought up on the old girl, I must say that she really is somewhat past her sell by date.  It is sad that the sound of that instrument will be lost, however, it is an absolute hotchpotch of Hope-Jones, Harrison and Harrison and Walker and Wood Wordsworth.  The instrument is very much on its last legs and we must be kind and have her 'put-down'.

 

The original Hill instrument was taken out (all except the Transept Case) when Hope Jones built the then new instrument - if you wish to hear a large part of this and see part of the original quire case from the instrument, then visit the church of All Saints, Cheltenham, Glos - this is where a large proportion of it remains!

 

Also, given the size of the Cathedral at Worcester I must say that I think it is an excellent idea to have two instruments... What we tend to forget in the UK is that most of our Cathedral Organs cannot fulfil their job effectively as they are trying to do two several things at once... not least try and fill two spaces... that of the Quire and the Nave.  This is the problem that is inherent at Worcester, and with any luck should set an example to us all and lead us forward.

 

With very best wishes,

 

James

 

Lots of organs in England are "hotchpotches" though, and a new action and possible rearangement of layout, keeping the essential character would be quite enough. I don't see Worcester as an example for anyone to follow, it is a very shortsighted scheme indeed. Keeping the current job in essence would be a lot cheaper than a totally new organ, which sin't needed.Of course a nave organ is a good plan and that could easily still be put in. But why axe a tonally excellent organ. It may be by various builders, and may have some unusual qualities, but these very qualities give it the unique sound it has. I personally love it and note that a lot people are against the outing of it. It is perfect for the use it is put to for services, and is also an excellent recital instrument. Worcester is not so large as far as cathedrals go, in fact it is more akin to Hereford and Rochester, and rather modest in size. I hope the money never comes forward to do the planned work, and I certainly wont be bothering with the place anymore, and a lot of fellow organists feel exactly the same.

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Hmm.  Taking that amalgam argument to its logical extension would surely mean scrapping some of the finest instruments in existence.  Surely the answer is to not tart around doing bits and bobs and trying to 'improve' things - but to rip out the lot, fit entirely new actions, soundboards and winding (i.e. do a proper job on the troublesome bits), and incorporate a two-manual 15 stopper at the West End for the choral society, all played from a moveable (possibly wireless) console, with the option of an upstairs tracker for the west end?

 

If that's not possible, then I can only hope that a) the wind system is patched up a bit and some damn good recordings made, or preferably B) it gets put up somewhere else.  Yes, a line must be drawn in the sand.  If it ain't bust, don't fix it.  Tonally, it's far from bust.

 

 

AMEN to that! Excellent post.

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Sorry guys, but it is my personal opinion that there is an awful lot of brown stuff that emerges from male cows in circulation.  So, I'm going to add some more.

 

Maybe the issue is that there is no real forum for debate and collective historic decision making.  The National Trust, English Heritage and all these other organisations exist to protect and maintain our national parks, historic homes and so on - I may be wrong, but it seems that the Diocesan Organ Advisors scheme is largely suspect and BIOS has only limited, passive influence.  I think there is a good case for a little enforced Communist-style dictatorship to say "no - this is a historic organ.  It works.  The things that are wrong with it can be cheaply fixed and realistically prevented from happening again in the next hundred years.  It is necessary to preserve this instrument, and there is no sound justification for scrapping it."

 

None of us, it would seem from another thread, would hesitate to say this about obviously outstanding or important instruments like New College Ox, Pem-broke Cambridge, Grosvenor Chapel, Bristol Cathedral et al.  They all have important historical things to say, either as new instruments of their type or as diligent historic reconstructions, and are highly effective musical instruments in their own right. 

 

But so was the old Hill at Bath Abbey.  I was quite closely acquainted with it, and its main problems were haphazard internal construction and too many actions meaning everything spoke at different speeds.  It had some of the most outstanding fluework imaginable - thoughts of the the 4' Flute on the Great still make me go misty-eyed - and I really don't think the replacement can be considered an improvement, if you compare it with how the Hill could have been after a sensitive and thorough reconstruction on new chests and actions.  Tonally, it was capable of being absolutely stunningly beautiful, exceptionally versatile, and a testament to the legacy of its maker.  I do not hear the same being said of the Klais, or indeed many of their other instruments in this country.

 

The same probably has to go for Worcester.  It works!  Leave it alone!  Are BIOS present in this debate?  If the music scene at Worcester supposedly needs reinvigorating, and I'm not sure it does, then I'm sure that has little to do with the organ - the Oundle Festival has no problem being highly invigorated, even with that asthmatic production-line ratbag of a Frobenius centre stage and a clonky old Walker in the parish church.

 

Commissioning Hope Jones was a brave and risky move, and successive generations have made it into a really splendid musical instrument.  I for one would crawl on hands and knees to see it even though Virgin Trains could probably get me there in half the time.  If Worcester really have money to burn, I could do with some of it and I'm sure Christian Aid could, too. 

 

If it really is up to us - as some seem to think - to allow an institution's organist to be responsible for the stewardship (or, in this case, destruction) of a part of national history, we can wave goodbye now to a whole raft of amazing instruments.  For many it is already too late.  We can then secure ourselves a place in history by becoming the generation that sat back, entrusted the asylum to the lunatics, and wondered why it all went wrong.  We currently trust a slew of unregulated advisors and unaccountable private consultants on the payroll of who knows how many organbuilders, and rely on people like JPM to have the commercial integrity to refuse to make fatal or irresponsible alterations.  No law or statute stands between that incredible instrument at Bristol and its replacement with a Percy Daniel 6 rank extension with pedals by Copeman Hart, and that stinks. 

 

In the absence of any such move, I hereby volunteer my services for helping load the old girl up into a couple of artic's and setting her up where someone will appreciate the generations of hard work, initiative, skill and musicianship she contains.  Sad thing is, though, the instrument and the building is the combination that matters. 

 

Might sound quite good in Christchurch Priory, actually!

 

 

There does need to be better regulation of our organ heritage's fate. It seems that any organist can just moan about a given organ, and get almost free hand to get it outed, and we have all witnessed the destruction of some wonderful instruments. Christchurch oxford is a glowing example of what not to do, and the current Reiger, interesting as it might be to some, is not suited to Anglican church music. The old Willis/Harrison was. I heard it. The "new" fails dismally and sounds perfectly foul in Anglican Traditional music. Why anyone would want to out Worcester is amazing to me, and the loony bin is the ideal place for those who advocate such moves anywhere in my personal opinion, rather than the waste bin for very real parts of our heritage. Where on earth does it stop, where does one draw the line?. The current way things are done, with cheapo electric pedal basses and so on, is just so very sad. It really is a very shameful state of affairs. The rest you say perfectly well in your posting. Well said, I admire you for it.

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Future generations will surely think whooppee, our cup run'eth over.

 

As it is, Worcester is not exactly over endowed with good instruments right now. When the Three Choirs Festival comes to town every 3 years, as far as organ recitals are concerned within the city walls they have Trevor Tipple's marvellous organ at St Martin's and ... er.... that's about it.

 

A new Nicholson and Kenneth Tickell in the Cathedral would not only provide more choice for solo recitals, they would also be a great addition for works for orchestra and chorus. They would re-invigorate the Cathedral's music life in a way that a restoration of the existing tired instrument would not. As for Worcester being a provincial Cathedral, you only have to look at somewhere like Lincoln, which is comparable (in a provincial sense) to Worcester, to see what the combination of a superb organ and the right personnel can do to project an image way beyond the immediate environment.

 

Lincoln's programme of organ events for 2005 is spectacular for a so-called 'provincial' cathedral. A series of four recitals by French players based at La Madeleine, St Eustache, Notre Dame and St Etienne-du-Mont. There is a series of all-Messiaen recitals by Colin Walsh as well as a couple of mixed programme recitals. Next month they are holding a 9 hour Organ Marathon and in October are staging an Organ Spectular featuring all 4 cathedral organists.

 

Now if that lot's provincial, this 'townie' wants some.

 

Jeremy Jones

London

 

Rubbish!

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Well,

 

It seems this "Three choir festival" has priority over anything else. As a stupid ignorant, may I ask what kind of music is played during this event? Buxtehude? Bruhns? De Grigny? César Franck? Pink Floyd? Of course I would not dare pretend a Wesley or a Howells could be included.

 

For the 1907 Walcker organ we are busy to rescue here in Namur, we provincials have taken the matter from the other side. A festival we shall of course begin right after the restauration will be over. No matter our taste(s), it will be Liszt, Reger and Karg-Elert above anything else. Not too bad music, tough.

 

Worcester's organ is not restricted to english music, tough. French and german choral works (Saint-Saëns, Liszt, Duruflé...) go very well too. The best interpretation of Saint-Saëns "Messe à quatre voix", with two organs (one of which already gone...) I know remains a LP I bought there in 1977 (Donald Hunt).

 

Best wishes,

Pierre Lauwers.

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Is this a comment on the current state of the Worcester organ? Please enlarge.

 

I think this discussion stream, now into its fifth page, has run its course.

 

Now is the time for those here who so enthusiastically, if not always convincingly, continue to object to the plan to replace the existing instrument in Worcester Cathedral with new organs by Kenneth Tickell and Nicholsons, to walk the walk rather than just talk the talk.

 

Someone once said it's good to talk, and so it is, but indulgently emoting at length on this discussion board wont do anything to stop your precious Worcester organ from being chucked in a skip.

 

Carpe diem!

Jeremy Jones

London

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Thanks for your comments, Mr Jones,

 

I agree there is no need to talk about this one or this other one being this or that.

 

May I ask some questions?

 

-Should we keep silent? Sit down and watch the pipes break down on the floor, like they did with a splendid organ some years ago in Belgium?

 

-After five pages here, do we have a hint about what the true problems are with Worcester cathedral's organ?

 

-If an organ many people like must be scrapped, like it is "their beloved organ" that "must go", are we still dealing with art or with power?

 

-Should we walk instead of talk? Where?

 

Best wishes,

Pierre Lauwers.

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Thanks for your comments, Mr Jones,

 

-Should we walk instead of talk? Where?

 

Best wishes,

Pierre Lauwers.

 

Ooo! Let's do something. Good.

 

I would suggest a well-written, diplomatic letter to the Dean & Chapter of Worcester Cathedral, copied to perhaps the Editor of the Church Times, chairman of the CCC (and whoever gives authorisation in Cathedrals for work on organs), AIOA, IBO, and some good newspapers, like the Times, Telegraph, etc.

 

I would not harp on too much about the tonal qualities of the organ - these are artistic, somewhat subjective arguments, which do not argue well. They would also undermine the creditbility of the other arguments. I would concetrate on:

* The Historical/ Heritage aspects of the organ

* Its fitness for purpose(as felt by other professionals in the field)

* The suitability of the instrument for its location

* Cost

and make it clear that the Cathedral carries the custodianship of the instrument and its uniqueness for future generations.

 

I would also allude to the point that incumbent musicians do need moderation and assistance with the custiondianship of organs of national importance, calling for the need for greater regulation in this area, pointing out that musical skill does not necessarily automatically qualify them in this area.

 

I would be itching to allude to the replacement of premier quality material with that of first class material but this, while probably true (especially with the Nicholson instrument), needs treating with understandable caution.

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I suspect that this would now be too late. If contracts are not actually signed already, then I will be surprised.

 

To reply to one of Jeremy Jones' points: I do not see why Worcester could not have invited some internationally-known recitalists. Surely it is the musicians themselves who invigorate (or re-invigorate)? Any arguments about reliabilty of the organ needs still to be placed in context. Several of us have played the Worcester organ in the last few years - presumably at different times. The fact that we all enjoyed it and that it did not fail in any way is, quite frankly, the most unbelievable co-incidence I have ever been asked to accept.

 

As for convincingly - so far, nothing which has been said in favour of ripping-out the H-J/H&H has induced me to part with one penny towards these new organs.

 

As deadsheepstew has said, why not undertake a thorough renewal of the action and wind system and leave it alone tonally, as a tribute to several builders? (Possibly also replacing the music-desk with one of solid construction.)

 

Incidentally, Mr. sheep - if you ever find a use for the Pedal borrowing of the (virtually inaudible) Choir Cor Anglais 16p at St. Peter's, do let me know....

Carpe cerevisum! B)

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Well,

 

It seems this "Three choir festival" has priority over anything else.

As a stupid ignorant, may I ask what kind of music is played during

this event? Buxtehude? Bruhns? De Grigny? César Franck? Pink Floyd?

Of course I would not dare pretend a Wesley or a Howells could

be included.

 

For the 1907 Walcker organ we are busy to rescue here in Namur,

we provincials have taken the matter from the other side. A festival

we shall of course begin right after the restauration will be over.

No matter our taste(s), it will be Liszt, Reger and Karg-Elert above

anything else. Not too bad music, tough.

 

Worcester's organ is not restricted to english music, tough. French

and german choral works (Saint-Saëns, Liszt, Duruflé...) go very

well too. The best interpretation of Saint-Saëns "Messe à quatre voix",

with two organs (one of which already gone...) I know remains a LP

I bought there in 1977 (Donald Hunt).

 

Best wishes,

Pierre Lauwers.

 

 

The saint saens messe was reissued on Decca Polygram as a CD, now deleted, I fortunately found a copy and have I think all recording per se of this job, and yes it is a superb performance, and the organ sounds simply glorious. No one could here this and fail to be impressed. Regis reissued a Abbey record of Elgar, well worth getting as it is the great Donald Hunt no less and he shows the organ as ideal for English music........

Vista did a double issue of Elgar, and another of French music, and agin the rogan comes over marvellously. More recently, the Regent "English cathedral Series" saw fit to put Worcester as the first in the series, and Mr Lucas plays it well, and it sounds great. Hmmm.........having been to its reopening in 78, it bowled me over, and it appears on numerous choral cds and lps as the perfect organ. It wont be matched......

I am frankly suspicious of the transept move, thats a lot of organ to move accross, and I was otld it was to let more light in through a interesting but covered south transept window. Doubtless tuning will be better if in the north transept

however.

I would be delighted to lobby the dean and chapter, I even wrote to them, but am still waiting for a reply some months later.

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I did not have any answer too...

 

Well, if I could have the Saint-Saëns Mass on Media player files, I could place them on the french forum in order to get about 300 french-speaking organists with us in the "Save Worcester's organ" club.

 

My LP is a bit tired, and I do not have any means to digitalize it. But whenever anybody hears it here....A fan more. Even better is the Samuel-Sebastian Wesley recording (same period, same conductor), an absolute gem. (Te Deum from the service in E major; Jubilate from the same; Anthem "Cast me not away"; Anthem "Let us lift up our heart"; Anthem "Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace". Decca/Argo, ZRG 890,1978) Go figure: ten years later, the Worcester cathedral choir was in Brussels for one recital. I was there of course and asked when the next S-S Wesley's recording would be available; the answer was "Never, it did not sell".

 

Go figure again: during 25 years I have been busy marketing worthless "on the counter" drugs. Here we deal with absolute top-class artistic "products" (I hate this word) for which there is not only no marketing at all, but even "contra-marketing"; "Don't buy that, it is bad and we shall delete it all".

Best wishes,

Pierre Lauwers.

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The Wesley recording that you refer to has an interesting photo of the choir in situ in the quire (if that makes sense) on the sleeve. This was printed with the negative upside-down with the result that cantoris and decani (the two sides) are actually printed the wrong way round.

 

I was a student in Worcester from 1976-1980, during this period Donald Hunt was something of a pioneer and visionary in introducing the great french double-organ masses into regular use. In additional to the Saint-Seans, masses by Vierne, Widor, Langlais and Villette were in repertoire. Of course english gems like Vaughan-Williams in G minor were also not neglected.

 

The "old" Worcester setup, which I've referred to earlier on this topic, with the 2-manual H&H nave organ, was perfect for the double-organ masses, and I feel priviledged to have been around at the right time to experience these with Donald's superb choir.

 

The overwelming body of opinion on this notice board would support sympathetic restoration of the quire organ whilst acknowledging the need to think again about provision in the nave. What a pity the cathedral do not share this view.

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The Wesley recording that you refer to has an interesting photo of the choir in situ in the quire (if that makes sense) on the sleeve.

(Citation)

 

Yes, it must be this one. The rest of the front side of the sleeve

is red.

 

Best wishes,

Pierre Lauwers.

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This Worcester thread has been banging on a bit now but it would be really interesting to know what is actually being proposed! Am I the only one that doesn't? Please could someone spell it all out so that I can decide whether I want to argue on one side or the other! :)

Thanks in anticipation

AJJ

 

PS Stoplists would be nice too!!

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The Wesley recording that you refer to has an interesting photo of the choir in situ in the quire (if that makes sense) on the sleeve.

(Citation)

 

Yes, it must be this one. The rest of the front side of the sleeve

is red.

 

Best wishes,

Pierre Lauwers.

 

Yes thats the one, and as you say, contemporary to the Saint Saens. Interestingly, Worcester did do another Wesley recording, two cds actually, both on Hyperion. Its also interesting to note the sheer quantity of recrdings coming out of that place during Hunts reign. I also forgot to mention that Christopher Robinson recorded a record in the EMI "Great Cathedral Organ Series", of which roughly half was resissued, and is is still available, on the Amphion label. This recording predates the 1977 Harrison work on the organ, and there are some clear differences between then and now tonally, it is now balanced and more musical, particularly after 1978 rebuild by Woods. Even then I don't think as much was done to it that needed doing. Another fairly recent restoration by Nicholsons was I think to bring the transept organ back into play fully (Diaphone disconnected still), and to be honest I thought that would have been the end of the matter. I never dreamed that less than 10 years later moves would be afoot to remove the job.

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This Worcester thread has been banging on a bit now but it would be really interesting to know what is actually being proposed! Am I the only one that doesn't? Please could someone spell it all out so that I can decide whether I want to argue on one side or the other!  :)

Thanks in anticipation

AJJ

 

PS Stoplists would be nice too!!

 

There's not a whole lot to argue about really is there? It's a case of removing a tonally excellent organ for another. Regardless of what the merits of a new organ might be, the old organ has a wonderful sound and "eclat", and is steeped in history. The arguments must surely come down to personal taste, not least of the cathedral authorities. I think most would agree that the retention of the current two choir cases, and general layout, with existing pipework, but new action, soundboards etc, would be the logical (and cheaper) solution. This is basically what Manders did at St Pauls during their excellent rebuild, with another similar approach at Rochester in particular. I say this as both organs at Rochester and Worcester are "hybrids", but lovely ones, and Rochester (as Worcester also) sounds truly amazing, when some might well have opted for a wholly new organ on the screen with tracker action. More recently the RAH is another example, we could have ended up with a continental job, but.... the old was respected warts and all, proving it can be done very successfully. We really need a regulating body in this country. How many times have I heard that "Upminster" Cathedral organ is being "restored" or rebuilt, and I think "Oh, what are they are going to do to that?". Recent ones have been Ely, Bristol, Peterborough, and in all cases my fears have been unfounded, and we seem now to generally respect even that which personally we may dislike. A look at some 70s rebuilds will make my point clearer, not least when you see certain organs now being put back more as they were, in the light of experience(!). This will not apply to Worcester if the planned work ever gets off the ground, as the organ will be gone forever. I do urge anyone with concerns to write to the Dean and Chapter, and just let them know how you feel. Local papers and nationals also can be approached. This is a good thing to do, and will prove that people do value to organ at Worcester. In any case, a new organ, with new pipework, new casework etc is going to cost very much more than a restoration of the current, which the poor thing has simply never had fully.

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There are no stoplists availaible on the Net for the projected new organs.

 

But anyway, the "Magic" of an organ like Worcester's does not lie with itsstoplist, but rather:

 

-In its incredible, "crazy" layout;

 

-In the sensibility of the several voicers that interveined, which avoided ending up with a "hotch-potch with a little of all fashionable styles from theit respective epochs", but contributed to an instrument with a style of its own.

 

And there lies the problem, or the chance, according to which hands the organ falls between.

 

This is no "formated", "no-non-sense" organ. It needs a player who is ready to accept to adapt his/her playing style to it.

 

The recordings from Donald Hunt's time blatantly demonstrate one can get absolutely all from this organ if one can ask it to do so in its own language. If I can get some in digitalized form, be sure I shall spread them worldwide.

 

I know of several such little gems. For instance, a unique Bartolomaei-Blési (1897) rebuild of a Verschneider Organ near Metz (France). Bartolomaei was a pupil of Friedrich Goll (Luzern, Swiss). He ended in a middle-of-nowhere area, so that this organ was the biggest he had to express himself -26 stops!-. He made a miniature cathedral organ of it -up to a 10 2/3' quint!-. This organ was condemned. A guy even said "Put the fire in this waste bin". Eventually, the organ fell in the hands of a sensible, clever young organist. It will be restaured as it is (maybe I did help somewhat).

 

http://olivier.schmitt.org.free.fr/site_web_moyeuvre

 

 

Best wishes,

Pierre Lauwers.

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This is no "formated", "no-non-sense" organ. It needs a player who

is ready to accept to adapt his/her playing style to it.

 

Well I wouldn't agree with that, I would say its a very easy organ to play with one of the most comfortable consoles around. If you treat the organ as a very fully specified 3-manual instrument it presents no difficulties at all.

 

Playing any of the transept solo stops from the quire console is a challenge as there is a significant time lag before the sound hits you, but for most purposes there is no need to use the solo organ as the lovely enclosed clarinet is on the choir, and the great reeds can be transferred onto to solo manual where the posaune is very effective as a solo reed.

 

The placement of the larger pedal stops in the transept case does not cause any significant problems to the player in the quire.

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Well I wouldn't agree with that, I would say its a very easy organ to play with one of the most comfortable consoles around. If you treat the organ as a very fully specified 3-manual instrument it presents no difficulties at all.

 

Playing any of the transept solo stops from the quire console is a challenge as there is a significant time lag before the sound hits you, but for most purposes there is no need to use the solo organ as the lovely enclosed clarinet is on the choir, and the great reeds can be transferred onto to solo manual where the posaune is very effective as a solo reed.

 

The placement of the larger pedal stops in the transept case does not cause any significant problems to the player in the quire.

 

 

So we should all really write polite letters and state our cases.....it's also worth remembering that Donald Hunt respected it, he coped fine with it also. What is seen on paper is not always indicative of what is there tonally.

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This Worcester thread has been banging on a bit now but it would be really interesting to know what is actually being proposed! Am I the only one that doesn't? Please could someone spell it all out so that I can decide whether I want to argue on one side or the other!   :)

Thanks in anticipation

AJJ

 

PS Stoplists would be nice too!!

 

The best I've been able to find by Googling is

 

http://www.worcestermusicandlight.com/aims.html#pipes

 

No stoplists, I'm afraid - but some nice artist's impressions. Very imaginative. I'm quite surprised they didn't come from Matthew Copley Organ Design...

 

Perhaps we could contact the appeal group to ask for more details of what is being proposed - and publish them here?

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The best I've been able to find by Googling is

 

http://www.worcestermusicandlight.com/aims.html#pipes

 

No stoplists, I'm afraid - but some nice artist's impressions. Very imaginative. I'm quite surprised they didn't come from Matthew Copley Organ Design...

 

Perhaps we could contact the appeal group to ask for more details of what is being proposed - and publish them here?

 

And while we're alldoing that, ask them to specify what's wrong with the current organ! I think the Gothic case is ok, but not needed given the current splendid cases. The other modern looking one is really quite inappropriate, although it might go well in Coventry or Clifton....

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