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The Greatest Organ-work That Isn't By Bach?

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Yes!

I do not like them :P

Pierre

 

 

I must confess that I am not that bothered, either. There seems, to me to be a certain 'detachment' about them - as if they were almost an academic exercise, rather than an outpouring of creativity; this is not, I find, something which can be applied also to the Art of Fugue, in case anyone is wondering.

 

Yes Vox, I know that they are melodious and brilliantly constructed, but to me, they seem devoid of that almost indefinable 'something' which engenders an emotional response. I can only think of them on a purely academic level, and be impressed - but not moved.

 

There is at least one section in the Dorian fugue, in which I get all trembly every time I play it, or hear it.

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Worth a try before judging.

Pierre (hiding in a nuclear shelter)

 

With certain entries brought out on the Chamades, of course.

 

*Cowers behind an enormous smoking gun....*

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====================

 

Look here chaps, if the great Carlo Curley can record the G-major Trio Sonata on a Wurlitzer, using a Chrysaglot percussion for the RH, a 4ft Flute and Kinura for the LH and an 8ft pedal Cello, even a Physharmonika is more authentic "Baroke" than that.

 

:P

 

MM

 

He did what??

 

:P

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"as if they were almost an academic exercise, rather than an outpouring of creativity"

 

(Quote)

 

This is exactly my point, tough, as this very interesting discussion here shows it,

there may be interpretation problems i.e. "over-baroquisation" in a sense that is more

20th than 18th century's.

And oh, yes, I do hate Chamades, save in a baroque spanish organ (there they are intended for detail not noise). Give me a good Tuba instead please. And of course

better kept silent in Bach.

 

Best wishes,

Pierre

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I suspect we all have a tendency to think that, to be a great work, an organ work would have to:

 

1. Be quite long

 

2. Get quite loud at some point, preferably the end

 

3. Be highly emotionally charged.

 

But why can't the Fantasy for Double Organ by Gibbons count as a great organ work, or, say, In Nomine XI by John Bull (the one with the time signature that makes it look like something from Mikrokosmos book 6)?

 

Sorry to disagree, but actually, these sound like quite sensible criteria, although there are probably others which may be considered equally apt.

 

For me, the Gibbons piece would fall into the 'pleasant' and 'interesting' - and possibly 'pioneering' brackets - but 'great'? No.

 

I find it perfectly reasonable that length and some kind of positive emotional response are involved. By its very nature, the question will provoke some emotion and engender subjective replies.

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"as if they were almost an academic exercise, rather than an outpouring of creativity"

 

(Quote)

 

This is exactly my point, tough, as this very interesting discussion here shows it,

there may be interpretation problems i.e. "over-baroquisation" in a sense that is more

20th than 18th century's.

And oh, yes, I do hate Chamades, save in a baroque spanish organ (there they are intended for detail not noise). Give me a good Tuba instead please. And of course

better kept silent in Bach.

 

Best wishes,

Pierre

 

Hello, Pierre!

 

Yes, I agree and, yes, I was joking about the chamades.... probably.

 

I did once use the old Gloucester Tuba when it was in its new home (the Solo Organ of the H&H at All Saints', Margartet Street, W1). I was playing for a Chinese wedding at the time and, due to the nature of the music chosen, it was virtually impossible to avoid using it.

 

I will keep my Chamade, methinks!

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I must confess that I am not that bothered, either. There seems, to me to be a certain 'detachment' about them - as if they were almost an academic exercise, rather than an outpouring of creativity; this is not, I find, something which can be applied also to the Art of Fugue, in case anyone is wondering.
It's funny, but, to me, it's exactly the other way round: it's the AoF that I find detached and cerebral. But it's in the nature of music that we all respond individually to it - and thank goodness we do.

 

For me, the Gibbons piece would fall into the 'pleasant' and 'interesting' - and possibly 'pioneering' brackets - but 'great'? No.
I'm glad you wrote "possibly". There has been a suggestion that Gibbons composed it as a bog standard one-manual piece and that the title and manual directions are later additions made when "double organ" pieces were in fashion. It certainly doesn't feel very convincing as a two-manual piece. In any case, there are far better pieces by Gibbons: the four-part Fantasia from Parthenia for example.

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He did what??

 

:P

 

 

====================

 

 

He did see.....I promise!

 

I'll tell you what though, it is absolutely crystal clear and beautifully performed throughout.

 

I think it was just the first movement of the G-major Trio Sonata on second-thoughts.

 

MM

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====================

He did see.....I promise!

 

I'll tell you what though, it is absolutely crystal clear and beautifully performed throughout.

 

I think it was just the first movement of the G-major Trio Sonata on second-thoughts.

 

MM

 

It was. I am listening to the CD as I post this. (Pro Arte CDD315: Dueling Organs, with Lyn Larsen and Carlo Curley playing the ex-Paramount NYC Wurlitzer (Jesse Crawford's Organ) and an all electronic digital organ {no make specified but probably an Allen} ) The Bach and Widor - Intermezzo from Symphony No 6 and "that Toccata" - are all played on the Wurlitzer, with generous use of the swell pedal in the Bach!! The Wurlitzer tracks sound fine but the digital ones would hardly deceive anyone these days.

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============================

 

Part the first:

 

There may be a grain of truth in this, but this WAS Yorkshire, where folks like to fight a good fight. Even now, Yorkshiremen tend to dominate the boardrooms of London-based companies, "Aye, an' we won't 'av any women on t'board lad."

 

As for Reger being second-rate and turgid, I'm just awfully glad that those second-rate organists such as Fernando Germani, Simon Preston, Anton Heiller, David Goode, Jos van der Kooy and Melville Cook (plus most of the organ-playing/loving population of Holland) didn't or don't agree with you.

 

As for the market for second-rate, turgid music, there shouldn't be a problem.

 

God knows, people have been playing and buying recordings of Guilmant and Vierne for donkey's years.

 

:lol:

 

MM

wellll..apart from David Goode, is it really the case that Preston, Heiller, et al were/are great champions of Reger in general? - they have confined their selection to a few of his more impressive things. I have only ever heard SP play the usual bits of Op 59 and Straf mich nicht. Brian Runnett didn't play that much either - of course what he did pay was very fine indeed. . Once you're past the 'greatest hits', some of which are certainly very fine - I am extremely partial to Hallelujah Gott zu loben - what are we really left with? Erste Sonate or Zweite Suite, anyone? A great deal of R's output is pretty thin, I'm sorry to say. If only his textures were more so... I read somewhere in a sleeve note recently the assertion that all Reger's chords 'had' to have at least 12 notes in them because the thoughts they expressed were so profound. Surely not? Is profundity of thought really a function of density of texture? But, MM, I do agree with you on Guilmant and (mostly) Vierne, so I hope you'll forgive me!

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wellll..apart from David Goode, is it really the case that Preston, Heiller, et al were/are great champions of Reger in general?  - they have confined their selection to a few of his more impressive things. I have only ever heard SP play the usual bits of Op 59 and Straf mich nicht. Brian Runnett didn't play that much either - of course what he did pay was very fine indeed. . Once you're past the 'greatest hits', some of which are certainly very fine - I am extremely partial to Hallelujah Gott zu loben - what are we really left with?  Erste Sonate or Zweite Suite, anyone? A great deal of R's output is pretty thin, I'm sorry to say. If only his textures were more so... I read somewhere in a sleeve note recently  the assertion that all Reger's chords 'had' to have at least 12 notes in them because the thoughts they expressed were so profound. Surely not? Is profundity of thought really a function of density of texture? But, MM,  I do agree with you on Guilmant and (mostly) Vierne, so I hope you'll forgive me!

Bad form to reply to your own of course but I just remembered that great phrase of Felix Aprahamian's - 'Reger's gifts often ran riot in immense exaggerations'.

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wellll..apart from David Goode, is it really the case that Preston, Heiller, et al were/are great champions of Reger in general?  - they have confined their selection to a few of his more impressive things. I have only ever heard SP play the usual bits of Op 59 and Straf mich nicht. Brian Runnett didn't play that much either - of course what he did pay was very fine indeed. . Once you're past the 'greatest hits', some of which are certainly very fine - I am extremely partial to Hallelujah Gott zu loben - what are we really left with?  Erste Sonate or Zweite Suite, anyone? A great deal of R's output is pretty thin, I'm sorry to say. If only his textures were more so... I read somewhere in a sleeve note recently  the assertion that all Reger's chords 'had' to have at least 12 notes in them because the thoughts they expressed were so profound. Surely not? Is profundity of thought really a function of density of texture? But, MM,  I do agree with you on Guilmant and (mostly) Vierne, so I hope you'll forgive me!

 

======================

 

A bit thin?

 

Simon Preston only plays a couple of works?

 

Here is the complete Opus list:-

 

 

REGER ORGAN WORKS

 

Fantasia and Fugue on B-A-C-H for organ, Op. 46

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Allein Gott in der Höh' sei Ehr"), Op. 135a/2

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jesus meine Zuversicht"), Op. 135a/13

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Lobe den Herren"), Op. 135a/15

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 59

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme"), Op. 135a/25

 

Chorale Fantasia for organ ("Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme"), Op. 52/2

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland"), Op. 67/29

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Es kommt ein Schiff geladen")

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern")

 

Chorale Fantasia for organ ("Wie schön leucht't uns der Morgenstern"), Op. 40/1

 

Variations and Fugue on an Original Theme for organ in F sharp minor, Op. 73

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir"), Op. 67/3

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten"), Op. 67/47

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Ach Gott, verlaß mich nicht"), Op. 79b/1

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott"), Op. 135a/5

 

Chorale Fantasia for organ ("Ein' Feste Burg ist unser Gott"), Op. 27

 

Romance for harmonium in A minor

 

Introduction and Passacaglia for Organ in D minor

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O daß ich tausend Zungen hätte"), Op. 135a/19

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Nun danket alle Gott"), Op. 135a/18

 

Pfingsten (Pentecost), for organ, Op. 145/6

 

Monologe, pieces (12) for organ, Op. 63 No. 5, Introduktion in F-Minor

 

Monologe, pieces (12) for organ, Op. 63 No. 6, Passacaglia in F-Minor

 

Introduction, Passacaglia and Fugue for organ in E minor, Op. 127

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Macht hoch die Tür"), Op. 135a/16

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme"), Op. 67/43

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in G major, Op. 56/3

 

Weihnachten (Christmas), for organ, Op. 145/3

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Vom Himmel hoch"), Op. 135a/24

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Vom Himmel hoch"), Op. 67/42

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Nun freut euch, lieben Christen"), Op. 67/30

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jesus ist kommen"), Op. 67/20

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Lobt Gott, ihr Christen alle gleich"), Op. 67/25

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern"), Op. 67/5

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Mit Fried und Freud fahr ich dahin"), Op. 79b/10

 

Organ Sonata No. 2 in D minor, Op. 60

 

Monologe, pieces (12) for organ, Op. 63

 

Ostern (Easter), for organ, Op. 145/5

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Christ ist erstanden von dem Tod"), Op. 79b/8

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Christ ist erstanden von dem Tod")

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Erschienen ist der herrlich Tag"), Op. 67/8

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Es ist das Heil uns kommen"), Op. 135a/7

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Es ist das Heil uns kommen"), Op. 67/10

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Machs mit mir, Gott"), Op. 67/27

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott"), Op. 67/6

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Herr, wie der willst, so schicks mit mir"), Op. 67/13

 

Chorale Fantasia ("Halleluja! Gott zu loben, bleibe meine Seelenfreud"), for organ, Op. 52/3

 

Fantasia and Fugue for organ in D minor, Op. 135b

 

Suite for organ No. 1 in E minor ("Den Manen Johann Sebastian Bach"), Op. 16

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jesus meine Zuversicht"), Op. 67/22

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Christus der ist mein Leben"), Op. 79b/9

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Straf mich nicht in deinem Zorn"), Op. 67/39

 

Chorale Fantasia for organ ("Straf' mich nicht in deinem Zorn"), Op. 40/2

 

Pieces (3) for organ, Op. 7 No. 2, Fantasie on "Te Deum laudamus"

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Großer Gott, wir loben dich"), Op. 135a/10

 

Pieces (3) for organ, Op. 7 No. 3, Fuge in D minor

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Nun danket alle Gott"), Op. 79b/11

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Dir, dir, Jehova will ich singen"), Op. 67

 

Fantasia and Fugue for organ in C minor, Op. 29

 

Organ Sonata No. 1 in F sharp minor, Op. 33

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Meinem Jesum laß ich nicht"), Op. 67/26

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Gott des Himmels und der Erden"), Op. 67/12

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Herr Jesu Christ, dich zu uns wend"), Op. 135a/11

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in E major, Op. 56/1

 

Trios (6) for organ, Op. 47

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele"), Op. 67/11

 

Chorale Fantasia for organ ("Freu' dich sehr, o meine Seele"), Op. 30

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Herzlich tut mich verlangen"), Op. 67/14

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Christus der ist mein Leben"), Op. 67/5

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Welt, ich muß dich lassen"), Op. 67/34

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O wie selig seid ihr doch"), Op. 67/35

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Seelenbräutigam"), Op. 67/37

 

Suite for organ No. 2 in G minor, Op. 92

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Von Gott wil ich nicht lassen"), Op. 67/44

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier"), Op. 135a/14

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Was mein Gott will"), Op. 135a/27

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten"), Op. 135a/28

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jerusalem, du hochgebaute Stadt"), Op. 135a/12

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 59 7, Kyrie

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 59 8, Gloria

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 59 9, Benedictus

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 59 10, Capriccio

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 59 11, Melodia

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 59 12, Te Deum

 

Symphonic Fantasia and Fugue for organ, Op. 57 ("Inferno")

 

Passion (Passiontide), for organ, Op. 145/4

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden"

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden"), Op. 135a/21

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Traurigkeit, o Herzeleid")

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jesu Leiden, Pein und Tod"), Op. 67/19

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig"), Op. 67/33

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Ach bleib mit deiner Gnade"), Op. 135a/1

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Gott, du frommer Gott"), Op. 67/31

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Sollt ich meinem Gott nicht singen"), Op. 67/38

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Es ist gewißlich an der Zeit"), Op. 135a/8

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Eins ist not!"), Op. 135a/6

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Alles ist an Gottes Segen"), Op. 135a/3

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in C major, Op. 56/4

 

Postlude for organ in D minor

 

Variations and Fugue on "Heil dir im Siegerkranz" ("God Save the King") for organ

 

Trauerode (Funeral Ode), for organ, Op. 145/1

 

Siegesfeier, for organ, Op. 145/7

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 65

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in G sharp minor

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Vater unser im Himmelreich"), Op. 67/41

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan"), Op. 135a/26

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wunderbarer König"), Op. 135a/30

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Meinem Jesum laß ich nicht"), Op. 135a/17

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Gott, du frommer Gott"), Op. 135a/20

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Aus meines Herzens Grunde"), Op. 67/4

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Warum sollt ich mich denn grämen"), Op. 67/45

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan"), Op. 67/46

 

Prelude for organ in C minor

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in B minor, Op. 56/5

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in F sharp minor

 

Preludes and Fugues (4) for organ, Op. 85

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Herr, nun selbst den Wagen halt"), Op. 79b/3

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Warum sollt ich mich grämen"), Op. 79b/13

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jesu meine Freude"), Op. 67/21

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Herr, nun selbst den Wagen halt"), Op. 79b/12

 

Pieces (10) for organ, Op. 69

 

Chorale Fantasia for organ ("Alle Menschen müssen sterben"), Op. 52/1

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 80

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott"), Op. 79b/2

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Mit Fried und Freud fahr ich dahin"), Op. 79b/5

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jerusalem, du hochgebaute Stadt"), Op. 67/18

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wer weiß, wie nahe mir mein Ende"), Op. 79b/6

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Auferstehn, ja auferstehn wirst du"), Op. 79b/7

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele"), Op. 135a/9

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Jesu Christ, meins Lebens Licht"), Op. 67/32

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Komm susser Tod")

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Welt, ich muß dich lassen"), Op. 135a/22

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wer weiß, wie nahe mir mein Ende"), Op. 67/50

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wie wohl ist mir, o Freund der Seelen"), Op. 67/52

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Valet will ich dir geben"), Op. 135a/23

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Valet will ich dir geben"), Op. 67/40

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Alles ist an Gottes Segen"), Op. 67/2

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Komm, o komm, du Geist des Lebens"), Op. 67/23

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Ich will dich lieben, meine Stärke"), Op. 67/17

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele"), Op. 67/36

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten"), Op. 67/48

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in D minor

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wie schön leucht' uns der Morgenstern"), Op. 135a/29

 

Chorale Fantasia for organ ("Wie schön leucht't uns der Morgenstern"), Op. 40/1

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in C major, Op. 7/1

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in D minor, Op. 56/2

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jauchz, Erd' und Himmel, juble hell"), Op. 67/15

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Herr Jesu Christ, dich zu uns wend'"), Op. 67/9

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Werde munter, mein Gemüte"), Op. 67/49

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Morgenglanz der Ewigkeit"), Op. 79b/4

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir"), Op. 135a/4

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Ich dank' dir, lieber Herre"), Op. 67/16

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Lobe den Herren"), Op. 67/24

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Nun danket alle Gott"), Op. 67/28

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Allein Gott in der Höh' sei Ehr"), Op. 67/1

 

Pieces (9) for organ, Op. 129

 

Dankpsalm (Psalm of Thanksgiving), for organ, Op. 145/2

 

 

Phew!! A bit thin indeed.

 

I certainly don't know them all, and I possibly play only 4 of the bigger works, (including "Hallelujah! G Z L," the "Introduction & Passacaglia in d minor," the well known Toccata dn Fugue in D minor and about HALF of the big BACH ) but I DO admire the Zweite Sonate Op.60 in D-minor, the tender Intermezzo in f-minor, the magnificent Fantasia & Fugue in D-minor Op.135/b, the Dankpsalm and the Symphonic Fantasia and Fugue for organ, Op. 57 ("Inferno").

 

Simon Preston also recorded the last mentioned "Inferno" from the RFH I believe.

 

As any serious organist knows, the big Reger works require a very great deal of practise and sustained dedication, and they are therefore works which really should occupy the attention of dedicated professional performers, rather than those who have to make a living in more diverse ways, either as professional church musicians or teachers.

 

I certainly don't blame anyone for not playing many of Reger's works; especially the larger ones.

 

That stated, the miracle of modern technology DOES enable us to hear the very finest performers giving Reger their absolute best, and if David Goode springs to mind, then so too do the late Fernando Germani (who wanted to record the complete opus) and especially Paul Jacobs of Julliard fame.

 

I wonder if anyone else in the world, can play the Reger 3-part expansions of the Bach 2-part inventions.

 

However, my absolute gripe, which borders on real anger, is the fact that much, much lesser composers are revered in Britain, and whilst I admire the work enormously, I would single out Healey Willan as something of a "one trick pony" with his "Introduction, Passacaglia, Chorale & Fugue."

 

With all respect to those whom many admire, there isn't a single English composer for organ who can match up to Reger, yet they get played with nauseating regularity.

 

MM

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======================

 

 

With all respect to those whom many admire, there isn't a single English composer for organ who can match up to Reger, yet they get played with nauseating regularity.

 

MM

 

Hmmm, well Elgar is certainly at least a match for Reger as a composer: Reger never produced anything as good as Enigma (nor did most other people) but perhaps you simply want to compare compositions for organ ?

 

On my desert island, given the choice of the complete organ works of Reger or of Whitlock , Reger would be going into the sea every time. I listen to music for pleasure and amusement and neither word is an apt description of the response generated by a great deal (though by no means all) of Reger's organ works.

 

Perhaps the reasons that the English works get played with greater regularity are (1) they appeal more to those who have to play them; (2) they appeal more to the (diminishing) number of those who pay to listen to them; and (3) they are better suited to the organs available. Getting Reger to work on a good many English organs requires a great deal more effort than is needed for those who wrote with such an organ in mind. Not everyone believes in salvation through hard work : some like an easier life.

 

BAC

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However, my absolute gripe, which borders on real anger, is the fact that much, much lesser composers are revered in Britain, and whilst I admire the work enormously, I would single out Healey Willan as something of a "one trick pony" with his "Introduction, Passacaglia, Chorale & Fugue."

 

With all respect to those whom many admire, there isn't a single English composer for organ who can match up to Reger, yet they get played with nauseating regularity.

Well, I still think Tomkins, Gibbons and Byrd knock the spots off him. But it's a bit telling that I can't think of anyone more recent, so I know what you mean. Yet...

 

I once went to a conference on renaissance and medieval music at which a very well known musicologist (if you're into that sort of thing), who knew my love of Tudor music, decided to regale me with a lengthy exposition on why Josquin was a better composer than Tallis. He was clearly trying to pick an argument and soon gathered quite an audience around him. But why did he assume I disagreed? I had no problem with this: Josquin clearly was a better composer than Tallis. So I heard the chap out and replied with something (very approximately) along the lines of: "Yes indeed, I agree Josquin is far superior. He has a far more assured compositional technique, his expression is profound, his reputation was wider ...

... But I still prefer Tallis." The audience laughed and admitted I had a good point. Which it is.

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"Getting Reger to work on a good many English organs requires a great deal more effort than is needed for those who wrote with such an organ in mind."

(Quote)

 

Indeed, and it is even more difficult on a french organ.

I think both british and french organs (the romantic ones) are more

develloped on the "Power" side, relying more on the Swellbox for the ppp

than the german by far.

For Reger you need soft stops -but clear, firm, polyphonic ones- and very

precise, fat-less 16' Pedal flues.

On a french or belgian organ the first reed you add you may forget about

anything else than chords or simple melody, but you cannot use the Mixtures

without them. So for a big fugue with an huge crescendo.....Forget it.

 

Best wishes,

Pierre

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======================

 

A bit thin?

 

Simon Preston only plays a couple of works?

 

Here is the complete Opus list:-

REGER ORGAN WORKS

 

Fantasia and Fugue on B-A-C-H for organ, Op. 46

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Allein Gott in der Höh' sei Ehr"), Op. 135a/2

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jesus meine Zuversicht"), Op. 135a/13

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Lobe den Herren"), Op. 135a/15

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 59

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme"), Op. 135a/25

 

Chorale Fantasia for organ ("Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme"), Op. 52/2

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland"), Op. 67/29

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Es kommt ein Schiff geladen")

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern")

 

Chorale Fantasia for organ ("Wie schön leucht't uns der Morgenstern"), Op. 40/1

 

Variations and Fugue on an Original Theme for organ in F sharp minor, Op. 73

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir"), Op. 67/3

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten"), Op. 67/47

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Ach Gott, verlaß mich nicht"), Op. 79b/1

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott"), Op. 135a/5

 

Chorale Fantasia for organ ("Ein' Feste Burg ist unser Gott"), Op. 27

 

Romance for harmonium in A minor

 

Introduction and Passacaglia for Organ in D minor

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O daß ich tausend Zungen hätte"), Op. 135a/19

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Nun danket alle Gott"), Op. 135a/18

 

Pfingsten (Pentecost), for organ, Op. 145/6

 

Monologe, pieces (12) for organ, Op. 63 No. 5, Introduktion in F-Minor

 

Monologe, pieces (12) for organ, Op. 63 No. 6, Passacaglia in F-Minor

 

Introduction, Passacaglia and Fugue for organ in E minor, Op. 127

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Macht hoch die Tür"), Op. 135a/16

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme"), Op. 67/43

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in G major, Op. 56/3

 

Weihnachten (Christmas), for organ, Op. 145/3

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Vom Himmel hoch"), Op. 135a/24

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Vom Himmel hoch"), Op. 67/42

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Nun freut euch, lieben Christen"), Op. 67/30

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jesus ist kommen"), Op. 67/20

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Lobt Gott, ihr Christen alle gleich"), Op. 67/25

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern"), Op. 67/5

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Mit Fried und Freud fahr ich dahin"), Op. 79b/10

 

Organ Sonata No. 2 in D minor, Op. 60

 

Monologe, pieces (12) for organ, Op. 63

 

Ostern (Easter), for organ, Op. 145/5

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Christ ist erstanden von dem Tod"), Op. 79b/8

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Christ ist erstanden von dem Tod")

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Erschienen ist der herrlich Tag"), Op. 67/8

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Es ist das Heil uns kommen"), Op. 135a/7

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Es ist das Heil uns kommen"), Op. 67/10

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Machs mit mir, Gott"), Op. 67/27

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott"), Op. 67/6

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Herr, wie der willst, so schicks mit mir"), Op. 67/13

 

Chorale Fantasia ("Halleluja! Gott zu loben, bleibe meine Seelenfreud"), for organ, Op. 52/3

 

Fantasia and Fugue for organ in D minor, Op. 135b

 

Suite for organ No. 1 in E minor ("Den Manen Johann Sebastian Bach"), Op. 16

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jesus meine Zuversicht"), Op. 67/22

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Christus der ist mein Leben"), Op. 79b/9

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Straf mich nicht in deinem Zorn"), Op. 67/39

 

Chorale Fantasia for organ ("Straf' mich nicht in deinem Zorn"), Op. 40/2

 

Pieces (3) for organ, Op. 7 No. 2, Fantasie on "Te Deum laudamus"

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Großer Gott, wir loben dich"), Op. 135a/10

 

Pieces (3) for organ, Op. 7 No. 3, Fuge in D minor

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Nun danket alle Gott"), Op. 79b/11

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Dir, dir, Jehova will ich singen"), Op. 67

 

Fantasia and Fugue for organ in C minor, Op. 29

 

Organ Sonata No. 1 in F sharp minor, Op. 33

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Meinem Jesum laß ich nicht"), Op. 67/26

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Gott des Himmels und der Erden"), Op. 67/12

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Herr Jesu Christ, dich zu uns wend"), Op. 135a/11

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in E major, Op. 56/1

 

Trios (6) for organ, Op. 47

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele"), Op. 67/11

 

Chorale Fantasia for organ ("Freu' dich sehr, o meine Seele"), Op. 30

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Herzlich tut mich verlangen"), Op. 67/14

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Christus der ist mein Leben"), Op. 67/5

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Welt, ich muß dich lassen"), Op. 67/34

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O wie selig seid ihr doch"), Op. 67/35

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Seelenbräutigam"), Op. 67/37

 

Suite for organ No. 2 in G minor, Op. 92

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Von Gott wil ich nicht lassen"), Op. 67/44

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier"), Op. 135a/14

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Was mein Gott will"), Op. 135a/27

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten"), Op. 135a/28

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jerusalem, du hochgebaute Stadt"), Op. 135a/12

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 59 7, Kyrie

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 59 8, Gloria

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 59 9, Benedictus

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 59 10, Capriccio

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 59 11, Melodia

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 59 12, Te Deum

 

Symphonic Fantasia and Fugue for organ, Op. 57 ("Inferno")

 

Passion (Passiontide), for organ, Op. 145/4

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden"

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden"), Op. 135a/21

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Traurigkeit, o Herzeleid")

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jesu Leiden, Pein und Tod"), Op. 67/19

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig"), Op. 67/33

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Ach bleib mit deiner Gnade"), Op. 135a/1

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Gott, du frommer Gott"), Op. 67/31

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Sollt ich meinem Gott nicht singen"), Op. 67/38

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Es ist gewißlich an der Zeit"), Op. 135a/8

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Eins ist not!"), Op. 135a/6

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Alles ist an Gottes Segen"), Op. 135a/3

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in C major, Op. 56/4

 

Postlude for organ in D minor

 

Variations and Fugue on "Heil dir im Siegerkranz" ("God Save the King") for organ

 

Trauerode (Funeral Ode), for organ, Op. 145/1

 

Siegesfeier, for organ, Op. 145/7

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 65

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in G sharp minor

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Vater unser im Himmelreich"), Op. 67/41

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan"), Op. 135a/26

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wunderbarer König"), Op. 135a/30

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Meinem Jesum laß ich nicht"), Op. 135a/17

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Gott, du frommer Gott"), Op. 135a/20

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Aus meines Herzens Grunde"), Op. 67/4

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Warum sollt ich mich denn grämen"), Op. 67/45

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan"), Op. 67/46

 

Prelude for organ in C minor

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in B minor, Op. 56/5

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in F sharp minor

 

Preludes and Fugues (4) for organ, Op. 85

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Herr, nun selbst den Wagen halt"), Op. 79b/3

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Warum sollt ich mich grämen"), Op. 79b/13

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jesu meine Freude"), Op. 67/21

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Herr, nun selbst den Wagen halt"), Op. 79b/12

 

Pieces (10) for organ, Op. 69

 

Chorale Fantasia for organ ("Alle Menschen müssen sterben"), Op. 52/1

 

Pieces (12) for organ, Op. 80

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott"), Op. 79b/2

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Mit Fried und Freud fahr ich dahin"), Op. 79b/5

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jerusalem, du hochgebaute Stadt"), Op. 67/18

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wer weiß, wie nahe mir mein Ende"), Op. 79b/6

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Auferstehn, ja auferstehn wirst du"), Op. 79b/7

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele"), Op. 135a/9

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Jesu Christ, meins Lebens Licht"), Op. 67/32

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Komm susser Tod")

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("O Welt, ich muß dich lassen"), Op. 135a/22

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wer weiß, wie nahe mir mein Ende"), Op. 67/50

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wie wohl ist mir, o Freund der Seelen"), Op. 67/52

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Valet will ich dir geben"), Op. 135a/23

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Valet will ich dir geben"), Op. 67/40

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Alles ist an Gottes Segen"), Op. 67/2

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Komm, o komm, du Geist des Lebens"), Op. 67/23

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Ich will dich lieben, meine Stärke"), Op. 67/17

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele"), Op. 67/36

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten"), Op. 67/48

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in D minor

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Wie schön leucht' uns der Morgenstern"), Op. 135a/29

 

Chorale Fantasia for organ ("Wie schön leucht't uns der Morgenstern"), Op. 40/1

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in C major, Op. 7/1

 

Prelude and Fugue for organ in D minor, Op. 56/2

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Jauchz, Erd' und Himmel, juble hell"), Op. 67/15

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Herr Jesu Christ, dich zu uns wend'"), Op. 67/9

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Werde munter, mein Gemüte"), Op. 67/49

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Morgenglanz der Ewigkeit"), Op. 79b/4

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir"), Op. 135a/4

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Ich dank' dir, lieber Herre"), Op. 67/16

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Lobe den Herren"), Op. 67/24

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Nun danket alle Gott"), Op. 67/28

 

Chorale Prelude for organ ("Allein Gott in der Höh' sei Ehr"), Op. 67/1

 

Pieces (9) for organ, Op. 129

 

Dankpsalm (Psalm of Thanksgiving), for organ, Op. 145/2

Phew!!  A bit thin indeed.

 

I certainly don't know them all, and I possibly play only 4 of the bigger works, (including "Hallelujah! G Z L," the "Introduction & Passacaglia in d minor," the well known Toccata dn Fugue in D minor and about HALF of the big BACH ) but I DO admire the Zweite Sonate Op.60 in D-minor, the tender Intermezzo in f-minor, the magnificent Fantasia & Fugue in D-minor Op.135/b, the Dankpsalm and the Symphonic Fantasia and Fugue for organ, Op. 57 ("Inferno").

 

Simon Preston also recorded the last mentioned  "Inferno" from the RFH I believe.

 

As any serious organist knows, the big Reger works require a very great deal of practise and sustained dedication, and they are therefore works which really should occupy the attention of dedicated professional performers, rather than those who have to make a living in more diverse ways, either as professional church musicians or teachers.

 

I certainly don't blame anyone for not playing many of Reger's works; especially the larger ones.

 

That stated, the miracle of modern technology DOES enable us to hear the very finest performers giving Reger their absolute best, and if David Goode springs to mind, then so too do the late Fernando Germani (who wanted to record the complete opus) and especially Paul Jacobs of Julliard fame.

 

I wonder if anyone else in the world, can play the Reger 3-part expansions of the Bach 2-part inventions.

 

However, my absolute gripe, which borders on real anger, is the fact that much, much lesser composers are revered in Britain, and whilst I admire the work enormously, I would single out Healey Willan as something of a "one trick pony" with his "Introduction, Passacaglia, Chorale & Fugue."

 

With all respect to those whom many admire, there isn't a single English composer for organ who can match up to Reger, yet they get played with nauseating regularity.

 

MM

MM - we can agree on two things at least - the Willan 's overrated, and there's not very much really good English repertoire. But after that I think we'll have to agree to disagree, I hope amicably...I learnt quite a few of the bigger Reger pieces (I had to play the Second Sonata for a competition), and have never returned to them - I hated every minute! It's nothing to do with how hard his pieces are, or lack of time to work on them. The problem for me is the effort/reward ratio, I think, but I know that's not the same for others - I just happen to find other kinds of chtechnical challenge more rewarding. The concept of Reger adding a superfluous part to the unimprovable work of a far greater composer is for me emblematic of why I can't 'do ' Reger. How hard the result might be to play doesn't make it any more worthwhile...

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MM - we can agree on two things at least - the Willan 's overrated, and there's not very much really good English repertoire. But after that I think we'll have to agree to disagree, I hope amicably...I learnt quite a few of the bigger Reger pieces (I had to play the Second Sonata for a competition), and have never returned to them - I hated every minute! It's nothing to do with how hard his pieces are, or lack of time to work on them. The problem for me is the effort/reward ratio, I think, but I know that's not the same for others - I just happen to find other kinds of chtechnical challenge more rewarding.  The concept  of Reger adding a superfluous part to the unimprovable work of a far greater composer is for me emblematic of why I can't  'do ' Reger. How hard the result might be to play doesn't make it any more worthwhile...

 

=========================

 

I'm sure we can remain entirely amicable Stephen. We are all entirely different creatures, and for my own part, I don't think I have ever enjoyed a single moment of Rheinberger's music, which many people rave about.

 

I recall thinking that I could have drained Lake Constance with a bucket in the time it took a recitalist to plough the three "Pastels" by Karg-Elert.

 

As I once said to a fellow organist, "It is music which often draws people to the organ, and organ-music which often drives people to drink."

 

Poor Reger knew all about THAT......unless it was "her indoors."

 

MM

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"Getting Reger to work on a good many English organs requires a great deal more effort than is needed for those who wrote with such an organ in mind."

(Quote)

 

Indeed, and it is even more difficult on a french organ.

I think both british and french organs (the romantic ones) are more

develloped on the "Power" side, relying more on the Swellbox for the ppp

than the german by far.

For Reger you need soft stops -but clear, firm, polyphonic ones- and very

precise, fat-less 16' Pedal flues.

On a french or belgian organ the first reed you add you may forget about

anything else than chords or simple melody, but you cannot use the Mixtures

without them. So for a big fugue with an huge crescendo.....Forget it.

 

Best wishes,

Pierre

 

============================

 

Interestingly, I can't think of ANY romantic organ in the UK on which Reger could be played really effectively as per the composer's intentions....certainly not the Doncaster and Armley instruments; though the former would be more suitable than the latter.

 

Magnificent though the Schulze sound is, and whilst there is a wealth of very beautiful softer registers, one could never describe the Hauptwerk (Great) choruses as "subtle" on either instrument; thus bringing us back to the question of the cone-chests and schweller control so vital to Reger.

 

In an odd sort of way, as at Sint Bavo, it is an organ such as that in the RFH which actually survives the ordeal of Reger best, but only after a great deal of careful thought. The English and French penchant for outright power is so very different to the homogenous (if rather clouded) build-up found in later romantic German instruments, and with all their delicate voices, the Schulze organs just aren't right somehow.

 

That said, I suspect that with help, it would be possible to perform Reger VERY successfully on the organ of Sydney Town Hall, which in effect rather than concept, is not that very different to the Bavo-orgel, even allowing for the 150 year gap! As with Walcker organs, both instruments belong to the classical-tradition (the Sydney instrument perhaps unwittingly so), but with an emphasis on the "Sturm und Drang" which so anticipated full-blooded romanticism.

 

I suspect that Reger doesn't travel outside Germany too well, unless it is to America!

 

MM

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Schulze's are Northern german romantic organs, while Walcker's

were Southern ; the difference is as big as during the baroque

period!

The actual areas are slightly different tough: "northern", in the romantic period,

means centre-north, southern rather south-west.

Schulze-Ladegast-Jehmlich are the Mendelssohn and Rheinberger organs plus Liszt.

Walcker -Sauer (tough easterner actually)-Link-Weigle-Steinmeyer are the true Reger's organs.

Pierre

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Schulze's are Northern german romantic organs, while Walcker's

were Southern ; the difference is as big as during the baroque

period!

The actual areas are slightly different tough: "northern", in the romantic period,

means centre-north, southern rather south-west.

Schulze-Ladegast-Jehmlich are the Mendelssohn and Rheinberger organs plus Liszt.

Walcker -Sauer (tough easterner actually)-Link-Weigle-Steinmeyer are the true Reger's organs.

Pierre

 

=====================

 

Indeed Pierre, and this explains my comment about America, for it was the Southern German influence of Walcker which so inspired American organ-builders in the early romantic days, and even G.Donald-Harrison.

 

I've also re-thought the bit about the suitability of UK organs to the music of Reger, as I had overlooked the work of Compton, which although largely extension organs, have a certain homogeneity in the tonal design and a certain absence of booming basses.

 

In fact, I was quite satisfied with the sounds I found for Reger, at St.Bride's, FleetStreet; but it does have quite a large specification to play around with.

 

MM

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Indeed; take Hilborne Roosevelt for instance.

I have here a catalogue from him in which he made no

apology for having been inspired by the Boston Walcker.

The german was the working language in the workshop,

as well as in Skinner's.

Donald Harrison is an interesting case; it seems the influences

on him were rather complex. Former Willis employee, but influenced

by Lewis; the "german connection" may have been there, trough

Schulze's influence on Lewis rather than in the US self.

But what is really amazing is the quite parralel evolution of taste

everywhere.

Take a 1950 belgian Delmotte (a provincial builder) it's not that different

from Harrison's ideas, up to the quint chorus mixtures without "full blast"

treatment and softer in the treble. The same by Klais, Gonzalez...

The history of the organ shows, behind the ever and fast changing

fashions, much continuity, and global but slow moves.

Fashions are the trees that hide the forest, but from Casparini

round 1700 up to Donald Harrison round 1950 you can follow a

logical path that binds a tradition.

Best wishes,

Pierre

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Indeed; take Hilborne Roosevelt for instance.

I have here a catalogue from him in which he made no

apology for having been inspired by the Boston Walcker.

The german was the working language in the workshop,

as well as in Skinner's.

Donald Harrison is an interesting case; it seems the influences

on him were rather complex. Former Willis employee, but influenced

by Lewis; the "german connection" may have been there, trough

Schulze's influence on Lewis rather than in the US self.

But what is really amazing is the quite parralel evolution of taste

everywhere.

Take a 1950 belgian Delmotte (a provincial builder) it's not that different

from Harrison's ideas, up to the quint chorus mixtures without "full blast"

treatment and softer in the treble. The same by Klais, Gonzalez...

The history of the organ shows, behind the ever and fast changing

fashions, much continuity, and global but slow moves.

Fashions are the trees that hide the forest, but from Casparini

round 1700 up to Donald Harrison round 1950 you can follow a

logical path that binds a tradition.

Best wishes,

Pierre

 

 

============================

 

G Donald-Harrison re-built the Walcker at Methuen did he not?

 

Of course, he probably ruined it by adding "improved" reeds, but it's still a magnificent sound.

 

MM

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============================

 

G Donald-Harrison re-built the Walcker at Methuen did he not?

 

Of course, he probably ruined it by adding "improved" reeds, but it's still a magnificent sound.

 

MM

 

Yes -with a young Aeolian-Skinner employee, a certain Lawrence.

Lawrence Phelps-

A Walcker it is no more, rather an excellent American classic one; a keeper

anyway. 1948 organs will be historic too.

Not only the reeds were changed, the Diapason choruses were entirely new

and/or revoiced, with that typical bite.

Let us hope it will survive trough the unavoidable purgatory any organ style

has to endeavour; but to us "romantic guys" the american classic organ has

already its place among the historic genuine styles.

Pierre

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