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Lewis Organ For Sale


Barry Jordan
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Hello all,

 

I see Ladach has a three-manual Lewis for sale.

 

Anyone know his comes from? I'd love to have it but don't quite know where to put it.

 

http://www.ladach.de/index.php?id=o_orgeln...all&rv=1&rb=56#

 

Cheers

Barry

 

 

=========================

 

 

Isn't this the organ we discussed not long ago?

 

I recall it may be in-situ in a Congregational Church (URC) somewhere, and has been silent for about 20 years.

 

I seem to recall that Tony Newham knew about it.

 

MM

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=========================

Isn't this the organ we discussed not long ago?

 

I recall it may be in-situ in a Congregational Church (URC) somewhere, and has been silent for about 20 years.

 

I seem to recall that Tony Newham knew about it.

 

MM

 

Hi

 

Not guilty! I know nothing of this organ - and someone else did the last NPOR update. Also, the picture looks like a an Anglican or Catholic church, not a URC (but that's generallities, not specific!

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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Hi

 

Not guilty!  I know nothing of this organ - and someone else did the last NPOR update.  Also, the picture looks like a an Anglican or Catholic church, not a URC (but that's generallities, not specific!

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

 

I've already put up the relevant reference from NPOR in an earlier post: the Lewis is/was in Bury (Congregational) URC Church, which was certainly being sold last year when we were first contacted about it. We looked after it until they stopped using it over twenty years ago. It's all pneumatic and would need re-tubing completely if it were going to be "Restored".

 

Rev. Tony is right though, the building was rather Anglican in its architecture and decoration. A fine building and another sad loss.

 

David Wyld

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Hi

 

Not guilty! I know nothing of this organ - and someone else did the last NPOR update. Also, the picture looks like a an Anglican or Catholic church, not a URC (but that's generallities, not specific!

 

=====================

 

One of the great mysteries for me, is how the Congregational Church didn't totally eclipse all the other non-conformist churches.

 

At a critical time in English history, they seemed to attract the great liberal thinkers and businessmen of the day. The hymnody was second to none, they had sung psalms, often very fine organs, some spectacular architecture and a certain depth in their forms of worship, Indeed, wasn't Dr.Gauntlett one of those who went around teaching psalm-singing and encouraging good music in the Congregational Church?

 

As a youngster, I often went into the great Congregational Churches; the architecture ranging from "standard chapel" to almost "high catholic" in style, but even then, the decline in Congregational fortunes was all too obvious, as they became early victims of changing tastes and religious sensibilities.

 

I don't know whether Tony Newham has ever visited the URC at Ashton-under-Lyne (Albion Church), but this is a hugely impressive piece of architecture with the most wonderful oak, hammer-beam roof and a magnificent 4-manual Lewis organ in "more or less" orginal condition.

 

MM

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Hi

 

Not guilty! I know nothing of this organ - and someone else did the last NPOR update. Also, the picture looks like a an Anglican or Catholic church, not a URC (but that's generallities, not specific!

 

=====================

 

One of the great mysteries for me, is how the Congregational Church didn't totally eclipse all the other non-conformist churches.

 

At a critical time in English history, they seemed to attract the great liberal thinkers and businessmen of the day. The hymnody was second to none, they had sung psalms, often very fine organs, some spectacular architecture and a certain depth in their forms of worship, Indeed, wasn't Dr.Gauntlett one of those who went around teaching psalm-singing and encouraging good music in the Congregational Church?

 

As a youngster, I often went into the great Congregational Churches; the architecture ranging from "standard chapel" to almost "high catholic" in style, but even then, the decline in Congregational fortunes was all too obvious, as they became early victims of changing tastes and religious sensibilities.

 

I don't know whether Tony Newham has ever visited the URC at Ashton-under-Lyne (Albion Church), but this is a hugely impressive piece of architecture with the most wonderful oak, hammer-beam roof and a magnificent 4-manual Lewis organ in "more or less" orginal condition.

 

MM

 

Hi

 

I've not seen the church you mention - but I have seen a number of Congregational churches (mainly in the South) and the only one that isn't relatively plain is Folkestone.

 

By their nature, Congregationally-governed churches vary greatly (no hierarchy to dictate how thngs should be!) so I'm not suprised that some are very Anglican - but the fact remains that most are "preaching houses" with a central pulpit, and the organ often centre front.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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