Jump to content
Mander Organ Builders Forum

Recommended Posts

Catching up on my reading, I have finally reached volume 40 of the BIOS Journal - 2016. In it, there is a very interesting article about the organ music of T Tertius Noble of York Minster and St Thomas Fifth Avenue fame. I have virtually no organ music by him - there's the piece in the Novello Canterbury Album, a couple of bits and pieces in IMSLP and then I picked a Choral Prelude on Melcombe on eBay a few years back. I am very keen to get hold of a copy of his piece Autumn written in 1932 but publish by Schmidt in the USA. I am sorry that this request also appears on the 'other site' but I just wonder if anyone here can assist. It seems that a lot of his pieces that were published by Schmidt were taken up by OUP and published over here, but, sadly for me, only those written between 1923 and 1927. Can anyone help? If anyone has copies of his other choral preludes especially those on well-known tunes, I would be very interested in seeing copies. Many thanks in keen anticipation of your help!

Martin.

Link to post
Share on other sites

John Scott Whiteley has recorded Autumn. (Naxos) Have you thought of contacting him. I suspect he might have quite a number of the Choral Preludes too! And if he hasn't he might be able to point you in the right direction.

You could even try speaking to FJ who, I have always found to be most accommodating!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Tertius Noble also composed and published in two volumes of 100 and 50 respectively “Free organ accompaniments to well-known hymns” for use in this country.  I haven’t seen them, but they seem to be readily available.  After moving to St Thomas’, New York he published a similar edition based on hymn tunes used in America, which I have. Some inevitably overlap: examples Breslau, Bangor, Stuttgart, Hanover, Adeste Fideles, “Hark the Herald“, St Anne, Eventide, etc., and some familiar hymns and carols in their American tunes and settings, e.g., “O little town of Bethlehem”, our National Anthem as “My country ‘tis of thee” and, inevitably, his own “Ora Labora” of which a former Rector of St Thomas’ said it “is sung all over America”. 

Several pieces are extended and can be used as a short prelude or interlude, e.g., “In Babilone”.  They vary in difficulty, but all are very fine.

Unfortunately I can’t quote the publisher details for the American edition.  Having had the house upside down trying to find it yesterday, I think I must have left it at church where I last played in February.

Noble achieved respect and recognition in America.  “An Episcopal Dictionary of the Church” (from the official website of the Episcopal Church in America) contains a half-page about him.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Many thanks for these ideas, folks. I'm a bit reticent about contacting JSW to ask a favour like that. Why, I can't help but feel, should he want to fiddle about with a scanner - assuming he has one - for someone he's never heard of and is unlikely to be in need of a favour returned?

Good to see reference above to 'Ora Labora' - not a tune I knew until I was having a rummage on the St Thomas website (or, more likely youTube) one day and found a recording of it accompanied by Gerre Hancock who then went on to improvise a voluntary on it - I think it might have been his last service at St Thomas. OK - here it is - worth a listen. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a fine arrangement of Ora Labora in the "Love Divine" hymn-anthem booklet published by the Church Music Society and OUP - we sang it for Harvest last week. It also includes Maurice Bevan's wonderful Corvedale ("There's a wideness...") and a Howells rarity, so a good buy all round, plus a (to my mind slightly unconvincing) Francis Jackson hymn.

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/love-divine-9780193953697?cc=gb&lang=en&

Link to post
Share on other sites

“Ora labora” is awesome. With the text of “Come, labour on” it’s a real tear-jerker - in the very best sense of the word.

Its in New English Praise (as is “Corvedale”), and has a fine descant added by Simon Lindley.

For the last few years this has been a firm fixture for our final Evensong of the choir year.

(“Servant[s], well done!”) 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course it’s not unknown for later composers to substitute their own descant in place of the original composer’s, although some contributors on earlier threads here have disapproved of such things!  It may be that there was a copyright issue in this case.  I don’t know whether ‘Ora Labora’ appeared in the UK Volumes of “Free organ accompaniments to well-known hymns” by Tertius Noble.  His own descant in the US version is very fine.  I wish I could track down the publisher’s details.   

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure whether or not this will be much help, but my copies of the 50 and 100 Free Organ Accompaniments are published by Alfred Publishing Co, Inc in the USA - "alfred.com" (who have been assigned all rights by the original publisher, J. Fischer & Bro.).  For what it's worth, my copies arrived within a few days of my ordering them from Amazon UK!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...