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Organ music to accompany your COVID-19 immunisation


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What a wonderful way to receive a life-saving immunisation against this dreadful virus!

The nave of Salisbury Cathedral has been converted into a mass COVID-19 vaccination centre and a program of organ music has been arranged while people have their vaccinations. If you had the choice what would you like to be listening to at the time (and a certain fail for anyone who dares to suggest a particular set of variations by Sweelinck)?

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9 hours ago, Contrabombarde said:

What a wonderful way to receive a life-saving immunisation against this dreadful virus!

 (and a certain fail for anyone who dares to suggest a particular set of variations by Sweelinck)?

I presume you mean the ones about a young man that I was once asked to play for the funeral of a 90+ year old man!

Every Blessing

Tony

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5 hours ago, Tony Newnham said:

I presume you mean the ones about a young man that I was once asked to play for the funeral of a 90+ year old man!

Every Blessing

Tony

I’ve played those variations without shame at the funerals of many older people including my 85-year-old Dad. Even the oldest amongst us are young in comparison to the life of many church buildings and organs, oak trees, mountains and rivers. It’s cool. And the music is wonderful.

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Good method of musically educating a captive audience whilst waiting patiently to get stabbed.

Reckon most of the " congregation " would prefer something a bit more along the lines of  what is commonly referred to as   " twangy bangy ".

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I'd go for one of my favourites: Flor Peeters, Lied to the Flowers.

A particularly peaceful and pleasant piece to keep people awaiting the jab nice and calm.  (Although if it's like the flu jab it's nothing to worry about.)

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16 hours ago, Adnosad said:

Reckon most of the " congregation " would prefer something a bit more along the lines of  what is commonly referred to as   " twangy bangy ".

Really!! How do you know this?

Or is it, yet another, case of the superior organist looking down his nose at the general public!! No wonder organists have such a bad reputation!!!!

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Sounds like a good opportunity for the local organists to have a bit of fun and play something light-hearted. That should help lighten the mood and put a few smiles on faces. Perhaps they can take requests. After all, where I live here in Holland there are a couple of carillons (Voorburg and The Hague) from which weekly recitals are given. You're as likely to hear tunes from the Beatles or some prog rock as you are Sweelinck or other such worthies, and it's nice to see the smiles on the faces of people, me included, who finally recognise a familiar ditty on an unfamiliar instrument. And where cathedrals are concerned, there are few paces with better all-round musicians.

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Sad to say that I am one of the few who did not know the meaning of twangy bangy; assumed it must refer to guitars and drums, and so did a Google search.  Up came a video of the Neary family, Martin’s ‘cellist daughter Alice and his grandchildren doing their twangy bangy thing.  I may have related this story before.  My local association went to Geneva where our kind host was Lionel Rogg at the Victoria Hall.  This coincided with the late Queen Mother’s 100th birthday the following day.  We gathered outside St Peter’s Cathedral, and Lionel Rogg was seen emerging from a doorway at roof level, at least 100 feet above, and entering another to perform as carillonneur: his programme, the British National Anthem followed by ‘Happy Birthday’ and the two then combined in an inverted fugue.  A brilliant performance for us and the doubtless surprised citizens of Geneva.

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Oh gosh. I used to play that in the school chapel after morning assembly the late 1960s. {Possibly not quite so well or using such a good arrangement...}

Themes from the Magic Roundabout used to feature on occasions. I don't think that the Head would have known what the Magic Roundabout was or even what a TV might have been.

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David Halls and John Challenger were interviewed live on BBC Breakfast a few days ago at 6.50am. Unfortunately the attempt to broadcast John playing Bach’s Air in D was of less than stellar audio quality. 
 

Of the witter suggestions I have heard, Paul Ayres’ Toccata on “All you need(le) is Love” and Fauré’s “Cantique de Jean Vaccine” are worth sharing! 

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On 18/01/2021 at 13:34, undamaris said:

I was always led to believe that "bang and twang" was what some people call country and western music!

And what's wrong with Country & Western music? 🤣
[Ducking and running for cover....]

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  • 2 months later...

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