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Maccabeus / See, the conqu’ring hero comes


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There is a Festival March by A.D. Miller in the Oxford Hymn Settings volume for Easter and Ascension. I haven’t actually played it, but looking at it, doesn’t appear too difficult (easier than the Guilmant anyway). It’s about half the length of the Guilmant, and looks quite fun, with sections in 5/8 and 7/8. It does, however, call for an En chamade Trompette, which you may not have available. 

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I'm sure Dr Miller wouldn't mind if a Tuba (or similar) were used. Not all organists have four instruments on which to play in their house of worship - and it looks as if there is an en chamade reed on only one.

He has also done this rather fun shortie [Ride On, Ride on In Majesty arr. A. D. Miller - YouTube], for the Sunday before.

I could not find a performance on an organ.

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I suppose it depends on what you have available to you.

Thinking of the old organ of St. Chad's Cathedral in Birmingham with its deafening en chamade (now in Monmouth Parish church - I'd be interested to know what it sounds like in there!) and John Pryer, the present Organiste Honoraire I can imagine a splendid improvisation.

But, I suppose that also depends on your improvisation skills - and you've got almost five weeks to think about it!!! 

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Thank you for these suggestions. We have a suitably noisy reed on the Solo here (not en chamade but more that sort of sound than a Tuba).

I know the Miller Winchester New piece and shall probably play it on Palm Sunday.

I was wondering about an improvisation, as I could only think of the Guilmant and didn’t quite fancy that. But it also struck me as a bit odd that such a splendid tune should have had so little use made of it, or was that just my ignorance? Hence my enquiry.

In some ways an improvisation would be better as an introduction to Mass - easier to manage the timings. Perhaps beginning slow and mysterious à la Messiaen to express the quiet of the garden in the early morning but also the hiddenness and mystery of the Resurrection; then building from that to end with a fanfare as the clergy enter and ending with full organ. Hmmm. Has potential ....

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