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Vox Humana

Borrow In G

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Has anyone here come across the infamous Frank Borrow Mag and Nunc? I had the (dubious) pleasure of playing it last week. I just know I've heard the bit at "and my spirit hath rejoiced" before somewhere, but for the life of me I can't place it - and none of the choir I was with could either. Similarly the passage in the Nunc where it splits into eight parts. Can anyone help me out?

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Just bumping this up.

 

It would seem that the setting is not well known, but someone may have come across it and know the answers.

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With difficulty, I fear. I think you probably have to know Mr Borrow, or "the right people". My copy came in a roundabout way for a particular performance and I was specifically asked to respect the copyright. One should always respect copyright anyway, but in this instance it could be a particularly delicate issue (perhaps). In any case my copy is an electronic file of nearly 12mb so it doesn't really lend itself to dissemination. Sorry this is a bit of a lame reply.

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With difficulty, I fear. I think you probably have to know Mr Borrow, or "the right people". My copy came in a roundabout way for a particular performance and I was specifically asked to respect the copyright. One should always respect copyright anyway, but in this instance it could be a particularly delicate issue (perhaps). In any case my copy is an electronic file of nearly 12mb so it doesn't really lend itself to dissemination. Sorry this is a bit of a lame reply.

Just noticed this thread and realised that I had somehow missed VH's original post of last year on this topic. I don't think the publisher of Borrow's recently-discovered complete works would object to my quoting from the editorial note to the Evening Service in G:

"Frank Borrow (1898-1996) was Master of the Music at the Priory Church of St Winifred, Little Worth, from the age of 17 until his death. He was a prolific but rather secretive composer, writing his music on the back of old service sheets using invisible ink. The extent of his composition only became apparent following a fire in the vestry shortly after his death, when the warmth of the flames revealed some of the ink at the top of a pile of papers stacked in a corner. These papers were rescued by the churchwardens and were found to contain a large quantity of fine music. The Great Service, from which this Magnificat & Nunc Dimittis is taken, is dedicated to Noah Vale, his great friend and the landlord of his favourite hostelry. Like much of Borrow’s music, it reveals consummate craftsmanship and a musical language that is subtly allusive."

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Guest Cynic
Just noticed this thread and realised that I had somehow missed VH's original post of last year on this topic. I don't think the publisher of Borrow's recently-discovered complete works would object to my quoting from the editorial note to the Evening Service in G:

"Frank Borrow (1898-1996) was Master of the Music at the Priory Church of St Winifred, Little Worth, from the age of 17 until his death. He was a prolific but rather secretive composer, writing his music on the back of old service sheets using invisible ink. The extent of his composition only became apparent following a fire in the vestry shortly after his death, when the warmth of the flames revealed some of the ink at the top of a pile of papers stacked in a corner. These papers were rescued by the churchwardens and were found to contain a large quantity of fine music. The Great Service, from which this Magnificat & Nunc Dimittis is taken, is dedicated to Noah Vale, his great friend and the landlord of his favourite hostelry. Like much of Borrow’s music, it reveals consummate craftsmanship and a musical language that is subtly allusive."

 

 

No disrespect intended, but this reads like an April 1st effort. Especially the wonderful phrase

"writing his music on the back of old service sheets using invisible ink" !!!

 

The question is, bearing in mind the earlier posting esp. 'dubious pleasure'

is it any good? I also love the expression 'subtly allusive' which hints that not unlike a well-known stage composer, born of illustrious musical stock, dear Mr.Borrow occasionally borrows ideas.

 

The thought occurs to me: did Mr.Borrow leave us any organ literature? I would genuinely be interested to know. I am building up a programme of just such composers. Among others, I have works lined up by such greats as Oliphant Chuckerbutty, Gerhard Krapf, Samuel Scheidt and Jacques-Louis Battmann.

All together now

//:na-na na-na na-na na-na://

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Guest Cynic
No disrespect intended, but this reads like an April 1st effort. Especially the wonderful phrase

"writing his music on the back of old service sheets using invisible ink" !!!

 

The question is, bearing in mind the earlier posting esp. 'dubious pleasure'

is it any good? I also love the expression 'subtly allusive' which hints that not unlike a well-known stage composer, born of illustrious musical stock, dear Mr.Borrow occasionally borrows ideas.

 

The thought occurs to me: did Mr.Borrow leave us any organ literature? I would genuinely be interested to know. I am building up a programme of just such composers. Among others, I have works lined up by such greats as Oliphant Chuckerbutty, Gerhard Krapf, Samuel Scheidt and Jacques-Louis Battmann.

All together now

//:na-na na-na na-na na-na://

 

 

Following on, one can be too suspicious sometimes. There's a splendid spoof piece called The Wedding March Toccata, that I whole-heartedly recommend. In it the main themes of the Widor and Mendelssohn are combined in splendid style*. There's only one thing wrong with it, and that is somewhat tricky to play in that Charles-Marie's well-worn patterns suddenly go into unexpected keys. [Off at a Tangent] Thinks: what sort of a woman would christen her son 'Charles Mary'?

 

*Anyway, I assumed that the author, given as E.R.Allright was also a spoof name - like a greeting? - maybe a midland version of 'Ay-up Chuck' - but apparently (and quite possibly unlike the elusive/allusive Mr.Borrow) he does exist.

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Just noticed this thread and realised that I had somehow missed VH's original post of last year on this topic. I don't think the publisher of Borrow's recently-discovered complete works would object to my quoting from the editorial note to the Evening Service in G:

"Frank Borrow (1898-1996) was Master of the Music at the Priory Church of St Winifred, Little Worth, from the age of 17 until his death. He was a prolific but rather secretive composer, writing his music on the back of old service sheets using invisible ink. The extent of his composition only became apparent following a fire in the vestry shortly after his death, when the warmth of the flames revealed some of the ink at the top of a pile of papers stacked in a corner. These papers were rescued by the churchwardens and were found to contain a large quantity of fine music. The Great Service, from which this Magnificat & Nunc Dimittis is taken, is dedicated to Noah Vale, his great friend and the landlord of his favourite hostelry. Like much of Borrow’s music, it reveals consummate craftsmanship and a musical language that is subtly allusive."

 

Interesting also that the church at Little Worth has not yet reached the NPOR - maybe the instrument here (if in fact there is one) could be discussed on a new thread especially if Borrow had any hand in its development. A 'Borrow' system for organ stops would be quite handy - something like the libraries of sampled sounds for electronics! (Could pcnd's Chamades be loaned out perhaps?)

 

AJJ

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Could pcnd's Chamades be loaned out perhaps?

O Lord, I hope not.

 

Interesting point about the organ. We have no information on this. When not mastering the music in St Winifred's Frank's main interest seems to have been his chamber choir, the Camerata of Little Worth.

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Guest Psalm 78 v.67
(Could pcnd's Chamades be loaned out perhaps?)

 

AJJ

 

No need - get the timing right to the split and just ask pcnd to solo out whatever you want on his Chamade. this should work up to a 50-mile radius of his place (ok I know that there aren't many churches that far due south of there, but.....) :D

 

PS - Weren't Diaphones (or at least something like them) used as foghorns at one time?? B)

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[Off at a Tangent] Thinks: what sort of a woman would christen her son 'Charles Mary'?

 

Presumably someone of a similar disposition to the mother of Shirley Crabtree (a.k.a. 'Big Daddy'), Marion Morrison (John Wayne) or Robyn Hitchcock (English contemporary singer/songwriter). Oh - and Richard Tiffany Gere.

 

 

Yes, you did read that correctly.

 

 

However, I agree - it does sound a little odd.

 

No need - get the timing right to the split and just ask pcnd to solo out whatever you want on his Chamade. this should work up to a 50-mile radius of his place (ok I know that there aren't many churches that far due south of there, but.....)

 

Thank you so much....

 

B)

 

lmfao

 

O Lord, I hope not.

 

Vox - I am hurt.... :D

 

have you ever heard them?

 

B)

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Vox - I am hurt.... B)

 

have you ever heard them?

Well, not in the flesh, but I've heard more recordings of them than you might imagine! B)

 

Never fear. At least you can at least use them in a fog without fear of wrecking passing boats - unlike a certain Tuba here.

 

The goats down the road might get a bit randy though.

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Among others, I have works lined up by such greats as Oliphant Chuckerbutty, Gerhard Krapf, Samuel Scheidt and Jacques-Louis Battmann.

All together now

//:na-na na-na na-na na-na://

 

A piece by Battmann appears in David Sanger's organ tuition book. Most people who saw it thought it was DS having a laugh...

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Guest Cynic
A piece by Battmann* appears in David Sanger's organ tuition book. Most people who saw it thought it was DS having a laugh...

 

 

I have a whole volume of his*. I solemnly promise.

And no, it is not anything special, unfortunately.

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