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Richard McVeigh

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Hello Everyone!

 

I am new to this forum and thought I should say a little about myself here!

 

I am Richard Dawson, and am 16. I am the organist of Emmanuel Parish Church, Bentley, and sing in the choir of Emmanuel Parish Church Wylde Green. These days, I also play for a few of the services there, on the wonderful 3 manual Willis III organ there. I have been learning the organ for two years, and am working towards taking grade 8 after passing Grade 6 with distinction last Summer. I organise recital series at Bentley and other fund raising activities to get the organ there restored, and have played 5 of the 7 recitals so far.

 

I currently study the Organ with Toby Barnard, and love playing the organ. I hope to be an organ scholar at Cambridge university one day and hopefully become a cathedral organist!

 

My best organ experience so far occured last weekend (Sunday 6th January 2008) when I played the Widor Toccata (Symphonie No 5) after the 10.00 O clock Eucharist service at Yorkminster Cathedral. Loved every second. Was ecstatic at the end when Francis Jackson approached me and said "Lovely peformance, and at the perfect speed!"

 

I hope to contibute to the intriguing disccusions on this forum over the time to come.

 

Kind Regards,

 

Tuba Magna 91

Richard Dawson

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As a new member, albeit one who has been reading and enjoying the forum for some time, I thought I should introduce myself.

 

My name is Peter and I live in Stratford-upon-Avon. My musical career started with piano lessons from age 7 to 11, when I started to play the organ at my school's chapel. My piano teacher was also the organist at a local church so I switched instruments but kept my teacher. From age 15 to 19 I passed a few exams and ended up as organist at a village church near Stratford along with regular deputising at various other establishments. Through various circumstances revolving largely around a change of tenure at The Rectory, I left, stopped playing (lack of talent may just have been another factor - hence the "handsoff" alias!) and after auditioning was accepted into Andrew Fletcher's choir at St. Mary's Warwick, where I sang tenor for around 7 years. Other, more shapely, diversions took over and that was the end of my active involvement in church music. In the last year I have started playing once again although only at private sessions at a couple of local churches, purely, for now, for my own amusement.

 

I have maintained my interest in organ and choral music and when I was fortunate enough last year to achieve retirement from my career at age 51, I found plenty of time for listening and been busy expanding my CD collection. My tastes are quite wide-ranging but my current favourites are French Romantics, especially Vierne, Guilmant, Widor, Bonnet etc along with Howells choral and organ music choral music from the Tallis era. I absolutely adore the sound of the big French instruments and don't find much to beat the experience of a Cavaillé-Coll tutti with the amazing 32' Bombardes supporting everything.

 

I don't ignore the English tradition and have a goodly selection from around the country.

 

I've started to go to the lunchtime recitals in Birmingham and have just returned from Stephen Cleobury's offering at the Town Hall. What a wonderful sounding instrument with great subtlety as well as enormous power. The Symphony Hall organ is simply stunning; to look at as well as to hear.

 

I shan't be able to contribute a great deal in the way of learned discussion either about the intrument or its music but shall certainly enjoy my daily delves into the fora.

 

Kind regards

 

handsoff

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"My tastes are quite wide-ranging but my current favourites .... Howells choral settings ...."

(Quote)

 

Welcome !

(There is much to do here, any help will be appreciated!)

 

Pierre

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Thank you for the welcome Pierre.

 

I do also like Howells' organ music and should have mentioned that in my original post!

 

handsoff

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"My tastes are quite wide-ranging but my current favourites .... Howells choral settings ...."

(Quote)

 

Welcome !

(There is much to do here, any help will be appreciated!)

 

Pierre

 

Pierre - we have been here before! For the greater part you are probably trying to convert those who are already familiar with the organ and choral works of Howells. By all means continute your missionary work, but I still find most of his organ music somewhat formulaic and less interesting than his choral music, for example. ;)

 

However, I do recommend that, if you do not actually possess this, you try to acquire (through E-Bay, perhaps) a copy of the double LP which was recorded by the choir of Norwich Cathedral. This excellent recording contains much of his organ and choral work. The cathedral choir were directed by Michael Nicholas and the accompaniments were played by Malcolm Archer. Both organists shared the playing of the organ solo items. If you have no luck, do contact me and I will see what I can do.

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Thanks !

 

By the way, we belgians had to be converted back to Joseph Jongen.

Long after....Britain!

And we were convinced we knew all about him....

Nobody is a prophet in his own country; something we are very accustomed

to may seem rather ordinary, and we need the others to realize they are

more of premium character.

This may be true for things like, say, Rose gardens, organ music, and some

organs as well.

 

Pierre

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Thanks !

 

By the way, we belgians had to be converted back to Joseph Jongen.

Long after....Britain!

And we were convinced we knew all about him....

Nobody is a prophet in his own country; something we are very accustomed

to may seem rather ordinary, and we need the others to realize they are

more of premium character.

This may be true for things like, say, Rose gardens, organ music, and some

organs as well.

 

Pierre

 

This is interesting, Pierre. I suppose that it is a case of a prophet being without honour in his own country....

 

Now I have always liked his Sonata Eroïca and some of his shorter pieces; I find the Choral to be a superb miniature.

 

This is the only one I can find at present, since I have to go and iron a shirt for school tomorrow. What exciting lives we organists and teachers live....

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7CXuwra9j8

 

.... Ah - a mistake at 1' 56", another at 2' 15". Hmmm.... the registration did not seem to be quite correct either. Still, the piece is quite good.

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Make a copy?

 

:lol: :lol: :lol:

 

You may smirk, Hennie - but I actually found the record last Saturday (the Mendelssohn, I mean) and I have already given it to my colleague to burn a copy onto a CD for you. Of course, if you are simply going to make snide remarks....

 

:lol:

 

(I know that you have waited patiently for several months - it is on the way.)

 

B)

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....since I have to go and iron a shirt for school tomorrow.

 

Don't schools expect a wide range of extra-curricular activities from their music teachers nowadays.... :lol:

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Don't schools expect a wide range of extra-curricular activities from their music teachers nowadays.... :lol:

 

Well, quite. In any case, I have no idea why I bother, since I can iron about as well as I can hang wallpaper; so the shirt will almost certainly still look as though I had slept in it.

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the shirt will almost certainly still look as though I had slept in it.[/font]

You're OK; I believe that's actually quite fashionable, and one can certainly buy shirts with the rumpled look fixed into the fabric.

 

Paul

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You may smirk, Hennie - but I actually found the record last Saturday (the Mendelssohn, I mean) and I have already given it to my colleague to burn a copy onto a CD for you. Of course, if you are simply going to make snide remarks....

 

:lol:

 

(I know that you have waited patiently for several months - it is on the way.)

 

:lol:

 

Of course; just couldn't resist posting this (it's just one of those days ...)

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Peter, alias hands off - I was also at Birmingham T.H. today, overall enjoyable but for some reason left me slightly disappointed. I didn't think S.C. gave the music sufficient emotion for want of a better word. Probably so used to hearing Mr Trotter. Since Howells was recently mentioned on this thread, one of the subjects on Mastermind this evening was Herbert Howells, his life and music; the lad did quite well.

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You're OK; I believe that's actually quite fashionable, and one can certainly buy shirts with the rumpled look fixed into the fabric.

 

Paul

 

Thank you, Paul - this is somewhat reassuring. Now I can wear my crunchy shirt with pride....

 

:lol:

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Don't schools expect a wide range of extra-curricular activities from their music teachers nowadays.... :lol:

 

 

========================

 

 

I could write a book about that.

 

:lol:

 

MM

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Peter, alias hands off - I was also at Birmingham T.H. today, overall enjoyable but for some reason left me slightly disappointed. I didn't think S.C. gave the music sufficient emotion for want of a better word. Probably so used to hearing Mr Trotter. Since Howells was recently mentioned on this thread, one of the subjects on Mastermind this evening was Herbert Howells, his life and music; the lad did quite well.

 

I agree Jim, the playing seemed in parts to be a bit "routine". I'll admit to being a teensy bit bored in the Bach at one point, but the colours SC used in some of the variations did lift the atmosphere. He did get more animated after the middle section of the Messiaen and I also became quite fired-up when the big reeds came in.

 

Incidentally, one of the door stewards in the circle was wearing very conspicuous green ear plugs. Was it that loud?!

 

I must use my cable channel's play again function for Marstermind....

 

Best regards

 

Peter

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Well, quite. In any case, I have no idea why I bother, since I can iron about as well as I can hang wallpaper; so the shirt will almost certainly still look as though I had slept in it.

Watch out! Mr. Balls might read this and add ironing as well as cooking to the National Curriculum. I wonder which subjects will lose out as a result of this latest initiative?

JC

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Having been a member of this forum for a short time now, I thought I'd introduce myself also.

 

I'm one of three titular organists at my local parish church here in Malta - a system rather akin to that of Notre Dame de Paris, with us playing for different masses. We have a fine Tamburini pipe organ dating from the 1940s and a Johannus toaster also, both of which get frequent use.

 

I'm originally British in nationality, but grew up here and decided to stay put, and try to visit the UK as frequently as possible. Despite a rather fruitless attempt at the clarinet, and piano studies for many years, most of my music-making is focused mainly on the organ. Aside from my organ playing, I work as an English teacher.

 

The organ is a somewhat unappreciated instrument here in the Maltese islands. We have many fine organs, but a great number of them have fallen into a state of disrepair. With only one qualified organ builder, and few organists to play them, many pipe organs are forgotten about and completely replaced by electronic instruments. However, those of us who do care are keen to see these organs restored to perfect working order once again!

 

It is a great pleasure to meet you all.

 

Timothy Guntrip

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Greetings Timothy. One thing that I think went unremarked on this forum is that Malta lost its leading composer, Charles Camilleri, just a few months ago. He wrote music for the organ such as the Invocation to the Creator.

 

Peter

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I've been posting here a while, and since this has been bumped up I thought I'd put something in it...

 

Philip Sherratt, 21 years old. I'm just about to finish studying Economics at Nottingham University (final set of exams start on Monday!). Home for me is Hornchurch in Essex. I started learning piano while still in Primary School (alas, only to Grade 2 as my teacher stopped teaching due to illness) and began playing at one of the daughter churches in my home parish soon after (piano/keyboard only). I soon began to take an interest in the organ, and have gradually worked (with the help of a couple of organists from back home) to add the pedals in and adjust to the more complicated but far more fun world of organ playing. I've now started playing for services at the Parish Church, St Andrews (when I'm home from University), which has a fine (if slightly underpowered for the building) 3-manual Speechly (refurbed several times) - see http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi...ec_index=K00239 for the current spec.

 

Whilst at University, I am the organist at Beeston Parish Church (a couple of miles south-west of Nottingham). I began attending the church when I first arrived at University, and by the end of the first term the previous organist had left, leaving a gap for me to conveniently slot into to! The DOM is not an organist, so I have full monopoly over playing for Sunday services while I'm there. We have a very active choir, with a full sung service at 10am every Sunday morning, including responsorial psalm, (congregational) mass setting and anthem. The choir also sing evensong from time-to-time, and various other special services when the season dictates. We currently have a two-manual Rodgers, installed just over a year ago as part of a full internal reordering of the church. Previous to this we had a three-manual Makin (which wasn't all that nice by the time it had been there for 20 years!) - the last pipe organ disappeared in the 1980s. Frankly, given the way space is now used following the reordering, I don't know where we'd put the necessary pipework anyway, and the Rodgers is a decent substitute.

 

I've never had any formal organ lessons (perhaps I should do...?!), so all progress that I have made from playing the piano has largely been through continual practice and self-teaching, with bits of help from various people along the way. Certainly, there has been no substitute for being able to play week in, week out at Beeston, during which time I have really improved - simply because I am learning as I go! The congregation seem to be responding a lot more to what I'm playing, so I must be doing something right! I hope to stay in Beeston for the forseeable future, conditional upon finding some kind of full-time work in the area!

 

As you'll probably have noticed, I find this forum a very useful resource for finding new music, as well as an interesting read (even if I don't always understand everything that is said!).

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