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New Bach Mss Discovered


sjf1967
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Indeed it is: http://www.breitkopf.com/suchErgebnis.php?...searchKmpId=796 - though I think there isn't much of it.

 

I imagine the Buxtehude find is especially important, given the state of the sources of his organ music?

Absolutely, Vox. It looks from the facsimile on the BBC site as if the copies are in tablature; this could be very significant as most of the Buxtehude sources are later and written in staff notation. There could be some interesting variant readings. Even more exciting is the possibility that there are more significant things waiting to be unearthed - this is the same archive from which the unknown soprano and orchestra piece emerged not so long ago.
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Is any of Reinken's music in print?

 

 

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I don't know about in print Nick, but I've got some old copies, which I think includes the Reinken organ tutor book.

 

You may borrow them, if you wish. Interestingly, I've also got two books of piano arrangements of the Beethoven Symphonies, in copper-leaf facsimile, which are almost contemporary with Beethoven himself!

 

They may even be worth something.

 

MM

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================

 

I don't know about in print Nick, but I've got some old copies, which I think includes the Reinken organ tutor book.

 

You may borrow them, if you wish. Interestingly, I've also got two books of piano arrangements of the Beethoven Symphonies, in copper-leaf facsimile, which are almost contemporary with Beethoven himself!

 

They may even be worth something.

 

MM

MM - J A Reinken, 1632 -1722, wrote an organ tutor? It must be the earliest one extant, and would solve a lot of arguments about fingering....are we talking about the same Reinken that Bach met? The Reinken organ works are published in a new edition by Breitkopf, Nick, and should be easy enough to track down.

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  • 2 weeks later...
MM - J A Reinken, 1632 -1722,  wrote an organ tutor? It must be the earliest one extant, and would solve a lot of arguments about fingering....are we talking about the same Reinken that Bach met? The Reinken organ works are published in a new edition by Breitkopf, Nick, and should be easy enough to track down.

 

==============

 

Oooops! :o A rare mistake on my part.

 

I was thinking of Rink!

 

Don't play any Reinken, am I missing out on something good?

 

MM

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==============

 

Oooops!  :o  A rare mistake on my part.

 

I was thinking of Rink!

 

Don't play any Reinken, am I missing out on something good?

 

MM

There are only a few pieces - all good in an austere North German sort of way, but probably not for the very general audience, if you see what I mean; it's not a style which transfers well to all instrument types. Undeniably interesting music, though.
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There are only a few pieces - all good in an austere North German sort of way, but probably not for the very general audience, if you see what I mean; it's not a style which transfers well to all instrument types. Undeniably interesting music, though.

 

I'm sure I read somewhere that JSB was supposed to have based the BWV542 fugue on a subject written by Reineken (from Hortus Musicus?). I'm probably wrong - can anyone shed further light on this?

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I'm sure I read somewhere that JSB was supposed to have based the BWV542 fugue on a subject written by Reineken (from Hortus Musicus?). I'm probably wrong - can anyone shed further light on this?

I think this is a bit like the claim that the first half of his C minor Passacaglia theme was pinched from Raison. In both cases the similarity is probably nothing more than a coincidence.

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I'm sure I read somewhere that JSB was supposed to have based the BWV542 fugue on a subject written by Reineken (from Hortus Musicus?). I'm probably wrong - can anyone shed further light on this?

The version I was told was the other way round. That is that Reinken was the adjudicator for the Jacobi, Hamburg job in 1720 and deliberately set a fugue subject modelled on 542. (If true Reinken, though still alive, would have been 97). Apparently JSB won but declined to pay the 'fee' (bribe) of about 1 years salary.

 

One has to wonder how differently JSB's output would have turned out is he'd taken this playing/chamber concert job with a 'big' N German organ rather than the (fourth choice) Director Musices (and schoolmaster) at Leipzig.

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