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Westgate Morris

Pre-flash!

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Hello: Similar to my last thread.... I may be starting to late but I want to learn some serious rep. (again).

Recently being invited to play at the cathedral, I was embarrassed that I couldn't pull out a 8 - 12 min prelude or even two solid 6 min pieces. I ended up playing the 3 Lit. Preludes by Oldroyd. It felt like a set and that was my attempt at playing something "English."

 

I want to spend my limited time learning something I need not be embarrassed about.

 

Alain? Mendelssohn Organ Sonata movements?

 

So the lines are open... what do you say.

 

WM

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My favourites would include the Bridge Adagio in E major, the first 5 of the 6 Howells Psalm-Preludes, some Whitlock, though these aren't of great length - try Folk Tune, Dolcezza, Fidelis all in an OUP album Complete Shorter Organ Works by Whitlock. There's a lovely piece by Noel Rawsthorne based on the Londonderry Air published by Mayhew, some of Malcolm Archer's slow pieces are very pleasing on the ear (maybe a bit Radio 2!). Lots and lots of JSB chorale preludes fit the bill. Thalben-Ball Tune in E is really rather lovely. Try some Rheinberger Sonata movements - Sonata 11 comes to mind - Mendelssohn 1st Sonata, 2nd movt is beautifully crafted. Parry Chorale Preludes: try Rockingham and Melcombe. Hope that's enough to get started with!

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If you want off the beaten track stuff:

 

Felton Rapley: Pastoral Improvisation.

I heard this played on the radio about 30 years ago and have never heard of anyone doing it since. But it's really very pleasant. English pastoral idiom and very orchestral in conception (it would make a good orchestration exercise). Not at all "churchy" - in fact just ever so slightly "easy listening" in tone. Needs a Tuba for the central climax.

 

Liszt: Salve regina

Grade 2 ABRSM. Don't scoff - it's really quite atmospheric!

 

Demessieux: "Twelve Chorale Preludes on Gregorian Chant Themes".

Some of these make good pre-service pieces, particularly Rorate coeli and In manus tuas.

 

Carl Piutti: Chorale Preludes

There are two volumes of these published by Bärenreiter. They're all easy; most are sight-readable.

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More mainstream:

 

Vierne: Clair de lune

So sensuous!

 

J. L. Krebs: O König dessen Majestät

Or quite a few of his other chorale preludes for that matter, but this one has the dimensions and feel of one of Bach's "Eighteen".

 

Duruflé: Sicilienne (from the Suite)

Tricky, but well worth the bother.

 

Howells: Siciliano for a High Ceremony

An under-rated piece. Not played so much as his other pieces, maybe because its gentle lilt doesn't appeal to those who like their Howells indulgently mushy. Nevertheless it is quintessential Howells.

 

Lübeck: Ich ruf' zu dir

A fairly lengthy, but very inventive chorale fantasia

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Guest Andrew Butler

Talking of under-rated composers, have you thought of trying Caleb Simper?

 

:)

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                                          a Tuba

 

 

aagh! you taunt.

 

well - most of the 18 Chorales

 

as already spake, Howels PsPr Set 1 nr 1 and Bridge Adagio in E

 

I have in my posession some rather wonderful but unknown chorale preludes etc by Anthony Scott, a Howells/Finzi pupil who had a bad experience with a publisher in the 1950's and just put the rest of his considerable output (1950-2001) in the airing cupboard - copies by PM

 

Quite a few of the Vierne 24

 

Messiaen banquet celeste

 

Franck Chorales 1 and 2 are mostly fairly settled in mood but get big in the middle - 2 is the finest piece ever written by anyone

 

Or, better still, learn to improvise - then you can just open the hymn book at random and make something that fits the mood perfectly. It is really very easy to do. PM Nigel Allcoat and get his Masterclass CD's, or keep an eye out for him or David Briggs appearing near you & ask for a lesson. Once you've mentally grabbed a couple of basic frameworks it's really quite possible to do away with pre-service music altogether.

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Hello: Similar to my last thread.... I may be starting to late but I want to learn some serious rep. (again).

Recently being invited to play at the cathedral, I was embarrassed that I couldn't pull out a 8 - 12 min prelude or even two solid 6 min pieces. I ended up playing the 3 Lit. Preludes by Oldroyd. It felt like a set and that was my attempt at playing something "English."

 

I want to spend my limited time learning something I need not be embarrassed about.

 

Alain? Mendelssohn Organ Sonata movements?

 

So the lines are open... what do you say.

 

WM

 

 

==================

 

You should always strive to play musically, whatever the technical level.

 

So why not REALLY seriously beautiful music?

 

"Te luce ante termini" - Dupre

 

"Berceuse" Vierne :)

 

"Aria" Flor Peeters

 

Almost any of the simpler Bach Chorale Preludes

 

MM

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I would put in a very strong bid for Rawsthorne's Aria published by Kevin Mayhew - worth its weight in gold. I have played it in concerts, before services, after services, as a quiet encore and it never lets me down. I seem to recall it was set for AB Grade 5 or 6. Run, don't walk, to buy this piece.

 

I have recently been introduced to Stephen Burtonwood's music which is well worth exploring ; Herbert Howells meets Rachmaninoff and they walk across the downs to Choral Evensong together whilst the clock stands still at ten to three ; you get the picture. His Cantilena is not difficult but hits the spot every time.

 

As for Howells himself, I am coming to the view that the E flat prelude in the middle of the first set (But the meek shall inherit the Earth) is, perhaps, the best of the lot. All that English regret.

 

Thalben Ball's Elegy in B flat is a classic of the type; it has the reputation (undeserved in my view) as corny, but played straight it shows itself to be a fine piece which is ideal before a service.

 

Finally, William Harris' Prelude in E flat is a perfect miniature - the first of the Four Pieces.

 

Lots to enjoy there !

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A Tuba, Argh.................  inside joke? Tuba envy? :)

WM

 

 

Tuba envy??

 

God, no!

 

 

Just a comment on the lack of taste....

 

Personally speaking, I always manage a very nice climax without the aid of a tuba.

 

:)

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You could try Pierre Cochereau's Berceuse à la Mémoire de Louis Vierne. This is a very beautiful piece....

 

.... and it does not need a tuba.

 

Goody.

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Or, better still, learn to improvise - then you can just open the hymn book at random and make something that fits the mood perfectly.  It is really very easy to do.  PM Nigel Allcoat and get his Masterclass CD's, or keep an eye out for him or David Briggs appearing near you & ask for a lesson.  Once you've mentally grabbed a couple of basic frameworks it's really quite possible to do away with pre-service music altogether.

 

I can certainly recommend David Briggs as a teacher of improvisation.

 

There is also the Berceuse by George Baker, who is a Texan organist and a former pupil of Cochereau.

 

How about Rheinberger? Sonata No. 8 is a good work, with one or two suitable middle movements.

 

Also the Quinze Versets de Vêpres du Commun, by Marcel Dupré. Then there are various movements from symphonies by Vierne and Widor. For example, the Andante Cantabile, from Widor's 4me Symphonie; the Adagio from the 5me Symphonie; the Pastorale (ii) and the Adagio (v) from the 2me Symphonie. Then there is the Adagio from Vierne's 3me Symphonie. Or the wonderful Choral (ii) from his 2me Symphonie - however, this movement ends stunningly on the tutti, with one of the most sublime conclusions in the repertoire.

 

Alternatively, purchase a few CDs of players and works which may be unfamiliar to you - you may discover one or two previously-unknown gems.

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As I have had lots (well, 6) emails about Anthony Scott organ pieces, here are links to recordings:

 

http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/coramdc/index_files/martyrdom.mp3

http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/coramdc/index_files/adorote.mp3

http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/coramdc/index_files/lincoln.mp3

 

Guess what stop is featured in the last one? That's right, it's a

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Dear Mister Coram,

 

Since long I am in search of sound files illustrating *some strange* things in order

to present them to continental organists and builders on my french forum.

So thanks and go on!

 

(Would you by the way have some others? I would not dare place the wanted- list here since read ink could invade the screen... :) )

 

Pierre

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Dear Mister Coram,

 

Since long I am in search of sound files illustrating *some strange* things in order

to present them to continental organists and builders on my french forum.

So thanks and go on!

 

(Would you by the way have some others? I would not dare place the wanted- list here since read ink could invade the screen... :) )

 

Pierre

 

=====================

 

Well, there is Whitlock.....fine.

 

There is Caleb Simper....less fine

 

Then there is HH..........

 

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaagh!

 

 

MM

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=====================

 

Well, there is Whitlock.....fine.

 

There is Caleb Simper....less fine

 

Then there is HH..........

 

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaagh!

MM

 

Hmmm.... I think that I would have put HH in advance of the other two, however much one may dislike his music.

Unless, of course, you were joking "MM".

 

:ph34r:

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Thanks, David,

 

I am rather in search of on-line files, though; recordings

I have some, and either it is not allowed to put them on-line,

either they are on old LPs and I do not have what's needed

to digitalize them.

There should be a british equivalent to "Aeoline.de" in order

to illustrate -and promote- the british organ's peculiarities

before all are "enlightened" -I mean, replaced with spanish

Trumpets etc. ( :ph34r: )

 

Pierre

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