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Music Desk Pegs


Guest delvin146
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Guest delvin146

Which angle do you like yours to be at? After leaving the console I always make sure they are turned to the horizontal position to blend with the line of the music rest.

 

Any preference, brass, gold, stainless steel?

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Which angle do you like yours to be at? After leaving the console I always make sure they are turned to the horizontal position to blend with the line of the music rest.

 

Any preference, brass, gold, stainless steel?

This reply does not answer your question but I'm keen to ask another. These pegs, as you call them, are never seen in the States. Does the English organist regard them as indispensible?

 

I can imagine all sorts of uses for them, but at the same time I'd worry that I might hurt myself on them by some quick movement.

 

Please inform me, one and all !

 

Karl Watson

Staten Island, NY

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Guest delvin146
This reply does not answer your question but I'm keen to ask another. These pegs, as you call them, are never seen in the States.  Does the English organist regard them as indispensible?

 

I can imagine all sorts of uses for them, but at the same time I'd worry that I might hurt myself on them by some quick movement.

 

Please inform me, one and all !

 

Karl Watson

Staten Island, NY

 

We simply could not function without them over, such is the magnitude of their overall contribution which is so often overlooked by many. These poor little L shaped metal prongs remain neglected in many British organ lofts. Uncared for, and never polished. They never cease to contribute to the worship on a regular basis year in, year out. I often sit there admiring them and try to picture all the different organists that have turned them over years past. Could Dupre once have sat here I wonder?

 

I think there's a good cause for starting up a charity who goes round polishing uncared for music pegs and restoring them to their former glory. "BUMP" - British Uncared For Music Pegs.

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Which angle do you like yours to be at? After leaving the console I always make sure they are turned to the horizontal position to blend with the line of the music rest.

 

Any preference, brass, gold, stainless steel?

Whether organ or piano, I would never consider leaving them other than horizontal - too much risk of hurting the next music that's put up there. Old tarnished brass is best against the wood; shiny gold is naff, stainless steel looks like an unloved replacement.

 

Paul

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Whether organ or piano, I would never consider leaving them other than horizontal - too much risk of hurting the next music that's put up there.  Old tarnished brass is best against the wood; shiny gold is naff, stainless steel looks like an unloved replacement.

 

Paul

 

Don't forget that Willis used stainless steel (or chrome plated, perhaps?) pegs very effectively in his ebonised consoles which adds to their art deco charm.

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This reply does not answer your question but I'm keen to ask another. These pegs, as you call them, are never seen in the States.  Does the English organist regard them as indispensible?

 

I can imagine all sorts of uses for them, but at the same time I'd worry that I might hurt myself on them by some quick movement.

 

Please inform me, one and all !

 

Karl Watson

Staten Island, NY

 

Some of the music books that I buy these days seem to have an automatic closing gene in them. With out our little friends, life would be impossible.

 

FF

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Guest Lee Blick

I broke one off of four on my organ this morning. It is a bloody pain to make the music stay on properly now. Are they easy to replace? Does anyone know where I can get a new one fitted?

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I broke one off of four on my organ this morning.  It is a bloody pain to make the music stay on properly now.  Are they easy to replace?  Does anyone know where I can get a new one fitted?

 

They usually just screw in...

 

For spares have you tried...

 

http://www.uk-piano.org/heckscher/

 

http://www.fletcher-newman.co.uk/

 

 

If not in their catalogues a phone call often gives leads to elsewhere I find!

 

Best wishes with your search.

 

David W

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They are indeed indipensible, and in my view ought to be regulated carefully so that they do not drop down of their own accord, yet can be flipped out of the way when neccessary by a gentle passing movement of a spare finger.

 

Someone uses our instrument tightens them as if they were retaining part of a high-pressure steam system.

 

I have never before had a forum in which to complain about this: many thanks, esteemed colleagues!

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By the by, I've seen them in the Kimber-Allen catalogue.

 

So, how do you keep pages (especially those of a large new hymn-book) from closing or even blowing around, without the hooks?

 

I prefer mine to be horizontal, and all pointing to the centre - not that I am neurotic, or anything....

 

Also, I always leave the GO and Pedal Combination Coupler drawn - both this stop and the transfer Generals on Swell Toe Pedals have been deliberately disconnected from the General Cancel piston.

 

If it comes to that, am I one of only two people here who has difficulty leaving the organ? I have been known to stand staring at the console - I have no idea what I think it is going to do - turn itself back on, perhaps - God knows....

 

B)B)

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So, how do you keep pages (especially those of a large new hymn-book) from closing or even blowing around, without the hooks?

 

I prefer mine to be horizontal, and all pointing to the centre - not that I am neurotic, or anything....

 

Also, I always leave the GO and Pedal Combination Coupler drawn - both this stop and the transfer Generals on Swell Toe Pedals have been deliberately disconnected from the General Cancel piston.

 

If it comes to that, am I one of only two people here who has difficulty leaving the organ? I have been known to stand staring at the console - I have no idea what I think it is going to do - turn itself back on, perhaps - God knows....

 

B)  B)

 

How nice that we all agree on something for a change. One of the instruments I play (the crematorium) has - can you believe - NO MUSIC PEGS AT ALL. Disastrous, particularly when you consider there's an air conditioning unit right behind you. A large collection of bulldog clips and other weighty books to hold the right page open is the only way to cope.

 

On the leaving the organ point, I don't know whether I'm the second or you are referring to the esteem'd SJF. Of course I can always tell when the main organ's off - by feeling the action - but the nave organ is another matter altogether. I have been known to drive the 5 miles back to check.

 

Congratulations to the person who boldly took the risk of looking an utter prat in order to start what is proving to be an exceptionally interesting topic.

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How nice that we all agree on something for a change.  One of the instruments I play (the crematorium) has - can you believe - NO MUSIC PEGS AT ALL.  Disastrous, particularly when you consider there's an air conditioning unit right behind you.  A large collection of bulldog clips and other weighty books to hold the right page open is the only way to cope.

 

On the leaving the organ point, I don't know whether I'm the second or you are referring to the esteem'd SJF.  Of course I can always tell when the main organ's off - by feeling the action - but the nave organ is another matter altogether.  I have been known to drive the 5 miles back to check.

 

Congratulations to the person who boldly took the risk of looking an utter prat in order to start what is proving to be an exceptionally interesting topic.

 

 

.... Naturally, I am not prepared to say whether it was you or sjf to whom I was referring!

 

 

B)

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5 miles? I once drove back 15. Needless to say, I had left both the organ deactivated and the chuch secure. It sems that many organists suffer from this very specific form of OCD. My theory is that it sterms from early experience. All of us, I'm sure have, as beginners, been issued with dire warnings about the dangers of leaving the blower on, the shutters open etc. Fair enough, of course. However, many of us have also had to put up with petty chuch officials complaining that 'some youngster is being allowed to damage the organ'. Result, lifelong paranoia. Of course, I'm only writing this because the voices tell me to...

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All of us, I'm sure have, as beginners, been issued with dire warnings about the dangers of leaving the blower on, the shutters open etc.  Fair enough, of course. 

 

Ah, swell shutters. Well of course I always leave my toaster swell pedals in the open position to save it drifting out of tune. B)

 

I also do this to the pipe organ at church - however it serves no purpose since the shutters (horizontal) close as soon as the organ is turned off! B)

 

JJK

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They usually just screw in...

 

For spares have you tried...

 

http://www.uk-piano.org/heckscher/

 

http://www.fletcher-newman.co.uk/

If not in their catalogues a phone call often gives leads to elsewhere I find!

 

Best wishes with your search.

 

David W

 

Hi

 

Last time I needed some I bought them from a piano dealer locally - a good piano tuner will know where to get them even if he doesn't have a stock.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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5 miles? I once drove back 15.  Needless to say, I had left both the organ deactivated and the chuch secure.  It sems that many organists suffer from this very specific form of OCD.  My theory is that it sterms from early experience.  All of us, I'm sure have, as beginners, been issued with dire warnings about the dangers of leaving the blower on, the shutters open etc.  Fair enough, of course.  However, many of us have also had to put up with petty chuch officials complaining that 'some youngster is being allowed to damage the organ'.  Result, lifelong paranoia.  Of course, I'm only writing this because the voices tell me to...

 

One of my earliest DIY jobs was to install a pilot light where you could see it from the exit door. It saved the climb back into the loft a number of times.

 

JC

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Its another area where the american toaster manufacturers fail to make playable instruments. Allen in particular used to make the supporting (bottom) edge of the music desk hollow so that it could contain an electric light. (I'm not sure if they're still doing this.) Not only was this a hopeless way of lighting a music desk but it also mad it more or less impossible to fit music hooks.

 

I share the paranoia about switching off, but in my cases its not confined to organs. I have to check I've switched the iron off about three times every morning, and I also have a real thing about whether I've forgotten to lock up properly.

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Its another area where the american toaster manufacturers fail to make playable instruments. Allen in particular used to make the supporting (bottom) edge of the music desk hollow so that it could contain an electric light. (I'm not sure if they're still doing this.) Not only was this a hopeless way of lighting a music desk but it also mad it more or less impossible to fit music hooks.

I've played a number of organs with this sort of "bottom lit" music desk and they are crass. Unless the music pages are lying absolutely flat the light shines up behind the one you are trying to read and you get backlit show-through of the notes on the reverse side.

 

On the subject of American hymn books, without exception in all the episcopal churches where I have played the organ has had a two-volume, ring-bound hymn book in hard maroon covers. No problem with this lying reasonably flat.

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Its another area where the american toaster manufacturers fail to make playable instruments. Allen in particular used to make the supporting (bottom) edge of the music desk hollow so that it could contain an electric light. (I'm not sure if they're still doing this.) Not only was this a hopeless way of lighting a music desk but it also mad it more or less impossible to fit music hooks.

 

I share the paranoia about switching off, but in my cases its not confined to organs. I have to check I've switched the iron off about three times every morning, and I also have a real thing about whether I've forgotten to lock up properly.

 

Thank God - someone else!

 

 

I agree about the Allen music desk lights, too. I occasionally have to teach someone on one of these and it is quite unsatisfactory in every way, particularly the useless up-light which, at best, only provides a ghostly bluish glow for the bottom inch or so of whatever book is placed on the desk.

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5 miles? I once drove back 15.  Needless to say, I had left both the organ deactivated and the chuch secure.  It sems that many organists suffer from this very specific form of OCD.  My theory is that it sterms from early experience.  All of us, I'm sure have, as beginners, been issued with dire warnings about the dangers of leaving the blower on, the shutters open etc.  Fair enough, of course.  However, many of us have also had to put up with petty chuch officials complaining that 'some youngster is being allowed to damage the organ'.  Result, lifelong paranoia.  Of course, I'm only writing this because the voices tell me to...

 

As an apprentice, on leaving a church after a tuning visit I was taught a little `safety' chant that I still use today.

 

"WINDS OFF, LIGHTS OFF, I'M OFF!" Its saved me (and still does) driving back to check many times.

 

FF

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  • 1 month later...
As an apprentice, on leaving a church after a tuning visit I was taught a little `safety' chant that I still use today.

 

"WINDS OFF, LIGHTS OFF, I'M OFF!" Its saved me (and still does) driving back to check many times.

 

FF

 

That's a useful one, I will remember that.

 

I don't know if anyone has come across organs where a music desk peg has broken off at some point and someone (I'm not going to blame the organ builder as I suspect it was the incumbant organist) installed a new one slightly to one side, leaving the stub of the old one intact. It looked aweful, it wasn't even the same colour or shape! :o

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