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All Gas And Gaiters


Peter Clark
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This talk of the Vicar of Dibley reminded me of the greatest, I think, of the ecclesiastical sit-coms, All Gas and Gaiters with the incomparable Dereck Nimmo (before he lost it and had to make a living starring in Neighbours and so on). But who knows about the theme music? As I recall in starts with an inverted mordant a la BWV 565 and then there is a psuedo-baroque bit sung by what could well have been the Swingle Singers. Anyway: does anybody know who wrote it? Who played the organ and where? Who sang the vocal bits? Thanks

 

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Peter

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This talk of the Vicar of Dibley reminded me of the greatest, I think, of the ecclesiastical sit-coms, All Gas and Gaiters with the incomparable Dereck Nimmo (before he lost it and had to make a living starring in Neighbours and so on). But who knows about the theme music? As I recall in starts with an inverted mordant a la BWV 565 and then there is a psuedo-baroque bit sung by what could well have been the Swingle Singers. Anyway: does anybody know who wrote it? Who played the organ and where? Who sang the vocal bits? Thanks

Best I can do is that the pilot episode theme was Ron Grainer, and the series music was partly Ron Grainer and partly Stanley Myers (the division now being lost). 11 of the 33 episodes survive, and so watching the DVD of them might reveal more.

 

Paul

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Guest Barry Oakley
This talk of the Vicar of Dibley reminded me of the greatest, I think, of the ecclesiastical sit-coms, All Gas and Gaiters with the incomparable Dereck Nimmo (before he lost it and had to make a living starring in Neighbours and so on). But who knows about the theme music? As I recall in starts with an inverted mordant a la BWV 565 and then there is a psuedo-baroque bit sung by what could well have been the Swingle Singers. Anyway: does anybody know who wrote it? Who played the organ and where? Who sang the vocal bits? Thanks

 

Peter, Got to agree with you about “All Gas and Gaiters” although I do get more than a fair share of laughs from “The V of D.” I did wonder about the music because the opening introductory shots for the programme showed St Albans Cathedral with a spire appended to its squat tower. Can’t provide you with any really useful information, but I wonder if there might have been clues associating St Albans?

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Guest Andrew Butler
Peter, Got to agree with you about “All Gas and Gaiters” although I do get more than a fair share of laughs from “The V of D.” I did wonder about the music because the opening introductory shots for the programme showed St Albans Cathedral with a spire appended to its squat tower. Can’t provide you with any really useful information, but I wonder if there might have been clues associating St Albans?

 

Was the spire not Chesterfield parish Church? (I always assumed the whole building was Chesterfield, but I can't remember....)

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Guest Barry Oakley
Was the spire not Chesterfield parish Church? (I always assumed the whole building was Chesterfield, but I can't remember....)

 

The building was definitely St Albans and I don't remember seeing the spire contortions of Chesterfield PC which I know well. I thought the spire was more Salisbury or Norwich-like.

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This talk of the Vicar of Dibley reminded me of the greatest, I think, of the ecclesiastical sit-coms, All Gas and Gaiters with the incomparable Dereck Nimmo (before he lost it and had to make a living starring in Neighbours and so on). But who knows about the theme music? As I recall in starts with an inverted mordant a la BWV 565 and then there is a psuedo-baroque bit sung by what could well have been the Swingle Singers. Anyway: does anybody know who wrote it? Who played the organ and where? Who sang the vocal bits? Thanks

 

Best

 

Peter

 

 

=======================

 

 

I'm a "Father Ted" man myself.....whacky Irish humour at its very best.

 

A wonderful parody of Irish Catholicism.

 

MM

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"All Gas and Gaiters" for me.

 

Another tv reverend I loved - but in a serious role rather than a comedy - was Frank Middlemass as Herries in "To Serve Them All My Days". Now that was a wonderful serial: well acted, great production values, and quite moving. I haven't seen it in 15 years or so, I'd say, but I can still hear the school song in my head. Or at least a memory of it in my head ...

 

And what I now hear in my head is quite Hereford-ish. But where was it actually recorded? Does anyone know?

 

Regards (and best wishes for a happy and holy Christmas),

MJF

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Guest Roffensis
"All Gas and Gaiters" for me.

 

Another tv reverend I loved - but in a serious role rather than a comedy - was Frank Middlemass as Herries in "To Serve Them All My Days". Now that was a wonderful serial: well acted, great production values, and quite moving. I haven't seen it in 15 years or so, I'd say, but I can still hear the school song in my head. Or at least a memory of it in my head ...

 

And what I now hear in my head is quite Hereford-ish. But where was it actually recorded? Does anyone know?

 

Regards (and best wishes for a happy and holy Christmas),

MJF

 

 

Milton Abbey. It's on DVD, it's superb and well worth buying.

 

R

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Milton Abbey. It's on DVD, it's superb and well worth buying.

 

R

 

Now *that* is an acoustic to die for. My wife and I went for a walk there with a couple of other singing friends, and popped into the Abbey - we found an Oxford Tudor Anthems lying around and sang through a few. It was like having another 40 voices with us - absolutely marvellous.

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Guest Roffensis
Now *that* is an acoustic to die for. My wife and I went for a walk there with a couple of other singing friends, and popped into the Abbey - we found an Oxford Tudor Anthems lying around and sang through a few. It was like having another 40 voices with us - absolutely marvellous.

 

 

A lovely church......

 

R

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  • 2 years later...
Ha! So should I - I've got all of the (surviving) programmes on the video set! :lol:

 

No doubt the BBC bitterly regret only retaining some of the 33 tapes, because they would have been worth a fortune in DVD sales. The same thing happened to Dads Army, and many other comedy shows which could never be recreated because all the stars are now gone.

Apparently it was to save money because acetate? tapes were so expensive, and they were just reused.

This does not happen now, and it is also unfortunate that most recordings of great radio shows such as TAKE IT FROM HERE, and Round the Horne .were destroyed.

Colin Richell.

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No doubt the BBC bitterly regret only retaining some of the 33 tapes

Logic would lead one to hope so, but, considering it's a large corporation which no doubt suffers from the inertia of all such bodies, I suspect the actual reaction will have been more along the lines of a shrug and an "Oh well..."

 

More to the point, I seem to recall a bit of an outcry some years ago (a faint one that ought to have been a lot stronger) about the destroying of a lot of Radio 3 archive tapes because the storage room was needed. One can only imagine what must have been lost.

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