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Easter


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Guest paul@trinitymusic.karoo.co.uk
If you were going to learn one new piece for Easter, what would it be, and why?

 

J

 

 

Assuming that this is a request for our advice to your son, the piece I would suggest he finds and learns is Chorale and Fugue by Marcel Dupre, published by UMP. The Choral is very fine (only mp), quite dark and highly palatable. The Fugue is a sort of dance based on the Easter Alleluia; it's a splendid piece in every way, thrilling, jubilant etc..

 

If you want something English, I suggest he need look no further than Howells' Sarabande for the Morning of Easter from 'Six Pieces' (Novello).

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Tournemire Victimae Paschali- because its a farily ubiquitous easter piece and i haven't learnt it yet. I need to learn some Langlais at some point as well, as Peter recommends; trying to get to grips with the Te Deum atm (amongst a load of pieces by other composers) simply because his 100th birthday is not far away.

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Gordan Slaters toccata on easter hymn was popular a few years ago when i first got passed a copy by my then organ teacher. Never have learnt it but might do for this year.

 

I think novello also published a book of 6 hymn tune preludes etc - its part of their series (there is a fantastic christmas one on Divinium Mysterium in another book)

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Victimae Paschali Laudes from 3 Plainsong Settings by Jacobus Kloppers (S. African composer/academic now living and teaching in Canada). It's a really effective piece - quite astringent - 'heard it at the end of a Radio 3 Choral Evensong from S. Africa some years ago - contacted the composer and he very kindly sent me a copy and a CD of his own performance from a Canadian Radio broadcast.

 

AJJ

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If you were going to learn one new piece for Easter, what would it be, and why?

 

J

 

How about Haec Dies from Paule Piédelièvre's 'Suite grégorienne' or Et Ressurexit by Kenneth Leighton.

 

Both pieces I've always meant to learn, but my tastes always were weird! B)

 

Jonathan

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  • 1 year later...
There's Jiri Ropek's "Victimae Paschali" variations....well worth getting to know.

 

I have just heard a recording of this piece and absolutely love it. Not sure if it's beyond my ability, though.

How difficult is it? What kinds of technique does it require?

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Guest Cynic
I have just heard a recording of this piece and absolutely love it. Not sure if it's beyond my ability, though.

How difficult is it? What kinds of technique does it require?

 

It would be a bit easier than the Dupre Variations on a Noel, so around Grade 8 Associated Board. I've just recorded it (at Liverpool Met) and although fiddly in places it's not a very great strain. I completely agree with earlier posts that say what an excellent piece it is. Technique? Allow sufficient time to learn it slowly and there'd be nothing insuperable - no giant leaps, no frantic semiquaver pedal runs, no little finger trills; a few rather unmemorable quick RH patterns, that would be the biggest challenge IMHO.

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2 easier pieces:

Guilmant's "Paraphrase on Judas Maccabeus" (Thine be the Glory") goes down very well with congregations, in my experience.

The Peeters prelude on "Christ ist Erstanden" in the "Lent and Easter" book of chorale preludes is effective.

 

Stephen Barber

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