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German Baroque Registration


Pierre Lauwers
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I just found a Thesis by Mr Wan Wyk, 2005, University of Pretoria,

which is an interesting reading:

 

http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd...ted/00front.pdf

 

Don't be afraid, only the introductions and conclusions are in afrikaans

(a quite understandable language, though! not very far from your neighbourg's

West-vlaams).

 

Use the links on the left to open the different Pdf-files.

 

Pierre

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Guest spottedmetal

Thanks so much for bringing this to attention! A brilliant piece of research. The new organ in Venice which I detailed on the Venice thread certainly complies with many of the priciples of registration set out in the thesis. The flat 21st is apparently unknown to German registration - is it more traditional to Italian instruments or is it a purely modern dimension introduced by Jackson and Harrison and Harrison?

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The flat Twenty first seems to have appeared in the Cavaillé-Coll organ

of Notre-Dame de Paris.

In England, it seems Thomas Casson followed, and that he was the inventor

of the "Harmonics" kind of Mixture.

In Germany, it seems the first was Karl Weigle, very end of the 19th century,

also integrated within Mixtures.

Eberhard Friedrich Walcker never used this rank, and of course the german baroque

builders never did as well, but the seventeenth was absolutely generalized, save

in the northern school, in which the Tierce is always in dedicate stops: Sesquialtera,

Terzian, Terzzymbel, which have solo as chorus uses as well.

Southern German organs often have the Tierce rank on Sesquialtera-like stops

(Hörnle, Hörnlei) on one manual, so that there is one Mixture without Tierce available,

but the characteristic southern chorus is marked by the tierce ranks, though.

 

The baroque (and indeed Renaissance, whose italian organ already was mature) italian

Ripieno has only octave and Quint ranks.

 

The Septième also is a main feature of the Post-romantic organ.

From this period evolved the idea of isolating such "strange" ranks on seperate stops,

gently voiced, in order to get "bottleneck effects". Think of Messiaen !

The next step was the "Reform".

 

Pierre

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The flat Twenty first seems to have appeared in the Cavaillé-Coll organ

of Notre-Dame de Paris.

In England, it seems Thomas Casson followed, and that he was the inventor

of the "Harmonics" kind of Mixture.

In Germany, it seems the first was Karl Weigle, very end of the 19th century,

also integrated within Mixtures.

Eberhard Friedrich Walcker never used this rank ...

When did Wilhelm Sauer specify his first "Großzymbel", which was 3 1/5' + 2 2/7' + 2' throughout? Maybe about the same time as Weigle did, but it might have been even a bit earlier.

 

Best,

Friedrich

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..............of course the german baroque

builders never did ......... the seventeenth was absolutely generalized, save

in the northern school, in which the Tierce is always in dedicate stops: Sesquialtera,

Terzian, Terzzymbel, which have solo as chorus uses as well.

 

====================

 

 

Not always. There are examples of Tierce mixtures which were never inended as solo voices, and therefore had a purely chorus function.

 

MM

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When did Wilhelm Sauer specify his first "Großzymbel", which was 3 1/5' + 2 2/7' + 2' throughout? Maybe about the same time as Weigle did, but it might have been even a bit earlier.

 

Best,

Friedrich

 

That was in Berlin, Dom:

 

http://www.gewalcker.de/gewalcker.de/PDF_p...BerlinerDom.pdf

 

1905 also.

 

Pierre

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