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A Strange Mixture Design


Pierre Lauwers
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I have encountered quite a lot of peculiar mixture designs while studying late-romantic organs, but this one may be one of the most interestings.

 

It is a "Cornett" to be found on the second manual (expressive) of a 1914 german organ.

(I apologize for the german notation)

 

C 4' 2 2/3' 2'

c 4' 2 2/3' 2' 1 3/5'

c1 4' 2 2/3' 2' 1 3/5' 1 1/3'

g2 4' 2 2/3' 2 2/3' 2' 1 3/5'

c3 4' 3 1/5' 2 2/3' 2 2/3' 2'

g3 5 1/3' 4' 4' 3 1/5' 2 2/3'

c4 6 2/5' 5 1/3' 5 1/3' 4' 4'

 

One could think it could be a design intended to work with reeds, but the only reed on this division is an Oboe 8'. there are five 8' flues, one 16', two 4' and one 2'. Any idea about the possibles purposes of such a design (a "contra-progression" followed by deep breaks up to 32') would be welcome. The author who presents it states this stop "to have solistic qualities". This I doubt slightly. What do you think?

Best wishes,

Pierre Lauwers.

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Guest Geoff McMahon

It is certainly interesting as a concept and I could believe it would have solo possibilities, but not much else I fear. Specifically, I would not expect a mixture like this to be much use with other stops on the organ, but so much would depend on how it was voiced of course. Has anybody actually heard it?

 

John Pike Mander

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Could you tell us where it is and who built it?

 

Recently I had to inspect an 1895 instrument after restoration and found a mixture of the "progressiv" variety in which the last few notes before the breaks had been made harmonic - quite a difference from the Sauer style in which the breaks tended to be made as inaudible as possible.

 

Barry Jordan

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This organ was built by Gebrudern Link (Giengen) at Andernach (Mayen-Koblenz) in 1914.

 

A "Progressiv harmonica" ("Progression harmonique", F; "Harmonic progression"; E) should have no breaks at all, only additions of ranks.

 

Best wishes,

Pete.

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  • 2 weeks later...
This organ was built by Gebrudern Link (Giengen) at Andernach (Mayen-Koblenz) in 1914.

 

A "Progressiv harmonica" ("Progression harmonique", F; "Harmonic progression"; E) should  have no breaks at all, only additions of ranks.

 

Best wishes,

Pete.

Here the term is used (sometimes) for a mixture in which one rank proceeds throughout without a break.

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