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Serious Organ Stuff On Youtube


Nick Bennett
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Among other things, there is quite a bit of footage taken in the organ loft at St Sulpice (apparently during services!) with both Daniel Roth and Sophie-Veronique Chauchefer-Choplin, as well as video of a recording session with Vincent Dubois.

 

What do you think of this stuff?

 

Are you inspired to contribute more?

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These video recordings are very good, and also help to raise the profile of the classical pipe organ to a wider audience. Feedback is always positive, with some commenting that they had no idea the classical organ could sound so good :D

 

If you visit the St Sulpice website there are many video streams on offer, including an interesting two part explanation by Daniel Roth of the organ. The first part is particularly good.

 

This 'unstuffy' approach by Roth and others who have posted on YouTube is a great plus, and is in stark contrast to the claustrophobic approach of the typical English scene. I doubt whether any eminent British organist would find time or the inclination to bring the classical organ at their command to a wider audience in this way. The majority are self-absorbed with their egos in the organ loft.

 

Of course, many will disagree with this view on this forum, there are exceptions I am sure, but generally the facts I believe speak for themselves :rolleyes:

 

 

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Well, if you dig around a bit, you will find some of the BBC Bach series with John Scott-Whiteley.

 

John isn't stuffy at all.

 

MM

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Guest Lee Blick
These video recordings are very good, and also help to raise the profile of the classical pipe organ to a wider audience. Feedback is always positive, with some commenting that they had no idea the classical organ could sound so good :D

 

If you visit the St Sulpice website there are many video streams on offer, including an interesting two part explanation by Daniel Roth of the organ. The first part is particularly good.

 

This 'unstuffy' approach by Roth and others who have posted on YouTube is a great plus, and is in stark contrast to the claustrophobic approach of the typical English scene. I doubt whether any eminent British organist would find time or the inclination to bring the classical organ at their command to a wider audience in this way. The majority are self-absorbed with their egos in the organ loft.

 

Of course, many will disagree with this view on this forum, there are exceptions I am sure, but generally the facts I believe speak for themselves :rolleyes:

 

Totally agree with you. Roth is amazing, I love watching him play and plenty of others who play with passion and a sense of energy. :D

 

I love watching organ videos online especially the continental organs. I just love the sound and the temperament, Bach and Buxtehude have 'bite' in them on these instruments. British organs cant really compare in that respect, in my opinion.

 

I quite like watching the amateurs play too you get the sense that the organ can be shared by everyone, not just the preserve of the elite.

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Yes Lee, certainly with the case of Daniel Roth you feel he is genuinely interested in explaining such a superb instrument. It is this human approach which is so enjoyable, and no wonder he enjoys such a fine reputation throughout the world :D  I really do highly recommend these video streams on the St Sulpice website :rolleyes:

 

Go and visit too if you can - I did the other week and he was very hospitable.

 

AJJ

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Guest Lee Blick

About ten years ago I went to visit Liverpool Anglican Cathedral and a big service was taking place that afternoon. Before the service I was walking around and a friendly steward introduced herself and we got chatting and I mentioned that I was an organist. The lady said she could introduce me to the assistant organist after the service, which sounded great. But when she introduced me to him at the nave console (which looked spanking brand new) he showed no interest whatsoever. I mentioned that I heard the voluntary (Pierne, I think) on a recent new recording on that organ, and he said "Oh, that was the boss", locked up the organ console and walked away. I was a little bit upset at the rather standoffish attitude which was unlike my experience of the city itself, the people were very friendly and hospitable.

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Guest Barry Oakley
About ten years ago I went to visit Liverpool Anglican Cathedral and a big service was taking place that afternoon.  Before the service I was walking around and a friendly steward introduced herself and we got chatting and I mentioned that I was an organist.  The lady said she could introduce me to the assistant organist after the service, which sounded great.  But when she introduced me to him at the nave console (which looked spanking brand new) he showed no interest whatsoever.  I mentioned that I heard the voluntary (Pierne, I think) on a recent new recording on that organ, and he said "Oh, that was the boss", locked up the organ console and walked away.  I was a little bit upset at the rather standoffish attitude which was unlike my experience of the city itself, the people were very friendly and hospitable.

 

I'm afraid a lot of them have this predisposition to regard even genuinely interested people as a nuisance. I can't remember who the sub organist was 10 years ago, but if you have never met "the boss" (Ian Tracey) I can tell you that he is a very pleasant, friendly man always willing to listen and chat. When giving recitals his inter-music talks are often very amusing and informative. I'm positive he would not have given you that sort of treatment.

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I'm afraid a lot of them have this predisposition to regard even genuinely interested people as a nuisance. I can't remember who the sub organist was 10 years ago, but if you have never met "the boss" (Ian Tracey) I can tell you that he is a very pleasant, friendly man always willing to listen and chat. When giving recitals his inter-music talks are often very amusing and informative. I'm positive he would not have given you that sort of treatment.

 

It's surprising that I still play the organ, piano, harpsichord and celeste given the number of times I was dismissively shoo'd away from those instruments as a child, my interest rebuffed by both amateur and professional. Perhaps if I'd been given a warmer welcome my interest would have waned. :mellow:

 

Michael

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It's surprising that I still play the organ, piano, harpsichord and celeste given the number of times I was dismissively shoo'd away from those instruments as a child, my interest rebuffed by both amateur and professional. Perhaps if I'd been given a warmer welcome my interest would have waned. :mellow:

 

Michael

 

 

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I can't say that I'm surprised, because the average recital-punter is just as bad.

 

I recall playing a recital at St.Bride's, Fleet Street which fell on the day of a General Election, and the programme consisted of just two works; the 18 "Nun Komm der heiden heiland" Bach, and the Sonata on the 94th Psalm, Reubke.

 

Before the recital, I said to the assembled company, "I think the choice of music has turned out to be highly appropriate, even though I didn't know it was going to be general election day when I chose the pieces. I suppose each of us will, on the one hand, (and in whatever way), be hoping for spiritual intervention from above, and on the other hand, that the proud will be rewarded after their deserving."

 

Not a flicker of a smile!

 

I'd even brought along a bit of visual comedy in the form of a young 17-year-old page-turner from Luton, who was really into classical music.

 

He had hair which flopped all the way down one side of his head, in what I thought was just a "new age" fashion statement.

 

It was when he asked, "Shall I put my hair up, or keep it down?"

 

I then realised my mistake.

 

"Oh! Definitely up!" I replied enthusiastically.

 

So the audience were treated to the sight of a rather dapper organist in a pin-stripe, playing the organ, with a "new age" punk, sporting a multi-coloured mohican turning the pages!

 

:mellow:

 

MM

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Guest Lee Blick

Well I can understand your frustration, MM. But I am talking about organists who cannot be bothered to acknowledge or engage with other organists. There is something wrong with our art if people can't even do that.

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