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#41 Deinonychus

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 09:49 AM

St Peter's, Eaton Sq, London:
 
Viola Felix
 
I have a lurking memory that this is something to do with somone's cat, though I did play this instrument shortly after its inauguration and it didn't sound particularly feline as I recall.  Maybe it had been doctored.
 
St Anne's, Moseley, Birmingham:
 
Flauto Magico
 
CEP

There are two cats in the St Peter's organ, according to the second post on this page; the Viola Felix and the Tibia Sylvestris: http://mander-organs...d-organs/page-3

#42 John Robinson

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 09:09 PM

St Peter's, Eaton Sq, London:

 

Viola Felix

 

I have a lurking memory that this is something to do with somone's cat, though I did play this instrument shortly after its inauguration and it didn't sound particularly feline as I recall.  Maybe it had been doctored.

 

St Anne's, Moseley, Birmingham:

 

Flauto Magico

 

CEP

Not too uncommon.  The almost defunct organ in my childhood's church has one:

http://www.npor.org.....html?RI=N02680



#43 Vox Humana

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 10:00 PM

St Anne's, Moseley, Birmingham:

 

Flauto Magico

 

Not too uncommon.  The almost defunct organ in my childhood's church has one:

http://www.npor.org.....html?RI=N02680

 

Just another name for Zauberflöte perhaps?



#44 sprondel

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Posted 04 September 2016 - 08:44 AM

Just another name for Zauberflöte perhaps?

 

I believe it was HW IIIrd’s hardly concealed adaptation of Skinner’s stop. Just like his Sylvestrina, which as far as I know is not much different from an Erzähler.

 

Best wishes

Friedrich



#45 philipmgwright

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Posted 04 September 2016 - 09:14 AM

Hautbois d'Amour

Paisley Abbey Swell HN&B 1928 from original CC but under different name
Renamed by JWW in Ralph Downes 1968

philipmgwright

#46 Gwas Bach

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Posted 04 September 2016 - 02:41 PM

I came across this organ recently - it strikes me as an eccentric specification.



#47 David Drinkell

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Posted 04 September 2016 - 08:35 PM

Wimbotsham in Norfolk had something similar, dating from 1906: 

 

Manual: Lieblich Bourdon tc 16, Open Diapason Treble 8, Open Diapason Bass, Gamba 8, Salicional 8, Flauto Traverso 4

Octave coupler

 

Pedal: Bourdon 16

Manual to Pedal

 

As far as is known, this was the only organ built by William Bertram Cowing of Barnet when working on his own, although he was at one time in partnership with Robert Spurden Rutt.  

 

In 1988, Holmes and Swift replaced the Gamba with a Principal, which made sense. Before that, with the octave coupler, one could at least get a semblance of a chorus, but otherwise it was much the same as the organ quoted by Gwas Bach, with a 4' flute as the only upperwork and no 8' flute to go with it. 

 

I remember a chance remark by the late, great Richard Galloway of Holy Rude, Stirling, one well-lubricated evening at the Scottish Organists' Summer School: "My dad was fond of 16' tone on the manuals". People were in those days, to a much greater extent than we have been in the last 40 years or so.  Marmaduke Conway, in "Playing the Church Organ" advocated a manual 16' before a Fifteenth, and Gordon Slater liked 16' Dulcianas, to the extent of specifying one as a second Great double in a not-so-big two-manual organ.  Dick's remark made me think - in the way that passing comments often do - and since then I have made a lot more use of doubles than I did before, when it seemed appropriate.  I find open doubles, like Contra Geigen, Double Dulciana, Double Open, to be the best, even with a stopped bass.  I've never got to liking most manual Bourdons or Quintatons.

 

It does seem strange that builders would specify a 4' flute with no 8'.  There are some (mostly enclosed) opens that carry the 4' flute nicely, but it's not "normal" registration, and neither is drawing a 4' flute over a gamba or salicional, although it might sound nice as an occasional effect.  But it was quite common, especially among builders in the North of England to provide Open, Gamba and perhaps even Celeste at 8' but only a Flute at 4', even when there was a Mixture and maybe a Piccolo as well.

 

Flauto Magico was fairly commonly used by Brindley and Foster - in fact, the presence of one is virtually a giveaway as to the builder.  I don't know if they were zauberflotes.  I don't recall Henry Willis III using the name unless he was rebuilding a Brindley.



#48 AJJ

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Posted 04 September 2016 - 09:07 PM

Wimbotsham in Norfolk had something similar, dating from 1906: 
 
Manual: Lieblich Bourdon tc 16, Open Diapason Treble 8, Open Diapason Bass, Gamba 8, Salicional 8, Flauto Traverso 4
Octave coupler
 
Pedal: Bourdon 16
Manual to Pedal
 
As far as is known, this was the only organ built by William Bertram Cowing of Barnet when working on his own......

There is/was a Cowing organ at Barnet Baptist Church....

http://www.npor.org.....html?RI=N14527

...and interestingly Spurden Rutt worked at both the Methodist and Congregational Churches there. Barnet is my home town but I do not know the up to date state of organs in these churches currently. The Methodist church was sold for redevelopment many years ago however.

A
"…We can’t criticize the organ for being boring. In such cases it is the organist that is boring. There is no such thing as a boring organ."

#49 Andrew Butler

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Posted 05 September 2016 - 07:14 AM

St Peter's, Eaton Sq, London:

 

Viola Felix

 

I have a lurking memory that this is something to do with somone's cat, though I did play this instrument shortly after its inauguration and it didn't sound particularly feline as I recall.  Maybe it had been doctored.

 

St Anne's, Moseley, Birmingham:

 

Flauto Magico

 

CEP

Stephen Ridgeley-Whitehouse's cat?



#50 Andrew Butler

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Posted 05 September 2016 - 07:19 AM

I believe some 18th c English organs had a "Cart 2' "  - an Anglicisation of "Quarte de Nazard"



#51 David Drinkell

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Posted 05 September 2016 - 04:14 PM

Thanks for the information regarding Cowing at Barnet Baptist.  I can't remember if it was Bernard Edmonds, Gordon Paget or Laurence Elvin who reckoned that Wimbotsham was his only solo job.  I will drop a note to NPOR accordingly.

 

Stephen Ridgely-Whitehouse's cats were indeed called Felix and Sylvester, both of whom are commemorated on stop-konbs at Eaton Square.

 

Renatus Harris specified "Cart" - as you say, an anglicisation of 'Quarte" - which would be appropriate in view of his French training.



#52 Andrew Butler

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 01:28 PM

Just remembered this http://www.npor.org.....html?RI=E01860



#53 Gwas Bach

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 03:11 PM

This is in a similar vein.



#54 David Drinkell

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 03:13 PM

The oddity in the organ Andrew mentions at Clifford, Yorkshire, arises, I think, from it having been a residence organ.  Originally, the secondary manual was designated "Solo" and had just one stop, called "Solo Open Diapason", which would have worked quite well in the style of registration then in use.  Today, with the added 8' flute, it would be very suitable for the responsorial type of Roman liturgy, provided that the cantor isn't a Mr. Caruso type who bellows into a mike and snuffs out any disposition the rest of the congregation might have had to join in.

 

Gwas Bach's example in Gloucestershire is not quite as unusual as might be thought.  The Revd. F.H. Sutton, a member of the ecclesiological Sutton family which included Sir John (of Jesus College) and Augustus (of West Tofts), was quite keen on the idea of a Choir Organ instead of a Great, relying on a big Swell for the major effects.  It makes sense if you've got a chancel choir to accompany. The Wordsworth & Maskell at Brant Broughton, Lincolnshire, where Suttons (including F.H.) were incumbents for many years is another example.  The Choir Organ was apparently preferred to a Great because F.H. liked plainsong.  W&M were popular with ecclesiologically-minded clergy (as was Miller of Cambridge) and the organ has a fine Bodley case.



#55 Andrew Butler

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 05:47 PM

The oddity in the organ Andrew mentions at Clifford, Yorkshire, arises, I think, from it having been a residence organ.  Originally, the secondary manual was designated "Solo" and had just one stop, called "Solo Open Diapason", which would have worked quite well in the style of registration then in use.  Today, with the added 8' flute, it would be very suitable for the responsorial type of Roman liturgy, provided that the cantor isn't a Mr. Caruso type who bellows into a mike and snuffs out any disposition the rest of the congregation might have had to join in.

 

Gwas Bach's example in Gloucestershire is not quite as unusual as might be thought.  The Revd. F.H. Sutton, a member of the ecclesiological Sutton family which included Sir John (of Jesus College) and Augustus (of West Tofts), was quite keen on the idea of a Choir Organ instead of a Great, relying on a big Swell for the major effects.  It makes sense if you've got a chancel choir to accompany. The Wordsworth & Maskell at Brant Broughton, Lincolnshire, where Suttons (including F.H.) were incumbents for many years is another example.  The Choir Organ was apparently preferred to a Great because F.H. liked plainsong.  W&M were popular with ecclesiologically-minded clergy (as was Miller of Cambridge) and the organ has a fine Bodley case.

 

Thanks David - I hadn't taken on board that it had been a residence organ.

 

Another with a Choir and no Great is http://www.npor.org.....html?RI=N08486



#56 David Drinkell

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 07:08 PM

When you look at them, a lot of organs from the turn of the last century have a lower manual which is basically a Choir Organ plus a big diapason "to lead the singing".  The registration would be additive, as on a French organ, with the Swell to Great on most of the time and the swell-box used to cover up the addition of stops.  In other words, the spec would be the stops the local cathedral organist used most often on his four-manual Willis/Hill/Walker/Harrison to accompany his choir, plus the diapason to keep the hymns going.



#57 AJJ

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 07:29 PM

When you look at them, a lot of organs from the turn of the last century have a lower manual which is basically a Choir Organ plus a big diapason "to lead the singing".  The registration would be additive, as on a French organ, with the Swell to Great on most of the time and the swell-box used to cover up the addition of stops.  In other words, the spec would be the stops the local cathedral organist used most often on his four-manual Willis/Hill/Walker/Harrison to accompany his choir, plus the diapason to keep the hymns going.

Yes, and if you take it even further you get the sort of one manual job than can be found in many villages down this way. In chancel with choir if there is one - 8' OD and possibly 4' unenclosed with 8' and 4' flutes, 8' string or Dulciana with possible Celeste, 2', maybe Mixture and an Oboe all enclosed. Solitary 16' on the Pedal with coupler. Even the sometimes lowest octave missing from the 8's is not always a problem as the separate drawing stopped 8' bass can be creatively used with the pedal coupler. It always amazes me what these little gems can actually do - great for the more 'village' end of the choir repertoire and able to cope with a surprising ammount of 'proper' organ repertoire. They can also keep a moderate sized congregation in time.

A
"…We can’t criticize the organ for being boring. In such cases it is the organist that is boring. There is no such thing as a boring organ."

#58 Damian Beasley-Suffolk

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 08:25 PM

I have played (briefly) and listened to (with much more pleasure when someone else was playing) the Gray and Davison at Huntley that Gwas Bach mentions. The "Choir" seems almost to be incorrectly labelled. I recall it being a nice, fairly strong "rosbif" division which suits the not large but rather lovely church nicely - perhaps the addition of a Fifteenth might be too much. I don't recall there being any indication that a Great was prepared for or even considered. But the whole instrument sounded just right. And it did indeed acquit itself with the required raucousness with Lefébure-Wély at my cousin's wedding there a good few years ago :-)

 

As for other oddities, the organ which my wife first played at as a 12-year old at Witton Park in County Durham, http://www.npor.org.....html?RI=N15085, has a Swell of 8,8,2,8 to go with an 8,8,8,4 Great. The 2' is just about noticeable above the Great 8+4, but seems to work nicely along with the other Swell stops in the building. Looks odd, sounds nice. Trust your ears, they always say. More about that instrument when I get around to addressing the drought of letters in Organists' Review.

 

In a good number of small instruments seen here in the Netherlands and in Germany, one often sees really odd specs such as 4,2 (1 1/3, or 1/2), 8 (regal), and mostly on neo-baroque instruments. Sometimes this is found on the "second" manual of smaller instruments. Bourgarel made a few, such as this http://www.france-or...doc.fch&ido=792, and there are some Iberian examples such as this http://www.france-orgue.fr/orgue/index.php?zpg=org.doc.fch&ido=792. Odd to my eyes, but common enough to appreciate that there is a repertoire for these instruments of which I'm wholly ignorant, apart from having fun playing Batallas badly, beyond just making a compact study organ.



#59 bam

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 09:09 AM

When you look at them, a lot of organs from the turn of the last century have a lower manual which is basically a Choir Organ plus a big diapason "to lead the singing".  The registration would be additive, as on a French organ, with the Swell to Great on most of the time and the swell-box used to cover up the addition of stops.  In other words, the spec would be the stops the local cathedral organist used most often on his four-manual Willis/Hill/Walker/Harrison to accompany his choir, plus the diapason to keep the hymns going.

 

This is an interesting example, which sounds a lot better in the church than at the console:

 

http://www.npor.org.....html?RI=N09233



#60 David Drinkell

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 03:15 PM

 

This is an interesting example, which sounds a lot better in the church than at the console:

 

http://www.npor.org.....html?RI=N09233

Yes, that looks very promising.  As usual, it relies on the Swell to Great coupler for flexibility.  There's nothing inherently wrong with this, after all it's a feature of Cavaille-Coll organs and Sam Clutton used to wax eloquent about a small 18th century organ which had a similar spread, giving a one manual organ spread over two keyboards.

 

Going off on a slight tangent - the Dulciana borrows its bass from the gedact, which gives a very noticeable change of tone in the bottom octave.  This is so very common, particularly with Swell basses, but Bernard Edmonds pointed out a clever solution used by that much under-rated firm, Taylor of Leicester.  Instead of running the string into the gedact, they stopped the Open Diapason at tenor C and borrowed the bass from the gedact and the string together.  Bernard said that if he hadn't known, he would never have noticed.  HN&B did something similar (in what Henry Willis 4 is said to have referred to jokingly as "John Norman's bassless organs") to save space and cost.






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