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Guest Roffensis

I have recently had the pleasure of playing the Organ at Giggleswick School Chapel, recently fully rebuilt by Gary Owens (GO organs)

The original organ was a 1901 Willis, but had subsequently been altered by two builders, with the original tonal concept somewhat clouded. The recent rebuild is now complete, and there has been a return to the original style, which has however been enhanced most sensitively. The old organ as built had something of an old world charm about it, with no upperwork, and a rather restrained quality which made it ideal for choral work, but quite dull for anything else. Later additions of mixtures sought to address this, but the organ really did not know quite what it was, with a typical choir division along classical lines, and a very bright mixture on the great that did not blend with anything. The recent work has seen the mixture toned down to balance, and, to increase power, there is a new 8 foot trumpet on the great, matched by a 16 foot pedal reed. The excellent swell Cornopean is as it was, the 8 foot Oboe likewise, in fact all the original Willis work has all been retained and respected, complemented by contemporary 1901 pipework to match. The flutes are all full of character, with each different, and hence many different combinations are available. The choruses are unified, and the organ possesses a sweetness that will never tire.

 

If the organ had a unforced quality about it when built, that it still has, but it has evolved into a very fine instrument finally worthy of the beautiful chapel in which it lives. Although it's role in choral work has been enhanced with the replacement of many essential quieter voices, the organ is now also excellent as a true recital instrument, and has, when required, incredible power.

 

I honestly believe Mr Owens is to be congratulated, not only for the attention to detail in both action and console (complete with original Willis keys and toggle touch) , but also in restoring the original tonal concept and choosing to build upon that. This is an organ well worth hearing, and I gather already some very eminent organists have been most impressed with it.

 

Richard

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I have recently had the pleasure of playing the Organ at Giggleswick School Chapel, recently fully rebuilt by Gary Owens (GO organs)

The original organ was a 1901 Willis, but had subsequently been altered by two builders, with the original tonal concept somewhat clouded. The recent rebuild is now complete, and there has been a return to the original style, which has however been enhanced most sensitively. The old organ as built had something of an old world charm about it, with no upperwork, and a rather restrained quality which made it ideal for choral work, but quite dull for anything else. Later additions of mixtures sought to address this, but the organ really did not know quite what it was, with a typical choir division along classical lines, and a very bright mixture on the great that did not blend with anything. The recent work has seen the mixture toned down to balance, and, to increase power, there is a new 8 foot trumpet on the great, matched by a 16 foot pedal reed. The excellent swell Cornopean is as it was, the 8 foot Oboe likewise, in fact all the original Willis work has all been retained and respected, complemented by contemporary 1901 pipework to match. The flutes are all full of character, with each different, and hence many different combinations are available. The choruses are unified, and the organ possesses a sweetness that will never tire.

 

If the organ had a unforced quality about it when built, that it still has, but it has evolved into a very fine instrument finally worthy of the beautiful chapel in which it lives. Although it's role in choral work has been enhanced with the replacement of many essential quieter voices, the organ is now also excellent as a true recital instrument, and has, when required, incredible power.

 

I honestly believe Mr Owens is to be congratulated, not only for the attention to detail in both action and console (complete with original Willis keys and toggle touch) , but also in restoring  the original tonal concept and choosing to build upon that. This is an organ well worth hearing, and I gather already some very eminent organists have been most impressed with it.

 

Richard

 

 

======================

 

 

There was me, in another post, suggesting that the Yorkshire Dales were a cultural desert!!

 

I'd forgotten about Giggleswick, where some of the Willis family were educated....hence the gift of the original Willis organ.

 

Someone should do a survey of "school organs" in the UK, which would yield quite a list of fine instruments.

 

I know of a William Hill organ in a school, which was never finished, but which sits there awaiting completion. I don't think anyone much knows about it!

 

MM

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I have recently had the pleasure of playing the Organ at Giggleswick School Chapel, recently fully rebuilt by Gary Owens (GO organs)

The original organ was a 1901 Willis, but had subsequently been altered by two builders, with the original tonal concept somewhat clouded. The recent rebuild is now complete, and there has been a return to the original style, which has however been enhanced most sensitively. The old organ as built had something of an old world charm about it, with no upperwork, and a rather restrained quality which made it ideal for choral work, but quite dull for anything else. Later additions of mixtures sought to address this, but the organ really did not know quite what it was, with a typical choir division along classical lines, and a very bright mixture on the great that did not blend with anything. The recent work has seen the mixture toned down to balance, and, to increase power, there is a new 8 foot trumpet on the great, matched by a 16 foot pedal reed. The excellent swell Cornopean is as it was, the 8 foot Oboe likewise, in fact all the original Willis work has all been retained and respected, complemented by contemporary 1901 pipework to match. The flutes are all full of character, with each different, and hence many different combinations are available. The choruses are unified, and the organ possesses a sweetness that will never tire.

 

If the organ had a unforced quality about it when built, that it still has, but it has evolved into a very fine instrument finally worthy of the beautiful chapel in which it lives. Although it's role in choral work has been enhanced with the replacement of many essential quieter voices, the organ is now also excellent as a true recital instrument, and has, when required, incredible power.

 

I honestly believe Mr Owens is to be congratulated, not only for the attention to detail in both action and console (complete with original Willis keys and toggle touch) , but also in restoring  the original tonal concept and choosing to build upon that. This is an organ well worth hearing, and I gather already some very eminent organists have been most impressed with it.

 

Richard

I have similarly heard favourable reports from a distinguished recitalist who played there last year. Do you know where it might be possible to get hold of the stoplist and other technical details of this project? The GO Organs website appears to have been discontinued. Hope the big ivory "mushroom" drawstops have survived!

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I have similarly heard favourable reports from a distinguished recitalist who played there last year. Do you know where it might be possible to get hold of the stoplist and other technical details of this project? The GO Organs website appears to have been discontinued. Hope the big ivory "mushroom" drawstops have survived!

 

Try this...

 

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N01502

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This could be pre recent work as the reeds mentioned earlier do not seem to have arrived in the spec. yet.

 

AJJ

 

Hi

 

You're correct in assuming this - if you look at the survey "state" it says "not up to date" - and that's because we were only told that work had been done by GO Organs with no further detail. If you can give us an up to date stop list, please send it to the NPOR office.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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